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Move over metrosexual's, The rise of the Lumbersexuals are upon us

...but I'd bet dollars to donuts that he now spends a great deal of money to dress very carefully for a specific image to present to the world to keep up the Zac Brown Small Town Country Boy Brand.
Which to me, ain't that much different from the hipster.
I think the two are radically different. The Zac Brown Small Town Country Boy Brand is a commercial product with explicit customer expectations, but it grew from a real circumstance.

The hipster image that's so carefully crafted is to provide self reinforcement of a specific counterculture movement that relies on mom & dad's money to survive.
 
I think the two are radically different. The Zac Brown Small Town Country Boy Brand is a commercial product with explicit customer expectations, but it grew from a real circumstance.

The hipster image that's so carefully crafted is to provide self reinforcement of a specific counterculture movement that relies on mom & dad's money to survive.
You think the two are "radically different", but you don't actually know a thing about either one of them. Thats an awfully bold assumption, don't you think?

It is possible that Zac Brown was coached by a manager to dress and present himself in a specific way to support his music. Marketing is marketing, regardless of the market you are targeting. It doesn't really matter if he actually grew up beneath the shade of a Georgia Pine, or in a high-rise apartment complex in the middle of Atlanta proper. His music and fashion choices very precisely depict the image he has chosen to present.

And to assume that anyone sporting "hipster fashion" is doing so at their parent's expense and as some way to reinforce some "movement" is equally ludicrous. Take, for example, Eric Bandholz, who is one of the pioneers of "hipster fashion". He is young, in his late 20s, wears skinny jeans, rolled cuffs and work boots, has a HUGE beard, and exemplifies the "urban lumbersexual" fashion. He is also a very successful businessman with his own brand, his own labels, and his own fortune, which he built from the ground up.

Fashion is fashion, people. These kids out here running around in their F-250 diesel trucks, wearing their Carhart jackets, camo ball caps, and cowboy boots are projecting a fashion choice equally as ridiculous and funded by mommy and daddy as the urban hipster is.

Lending credence and value to one while condescending the other speaks volumes of character...not the fashionistas character...your own...
 
Fashion is fashion, people. These kids out here running around in their F-250 diesel trucks, wearing their Carhart jackets, camo ball caps, and cowboy boots are projecting a fashion choice equally as ridiculous and funded by mommy and daddy as the urban hipster ...
You are off a bit here. Where I live, more of the roads are gravel than paved. Lots of kids live on farms or very rural properties. The pickup truck isn't always a statement, but a way of life. Most of these pickups, if they don't have a bale of straw in the back, are carrying tools or deer stands or fishing gear. These kids bow hunt, spear and ice fish, ride ATVs and dirt bikes, and do all their own mod work on those F-250 pickups.

My son did most of his school shopping at our Fleet Farm, which meant Carhart, Levis, flannel shirts and a pair of Georgia lace ups. He wasn't sporting a look, he was just buying some clothes. It's called rural, and frankly, when rural people do it, it isn't ridiculous, it is life.

I could care less what you (meaning anyone) wear. Just understand that country/blue collar people see a certain irony in that after they have been smirked at and looked down on as rednecks or white trash forever, that NOW that look is cool? To me, it's kind of a laugh riot.

Lumbersexuals may be going for a look, but the majority of the ones I see aren't pulling it off. A similar comparison would be that I own a pretty nice suit, but am aware that when I wear it I look as out of place as a nun at a rock concert. I don't pull it off.
 

Raven Koenes

Contributor
You are off a bit here. Where I live, more of the roads are gravel than paved. Lots of kids live on farms or very rural properties. The pickup truck isn't always a statement, but a way of life. Most of these pickups, if they don't have a bale of straw in the back, are carrying tools or deer stands or fishing gear. These kids bow hunt, spear and ice fish, ride ATVs and dirt bikes, and do all their own mod work on those F-250 pickups.

My son did most of his school shopping at our Fleet Farm, which meant Carhart, Levis, flannel shirts and a pair of Georgia lace ups. He wasn't sporting a look, he was just buying some clothes. It's called rural, and frankly, when rural people do it, it isn't ridiculous, it is life.

I could care less what you (meaning anyone) wear. Just understand that country/blue collar people see a certain irony in that after they have been smirked at and looked down on as rednecks or white trash forever, that NOW that look is cool? To me, it's kind of a laugh riot.

Lumbersexuals may be going for a look, but the majority of the ones I see aren't pulling it off. A similar comparison would be that I own a pretty nice suit, but am aware that when I wear it I look as out of place as a nun at a rock concert. I don't pull it off.
My wife has said she didn't get the whole pick-up truck thing and saw it as fashion statement until she moved to Texas and found it to be an actual necessity.
 
