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Moka pot

I got my hands on a small pack of Vietnamese 100% Robusta and that also worked very well in the Moka Pot. Poured a little full fat milk into it and it tasted like Moccachino - with a SERIOUS caffeine punch.

My usual Italian blends are composed of 20-50% Robusta but pure it’s just another level.
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
:cuppa: For anyone getting their feet wet with bagged espressos, I do think the Latin grind vs Italian grind bears investigation. We find most Italian ones bitter, preferring Latin grind Bustelo, Pilon and La Llave. But we are from south Florida, so. It's what we were brought up on.

Dunno, but it's cheap enough to find out! Latin ones should be $3-6. The "Supremo" versions of Bustelo and Pilon ARE very tasty indeed, but cost more.

AA
 

EclipseRedRing

I smell like a Christmas pudding
I got my hands on a small pack of Vietnamese 100% Robusta and that also worked very well in the Moka Pot. Poured a little full fat milk into it and it tasted like Moccachino - with a SERIOUS caffeine punch.

My usual Italian blends are composed of 20-50% Robusta but pure it’s just another level.
I received a few kg of 100% Robusta and 100% Arabica beans from the Philippines. I expected to enjoy the Arabica best, and indeed I found it very smooth, but it lacked flavour and character, something was missing, and ultimately it disappointed. The Robusta on the other hand I found far superior despite it being much less expensive and I now purchase Robusta or Robusta heavy blends instead of the pure Arabica that I once favoured. To use a shaving brush analogy - Arabica is the over processed, over priced, and over rated, but really rather boring, heavily gelled badger brush. In contrast, Robusta is the unprocessed, inexpensive, underappreciated, scrubby boar brush - hard going at first but wonderful once you get used to it. A blended coffee is presumably some sort of mistura 😀
 
I received a few kg of 100% Robusta and 100% Arabica beans from the Philippines. I expected to enjoy the Arabica best, and indeed I found it very smooth, but it lacked flavour and character, something was missing, and ultimately it disappointed. The Robusta on the other hand I found far superior despite it being much less expensive and I now purchase Robusta or Robusta heavy blends instead of the pure Arabica that I once favoured. To use a shaving brush analogy - Arabica is the over processed, over priced, and over rated, but really rather boring, heavily gelled badger brush. In contrast, Robusta is the unprocessed, inexpensive, underappreciated, scrubby boar brush - hard going at first but wonderful once you get used to it. A blended coffee is presumably some sort of mistura 😀
I can relate to coffee as a hobby and people geeking out on it but I can’t see myself going hunting for super exclusive single estate harvests and such or diving into the deep end of preparation methods. For me a blend - I like your Mistura expression - brings it together best. There are so many established Italian roasters aside from the big cooperations that deliver excellent quality at rather modest prices per kg.
 
I have an old Bialetti Kitty, made in Italy before manufacturing was moved to China. I find it best to use a slightly coarse grind, do not tamp at all, and start with very hot water and then use a very low heat. Coffee made this way is so strong compared to my DeLonghi Dedica that I have to add water to it Americano style else my hands are shaking for an hour after drinking it.

View attachment 1854352

How did I know yours would be the coolest of all? 🙂👍
 
I have an old Bialetti Kitty, made in Italy before manufacturing was moved to China. I find it best to use a slightly coarse grind, do not tamp at all, and start with very hot water and then use a very low heat. Coffee made this way is so strong compared to my DeLonghi Dedica that I have to add water to it Americano style else my hands are shaking for an hour after drinking it.

View attachment 1854352
Very cool tool and it looks to be stainless as opposed to aluminum. I know he said Al wasn't an issue, I still prefer using stainless as it does just that, stain - less and is easier to and polish if necessary, completely. Aluminum is a great conductor of heat, but cleaning it is a different story.
 
I love James Hoffman maybe it’s his soothing British voice and credentials. He has been highlighting immersion coffee and I’ve really been enjoying using this method.
I had a Clever Dripper for a minute and didn't quite like the method (combines immersion with pour over.) It's an interesting device.

I started off with and still have an AeroPress. Haven't used this in a while, but it does make a pretty good cup of coffee overall.

My standard reach is a Melitta pour over cone: light, simple, not a space hog and works to make a very clean cup.

Cheers!
 
