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Most commonly used vintage razors in Australia

My dad and FIL both born in England so i don't know who to ask, what were the most commonly used vintage razors in Australia ?

Also what razors did the ANZAC troops in WW1 & 2 use ?
 
My dad and FIL both born in England so i don't know who to ask, what were the most commonly used vintage razors in Australia ?

Also what razors did the ANZAC troops in WW1 & 2 use ?
Advertisements in Australia across the years show all the common Gillette (and other brand) razors available for sale. Given the historic links to the "Mother Country' of England we have tended to have an over representation of the British made Gillettes. I have, for example, a British Bostonian presented to an Aussie who later served, obviously he never took the razor with him, as well as an open comb #15 set presented to a worker from their employer on enlistment.

Gillette made blades in Australia, out of a Melbourne factory, but never razors as far as I'm aware. I know that they were issued Techs in Vietnam but before then I think it would have been the normal razors of the time.

Thanks for the shout out @tim33z
 
Advertisements in Australia across the years show all the common Gillette (and other brand) razors available for sale. Given the historic links to the "Mother Country' of England we have tended to have an over representation of the British made Gillettes. I have, for example, a British Bostonian presented to an Aussie who later served, obviously he never took the razor with him, as well as an open comb #15 set presented to a worker from their employer on enlistment.

Gillette made blades in Australia, out of a Melbourne factory, but never razors as far as I'm aware. I know that they were issued Techs in Vietnam but before then I think it would have been the normal razors of the time.

Thanks for the shout out @tim33z
Well you are honestly the only one I could imagine who would be able to provide an answer! Kudos!!
 

ajkel64

Moderator
Thanks @Mark1966, most of the razors that I have picked up over the last few years here in Australia have been made in England. That explains quite a lot.
 
And for some reason most locally found Gillette fatboys are the 61 model.

Nearly every sunday market find has been brittish made. Better for us..they are better made than the US ones 😊
 

Legion

Moderator Emeritus
WW1 I think they mostly used Sheffield straights. During the Depression era it was Bengall, but also German razors like Gotta, Flik, etc.

WW2, a mix of Brit build Gillette, and other funny brands using the same DE blade.

Having said that, the amount of Gem SE style razors in the antique shops from the WW2 era, you have to think they were pretty heavily used as well.

My fathers razor from the Vietnam era was an aluminium handled Tech, and that was the first razor I ever used, as a lad. I found it while cleaning out his house a while ago, still where where I left it.
 
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Luc

Moderator Emeritus
I've seen a few Bengall while I was down under. They are common for sure!
 
As others have said, Cadman's Bengall was certainly the most popular British straight sold in Australia in the 20thC, followed by the Invicta made by Dickensons. Pre WWI there were also quite a few Joseph Rodgers blades but certainly not much sign of the two other Sheffield giants, Wostenholm and Wade & Butcher.

In the safety field, the British made Gillettes appear to have been the most popular, if the 2nd hand market is anything to go by. With regard to the Gillette adjustables, I've only seen US made examples here - admittedly in a small sample size:biggrin1: I'm sure there must be Fatboys and Slims made in England but none have crossed my desk yet. There seems also to be a never-ending supply of worn out Rolls Razors in our flea markets and antique stores. I suspect they were a popular present, used for a while and stuffed up, then put away to eventually find their way to the secondhand table.
 
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