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My first hone

The issue of the heel being lifted should be resolved with the help in this thread. Before getting any more razors, I want to get a decent edge on the one I have, even if it takes months.
I typically use a diamond plate to relieve excessive width in the affected areas while others use a Dremel.
 

Slash McCoy

I freehand dog rockets
I'm reading about honing quite a lot while looking for some marble or glass. I want to lap the stones with sandpaper but I can't find some flat surface. Diamond lapping plates are expensive and quite hard to get around here.
It would be helpful if you included your location in your profile. What I use is cast acrylic sheet, usually 3/4" for lapping stones. My source is www.tapplastics.com . Costs more than tile, but it is flatter, lighter, thicker, and unbreakable for all practical purposes.

Not all glass is flat. Float glass is not. Plate glass may be, and usually is, flat enough. Polished tile varies, ceramic tile is never flat enough. The sink cutout from a granite countertop is usually nice and flat, and can sometimes be had for free.

If you shop around online, you might find a granite machinist's surface plate, complete with calibration report, for under $50. A used one is good, too. You will find many uses for a surface plate. Or maybe not.
 
It would be helpful if you included your location in your profile. What I use is cast acrylic sheet, usually 3/4" for lapping stones. My source is www.tapplastics.com . Costs more than tile, but it is flatter, lighter, thicker, and unbreakable for all practical purposes.

Not all glass is flat. Float glass is not. Plate glass may be, and usually is, flat enough. Polished tile varies, ceramic tile is never flat enough. The sink cutout from a granite countertop is usually nice and flat, and can sometimes be had for free.

If you shop around online, you might find a granite machinist's surface plate, complete with calibration report, for under $50. A used one is good, too. You will find many uses for a surface plate. Or maybe not.
Location updated - Slovakia, Nice idea.

I've Been browsing the internet to find some of these mentioned items second hand. I'd like to find a bargain. Later on, I will purchase a Diamond lapping plate for convinience. But firstly I'd like to try it with minimal investment.
 
I'm reading about honing quite a lot while looking for some marble or glass. I want to lap the stones with sandpaper but I can't find some flat surface. Diamond lapping plates are expensive and quite hard to get around here.
My girlfriend had a glass chopping board when I started honing. It was flat and I’d imagine easy to find online or in a kitchen store. Might be an option for you.
 
You can buy a 3.5X12 inch glass tile from any big box hardware store for about $5 and spray glue a piece of 220 wet and dry to it, then use just like a diamond plate.

Glass tile may not be “dead flat,” but you can easily lap glass flat on a piece of 220 paper. Glass cuts easily and quickly.

But a good 300/1000 grit diamond plate can be purchased for $20-30 online or Chef Knives to Go. If you do not abuse it. It will last a lifetime of synthetic stone lapping.

Even abused, I have plates that have lost some Diamonds and are still cutting fine and used daily. I have plates from all the big guns and eBay cheapo’s, they all work.

You will need to lap a stone initially, bevel and round the edges, then lap to clean and refresh a stone face before each use and often during use, especially before the final finish laps.
 
I proclaim the 1k Stone to be flat! With chamfered edges.

I used a Mirror finish "marble" tile with 320 sandpaper. I worked it until the pencil Grid dissapeared evenly under 5 seconds. I used the 120 grit flattening stones for the edges and I gave the stones about 2mm x 45° chamfer - of course this was eyeballed and done under 15 seconds on each side.

The stones sticked to the sandpaper like crazy.

And now, to get the bevel... I will keep you posted throughout the weekend.
 
Today I attempted to raise a burr, successfuly on both sides. It was subtle, but definitely there. After I raised the burr on both sides I removed it using alternating strokes. After about 30 light laps, the razor started sticking to the stone and I was starting to be excited. I tried shaving Arm hair. Some hair got picked up but it was by no means shaving easily. I inspected the edge and noticed something that gave me a little heart attack. See for yourself below. I never dreamed of finding a crack in the edge like that one.
 

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rbscebu

Girls call me Makaluod
That crack is not just in the bevel, it is going up into the blade. I have never experienced a crack like that in all (over a dozen) the Titan ACRM-2 T.H.60 SRs that I have honed.

For the time being, just ignore the crack and continue learning to hone the edge to shave-ready. A couple of cracks like that should not noticeably affect the shave quality.
 
Just my .02 cents. I don't know the magnification of the loupe through which you've taken those great photos, but I have an Aust with what appears to the naked eye to be a crack. Under a 10X loupe it looks even more like a crack. It's not until I use the 30X / 60X loupe that @Doc226 linked, that I see it's not a crack at all, but a "spot" (more like a run) of oxidation that looks like a very fine splatter of solder (of course it's not) I don't know how else to describe it. After a year or more I will have honed past it, I imagine. My imperfection doesn't go a thickness of a bevel past the bevel, so it's not as long as yours.

Any chance it's not a crack, but just oxidation?
 
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