You are off a bit here. Where I live, more of the roads are gravel than paved. Lots of kids live on farms or very rural properties. The pickup truck isn't always a statement, but a way of life. Most of these pickups, if they don't have a bale of straw in the back, are carrying tools or deer stands or fishing gear. These kids bow hunt, spear and ice fish, ride ATVs and dirt bikes, and do all their own mod work on those F-250 pickups.

My son did most of his school shopping at our Fleet Farm, which meant Carhart, Levis, flannel shirts and a pair of Georgia lace ups. He wasn't sporting a look, he was just buying some clothes. It's called rural, and frankly, when rural people do it, it isn't ridiculous, it is life.

I could care less what you (meaning anyone) wear. Just understand that country/blue collar people see a certain irony in that after they have been smirked at and looked down on as rednecks or white trash forever, that NOW that look is cool? To me, it's kind of a laugh riot.

Lumbersexuals may be going for a look, but the majority of the ones I see aren't pulling it off. A similar comparison would be that I own a pretty nice suit, but am aware that when I wear it I look as out of place as a nun at a rock concert. I don't pull it off.
Actually, where I live is also very rural...There are more ranches than houses. I actually live in the "Mule Capital of the World", and we have an annual parade that is widely known as the longest and largest non-motorized parade in the country. Mule packers still exist, ranch hands still ride horses through town, and and on any given day there are more real, working cowboys than suit-wearing businessmen.

Which proves my point...people make clothing choices. Assuming anything about an individual based on your closed-minded, personal perception of what you THINK they might be trying to say is ridiculous, and unnecessary.

Not all kids wearing Carharts and driving F-250s are hard-working ranch hands. Not all "hipsters" wearing skinny jeans and jack boots are mooching off their parents.

The problem isn't the clothing. The problem is presuming to know something about someone based on a personal and pre-conceived idea of what you THINK you know about that person.

Bering judgemental of someone because you don't like how they look is what is ridiculous...not the look...
 

luvmysuper

Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
Renowned Anthropologist Margaret Mead was said to have observed:

"Always remember that you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else."
 
Actually, where I live is also very rural...There are more ranches than houses. I actually live in the "Mule Capital of the World", and we have an annual parade that is widely known as the longest and largest non-motorized parade in the country. Mule packers still exist, ranch hands still ride horses through town, and and on any given day there are more real, working cowboys than suit-wearing businessmen.

Which proves my point...people make clothing choices. Assuming anything about an individual based on your closed-minded, personal perception of what you THINK they might be trying to say is ridiculous, and unnecessary.

Not all kids wearing Carharts and driving F-250s are hard-working ranch hands. Not all "hipsters" wearing skinny jeans and jack boots are mooching off their parents.

The problem isn't the clothing. The problem is presuming to know something about someone based on a personal and pre-conceived idea of what you THINK you know about that person.

Bering judgemental of someone because you don't like how they look is what is ridiculous...not the look...
I believe you were the one to bring up the term, I was quoting you.
 
Renowned Anthropologist Margaret Mead was said to have observed:

"Always remember that you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else."
Brian - You're all individuals!
Crowd -- Yes, we're all individuals!
Brian - You're all different!
Crowd -- Yes! We are all different!
Man at back -- "I'm not"
 
I was at the Apple store on Saturday in suburban Boston area, as my wife was having some computer issues that needed addressing by the "Genius bar".

I saw a full fledged 24 year old lumberjack there. Big beard, red and black flannel shirt, jeans, LL Bean hunting boots.

Instead of judging him, I simply assumed that he was indeed a lumberjack there shopping for a new iPad. I felt like a better man because of it.
 
Hey folks.....it's Mardi Gras here in New Orleans. If ya wanna laugh & have some discourse about amusing garb, get over this way quick. It's a livin scream!,
 
Instead of judging, I decided that these young folks must simply have those dark circles under their eyes due to a raven a rap-tap tapping upon their chamber door one midnight dreary. Not a fashion choice, but rather a dark and mysterious gothic reality.



 

Shave_Rat

Moderator
Instead of judging, I decided that these young folks must simply have those dark circles under their eyes due to a raven a rap-tap tapping upon their chamber door one midnight dreary. Not a fashion choice, but rather a dark and mysterious gothic reality.



I do like the hat. If one is to pull off a top hat, you really have to commit to the whole outfit. Well done, I'll say.
 
[MENTION=6128]Seraphim[/MENTION] , I found this . A guy that's a real Lumberjack (of all trades) talking about it . It's funny , but true ...

 
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Bhugo

Contributor
With baggy jeans instead of tight ones, it could be called deer camp chic. Which I will be sporting in a few short weeks!
 
It did take longer than I expected it to in a thread like this. For the most part, at least, the general perception in the public is changing about how those of us with lots of tattoos or piercings are seen, which is a positive step. :)
When I got my septum done, no even batted an eye at it. Except to say "no more crazy piercings, Richard." It wasn't the piercings that you could see that caused a big reaction, but the one that you usually don't see that caused it, and that was just a "Richard, you have what?" And I live and work in a really small village.
 
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