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Movado wrist-watch's....your thoughts.

Austin

Moderator Emeritus
I told myself I'd buy a Rolex when I turned 40... Got 10 years to go. I think someone at my age would be perceived as trying too hard if I wore a Rolex. Just a little too cliche being a "nice" watch.

Not bad watches at all as a good deal of them are COSC certified. The main thing I don't like about Rollie is that make 700,000-1,000,000 pieces per year (IIRC). Not to mention the ton of fakes that are made each year.
I received my first Rolex when I was 29. I got it as a gift from a group of physicians I was working with. It was a beautiful gold two tone DateJust. I wore it once and put it away. I felt pretentious wearing it at such a young age. I sold it for a tidy sum. I did not buy another until I was 40.
 
There's several reason why to buy a Movado Museum style, it goes very well with your BMW, with that nice suit you're wearing. Every one notices you at the club, you're pretty soon tagged as a man with good taste, etc, etc.

A different story if you're wearing a Citizen
:lol::lol::lol::lol:

This is the funniest post I have ever seen! Thanks for brightening my gloomy, stormy day.

Seriously, this post is a good reason to stay away from Movados. That said, the "museum watch" is, like furniture designed by Marcel Breuer, Charles and Ray Eames, and Eillel Saarinen, a classic of high modern design still made today. So if you appreciate that minimalist aesthetic, by all means get one.

The problem with Movado is that they are in a price point that's just above Tissot, or other fashion brands like Kenneth Cole, and they have a very distinctive look. So they have a reputation as a "strivers" brand--for those who got a little money in their pocket and want to spend what they consider to be "the best", and will telegraph their wealth and taste to others, but actually have no idea what is "the best".

For cars, BMW 3-series, Mercedes C-class, most Infiniti models, and above all the Porsche Cayman represent this in cars.

If these people ever start making even more money, the Movado and 3 are replaced by the Rolex and 5-series. Both preform their functions well, Rolex makes tough little watches and 5 series are fun to drive. But that is all.
 
I received my first Rolex when I was 29. I got it as a gift from a group of physicians I was working with. It was a beautiful gold two tone DateJust. I wore it once and put it away. I felt pretentious wearing it at such a young age. I sold it for a tidy sum. I did not buy another until I was 40.
My cousin was given a Rolex by the Black Eyed Peas. The first time I saw it several years ago, his mother (my aunt) told me how he got it. I thought that was very nice and I had no clue who the Black Eyed Peas were. He works with the group as a contractor. Now they are fairly famous and apparently so is my cousin in certain circles of behind the scenes engineering types.
 
(somewhat) kidding aside, I could never bring myself to spend that much on a watch. First, I just never have, and most likely never will, have that kind of extra money for such a purchase. Second, watches never last long enough to justify that kind of money for me. But that's just me.
I have a Tag Heuer that I got somewhere around '93-94 ( I honestly forget the exact price but somewhere around the 6-800 range) and it has pretty much been an everyday watch for me ever since. I've worn it through all kinds of activities/work and on the occasions I felt it might be in extreme jeopardy I took it off. Only real thing I had done was replaced the crystal once only because while carrying in a heavy bag of something one day I scraped it against the corner of a brick front to a house getting through the door. Only other maintenance that has been done were new batteries every so often. Granted lifestyles will play a part on wear and tear but I'd say I got my money's worth out of it.
 
Originally Posted by sol92258
(somewhat) kidding aside, I could never bring myself to spend that much on a watch. First, I just never have, and most likely never will, have that kind of extra money for such a purchase. Second, watches never last long enough to justify that kind of money for me.


I'm sorry, but you're just wrong there. That's the same logic my friend had about "not wasting money on a straight" He was going to try to get one from a junk-shop "to see if he liked it" and no amount of begging with him and explaining how important it is to get a good, well-prepared one would wash. If you spend, oh I dunno, from Sinn-money up and keep it properly serviced and maintained, there is no reason for it ever to stop working. A good quart should last 25 years and won't be a lot to replace the movement either. My old gran used to say "buy quality and make it last". This is a maxim I have tried to live by, within my limited means.
 
Originally Posted by sol92258
(somewhat) kidding aside, I could never bring myself to spend that much on a watch. First, I just never have, and most likely never will, have that kind of extra money for such a purchase. Second, watches never last long enough to justify that kind of money for me.


I'm sorry, but you're just wrong there. That's the same logic my friend had about "not wasting money on a straight" He was going to try to get one from a junk-shop "to see if he liked it" and no amount of begging with him and explaining how important it is to get a good, well-prepared one would wash. If you spend, oh I dunno, from Sinn-money up and keep it properly serviced and maintained, there is no reason for it ever to stop working. A good quart should last 25 years and won't be a lot to replace the movement either. My old gran used to say "buy quality and make it last". This is a maxim I have tried to live by, within my limited means.
I've always tried to live by a similar motto which I've found to be applicable to many things which is: "Cheap is more expensive". There are plenty of times you try and take the cheap route on something, only to step up to a better quality product either through the cheap one breaking, or realizing that the better quality is what you'd rather have. So you essentially burn the money spent on the cheapo version.
 
I have a Movado SE for almost 10 years now. Until recently, it was the only watch with a face that I didn't hate. The movement is cheap but the durability of the band and the sapphire is great... few scratches on the stainless band and the crystal looks like the day I took it out of the box... perfect. I wore it every day for 7 straight years... with suit and shorts. I love my Movado and I'd buy it again without a second thought.

You guys can say what you want about the look but I wanted the simplest face with as little complication as possible. I've always felt that all those complications got in the way of the one piece of data I really need from my watch. The time.

The only other watch that truly intrigues me now is the Stowa. That is my second favorite face.
 
I have a Movado SE for almost 10 years now. Until recently, it was the only watch with a face that I didn't hate. The movement is cheap but the durability of the band and the sapphire is great... few scratches on the stainless band and the crystal looks like the day I took it out of the box... perfect. I wore it every day for 7 straight years... with suit and shorts. I love my Movado and I'd buy it again without a second thought.

You guys can say what you want about the look but I wanted the simplest face with as little complication as possible. I've always felt that all those complications got in the way of the one piece of data I really need from my watch. The time.

The only other watch that truly intrigues me now is the Stowa. That is my second favorite face.


All that matters is if you like it. The Stowa is on my list of watches to get in the near future.
 
Here is what I want to get out of my watch

#1 I want it to tell time

I don't want to have to reset it all the time.

#2 Look good for a long time

The style needs to be somewhat timeless and be able to take a little abuse with out looking old or worn.


#3 And yes, impressing someone is aways nice.

Thats not the most important, but it is nice went someone notices it's not from wal-mart.
 
people with more brains than money actually spend more than $30 on a watch?
wow













(somewhat) kidding aside, I could never bring myself to spend that much on a watch. First, I just never have, and most likely never will, have that kind of extra money for such a purchase. Second, watches never last long enough to justify that kind of money for me. But that's just me.

However, step out of my little circle and into yours, of the options you gave, I like the Citizen
My wife bought me a new Rolex for around $ 900 about 30 years ago as an engagement present.

I have the Air-King-Date, which was marketed only in the British Commonwealth.

It doesn't lose time, it looks like it is just out of the showroom and in all those years I've just had one service / cleaning....by a Rolex Technician.

I'm in my 60's now, got it in my 30's. When I shake off my mortal coil, my son will inherit and wear it.



I've checked the resale value (used) of the Air-King-Date and they have appreciated to over several times of what my wife paid for it, back 30 years ago.

New ones are worth even more.

It has lasted very long and shows no sign of not functioning.

There is no discoloration, no visible wear, it still maintains...exact...time.

I found other watches that I had before (different brands) would last anywhere from a year to about 9-10 years..tops.

When you buy real quality, it never costs, but pays in the long run.

I can't comment on other makes of watches, but in the case of the Rolex Air-King-Date....there is no doubt that this is a very fine timepiece.

Given the fact that I've had it for 30 years or so, only one cleaning and service....the original $ 900, when I divide by the number of years...is a pretty reasonable cost. I'm anticipating my son, might end up willing it to his progeny.....

I think this is the watch for those with reasonable money and brains.
 
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:lol::lol::lol::lol:

This is the funniest post I have ever seen! Thanks for brightening my gloomy, stormy day.

Seriously, this post is a good reason to stay away from Movados. That said, the "museum watch" is, like furniture designed by Marcel Breuer, Charles and Ray Eames, and Eillel Saarinen, a classic of high modern design still made today. So if you appreciate that minimalist aesthetic, by all means get one.

The problem with Movado is that they are in a price point that's just above Tissot, or other fashion brands like Kenneth Cole, and they have a very distinctive look. So they have a reputation as a "strivers" brand--for those who got a little money in their pocket and want to spend what they consider to be "the best", and will telegraph their wealth and taste to others, but actually have no idea what is "the best".

For cars, BMW 3-series, Mercedes C-class, most Infiniti models, and above all the Porsche Cayman represent this in cars.

If these people ever start making even more money, the Movado and 3 are replaced by the Rolex and 5-series. Both preform their functions well, Rolex makes tough little watches and 5 series are fun to drive. But that is all.
This is totally off topic, but i disagree with your car references. Sure, a bottom of the line c-class or 3 series would fall into that stereotype, but a c-class AMG or a 335 or M3 doesn't fall into that typecast at all, they're unique and purpose built... Also, i call bullocks 100% on the cayman reference. If you mean boxter, I'll buy into that, but Caymans are big money, nearly 911 price and i know about a half dozen folks who own them and they were purchased because they're just about the best handling car under $100k and they out handle the famed 911. Boxters are cheaper (and used they're DIRT cheap) and not nearly as "enthusiast focused" save for the spyder model. I don't get the infiniti reference either... maybe its an LA thing, but at least in these parts, that doesn't hold true at all... People around here pick them up when they want something nicer than a camary, but lower key and more reliable than a German car.

Lastly the 5 series reference doesn't make any sense either.... What other mid-sized luxury car exists which is rear wheel drive, has TONS of technology and handles beautifully for a car its size? Audi's don't have as much technology and are only AWD, none of the Japanese cars really fill that bill, so what are you left with? 5-series and E-class.

I don't have ANY of the cars listed, nor have i owned a car from any of those brands, but when i need to move from my 2-seater sports car, to a 5 seater sports sedan, you can bet it'll be either an AMG c-class, E-class or a 5 series. Why? Well, aside from a CTS-V (which gets attrocious gas mileage and has a brutal ride) there just aren't any oer interesting 4-door sedans under $80k out there.

Long rant short, the watch vs car reference just doesn't have weight. A Rolex is purchased for one of only 3 reasons. 1. You like the design/style and want to purchase the original not an homage 2. You want to show off the cache/statement of the brand 3. You are a collector. You buy a car for QUITE a few more reasons than the above,, and there are quite a few more factors at play.
 

Austin

Moderator Emeritus
This is totally off topic, but i disagree with your car references. Sure, a bottom of the line c-class or 3 series would fall into that stereotype, but a c-class AMG or a 335 or M3 doesn't fall into that typecast at all, they're unique and purpose built... Also, i call bullocks 100% on the cayman reference. If you mean boxter, I'll buy into that, but Caymans are big money, nearly 911 price and i know about a half dozen folks who own them and they were purchased because they're just about the best handling car under $100k and they out handle the famed 911. Boxters are cheaper (and used they're DIRT cheap) and not nearly as "enthusiast focused" save for the spyder model. I don't get the infiniti reference either... maybe its an LA thing, but at least in these parts, that doesn't hold true at all... People around here pick them up when they want something nicer than a camary, but lower key and more reliable than a German car.

Lastly the 5 series reference doesn't make any sense either.... What other mid-sized luxury car exists which is rear wheel drive, has TONS of technology and handles beautifully for a car its size? Audi's don't have as much technology and are only AWD, none of the Japanese cars really fill that bill, so what are you left with? 5-series and E-class.

I don't have ANY of the cars listed, nor have i owned a car from any of those brands, but when i need to move from my 2-seater sports car, to a 5 seater sports sedan, you can bet it'll be either an AMG c-class, E-class or a 5 series. Why? Well, aside from a CTS-V (which gets attrocious gas mileage and has a brutal ride) there just aren't any oer interesting 4-door sedans under $80k out there.

Long rant short, the watch vs car reference just doesn't have weight. A Rolex is purchased for one of only 3 reasons. 1. You like the design/style and want to purchase the original not an homage 2. You want to show off the cache/statement of the brand 3. You are a collector. You buy a car for QUITE a few more reasons than the above,, and there are quite a few more factors at play.
I'll put up my Miata against any of those any day or time. :laugh:
 
I've got a Citizen Eco-Drive diver that I've had and worn daily for about seven years now. I've beaten the holy hell out of it, but you'd never know, and it still works perfectly and looks at least 85% great. :lol:

Seriously, it's a tough watch that looks pretty nice. I'd buy another one in a second.
 
I wouldn't mind a BMW, but I'm not sure how well it would work out here. I live in the coldest city (over 600,000) in the world and although we have BMW's, Porsche (pronounced Por-shaa for you automotive philistines :biggrin1: ), Mercedes, etc.....I don't see too many (not sure if I've ever seen any) of them driving around in 30 to 35 below temps...that we get every year.

In our family, we have four relatively new vehicles... a Chevy Cobalt sedan, a Chevy pick up, a big Buick sedan and a Pontiac Vibe (Toyota Matrix clone).

The Vibe BTW, gets a bit iffy at very cold temps. Not sure Toyota has real cold, Canadian winters down yet.

The truck belongs to my son and he parks it for 8-10 hours a day, no plug for his block heater...sometimes out in 35 to 40 below weather...he works till 1:00 am and it always starts.

My big Buick sedan may not be able to lap the serpentine track at Nurburgring at record speed. But it goes through snow drifts with it's great traction control system and has the legendary Buick 90 degree 3.8 liter V6, which aside from being legendary, is a heavy cast iron weight over the drive wheels and starts.... always and readily at 35 below...sometimes plugged in, sometimes not and the heater is wonderful...within minutes you could toast weenies....exaggerating ..just a bit.

We get winter from late October till late March, early April.

A BMW M5, Mercedes AMG, I don't think will cut it in the dead of winter here, after a snowfall, with a cold front dropping temps into the 25 to 30 below range.

BTW, I'm a car / motorcycle enthusiast...also have a '67 Matchless 750cc Scrambler...Desert Sled, etc.

But I don't ride that in the middle of winter either.

I need what works for day in...day out....I need practicality, reliability, durability, comfort, heat, quiet cabin and something that can survive a real winter and almost 6 months of it.

Horses for courses.
 
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