Opened a fresh bag of beans, still have to fiddle a bit with the grind (Graef CM702).

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I really thought I had discarded the top portion of that post. Whoops.

I don't know, I took it to mean that it was a coffee pot for the masses, a staple for those either unable or unwilling to spend hundreds, or even thousands, on equipment...maybe with a change from "most" to "many", as I've heard that hundreds of millions of the Bialetti pots have been sold over nearly a century.
 

luvmysuper

My elbows leak
Staff member
If I wanted to try this - what would be the recommendation for a Moka Pot?

I was thinking along the lines of a Bialetti, I mean - Bialetti is the grand dad of Moka Pots, having bought the process from the original creator.
But two issues concerned me:
1. There was mention that they are made in China (though the current Amazon listing says they are made in Italy) so I am not sure what the country of origin really is.
2. It is aluminum, which I don't have a personal issue with, though some here have stated a preference for stainless steel.

I'm more interested in a high quality product than saving a few bucks and wanting something better later. Even if I don't take to it, a very nice unit would be easier for me to gift to someone rather than a cheap "try it, and you haven't lost anything if you don't like it" kind of thing.

What's the best unit for home use out there in your opinion?
 
If I wanted to try this - what would be the recommendation for a Moka Pot?

I was thinking along the lines of a Bialetti, I mean - Bialetti is the grand dad of Moka Pots, having bought the process from the original creator.
But two issues concerned me:
1. There was mention that they are made in China (though the current Amazon listing says they are made in Italy) so I am not sure what the country of origin really is.
2. It is aluminum, which I don't have a personal issue with, though some here have stated a preference for stainless steel.

I'm more interested in a high quality product than saving a few bucks and wanting something better later. Even if I don't take to it, a very nice unit would be easier for me to gift to someone rather than a cheap "try it, and you haven't lost anything if you don't like it" kind of thing.

What's the best unit for home use out there in your opinion?
I would combine the best of both worlds. A stainless steel Bialetti.

I have the regular one, and despite taking care of it there’s some crust and rust inside. I use it the way it is. I don’t even know if it’s dangerous or not. 🤣
 

luvmysuper

My elbows leak
Staff member
I would combine the best of both worlds. A stainless steel Bialetti.

I have the regular one, and despite taking care of it there’s some crust and rust inside. I use it the way it is. I don’t even know if it’s dangerous or not. 🤣
After some further review, it appears that the Aluminum Bialetti pots are made (substantially) in Italy, and the stainless steel ones are made in China.
The stainless also appear to be rounded rather than sharply angled, which does play a part in ease of assembly, especially if you're getting a little older and don't have the grip strength you used to have!
 
After some further review, it appears that the Aluminum Bialetti pots are made (substantially) in Italy, and the stainless steel ones are made in China.
The stainless also appear to be rounded rather than sharply angled, which does play a part in ease of assembly, especially if you're getting a little older and don't have the grip strength you used to have!
I’m going to be honest with you, I prefer the shape of the classic indeed.

I don’t find the SS that attractive, but you avoid the rusting and staining, specially when you haven’t used it for a while.

The rounded SS is a little difficult to assemble when you’re pouring boiling water inside instead of cold. The lack of corners makes it a little more challenging even when using a dish cloth (it gets hot real quick).

I think you can’t go wrong with either, both have some positives and negatives.

I’m sure you’ll enjoy the final result. I get a wonderful juice with Sumatra in the Moka.
 

EclipseRedRing

I smell like a Christmas pudding
I’m going to be honest with you, I prefer the shape of the classic indeed.

I don’t find the SS that attractive, but you avoid the rusting and staining, specially when you haven’t used it for a while.

The rounded SS is a little difficult to assemble when you’re pouring boiling water inside instead of cold. The lack of corners makes it a little more challenging even when using a dish cloth (it gets hot real quick).

I think you can’t go wrong with either, both have some positives and negatives.

I’m sure you’ll enjoy the final result. I get a wonderful juice with Sumatra in the Moka.
I agree completely, I have a round stainless steel Bialetti Kitty and after adding hot water it becomes very hot very quickly. I sometimes find the threads difficult to engage when trying to attach the top, while holding the round bottom piece with a cloth. Of course starting with cold water solves that problem but I find using hot water gives a better end result. I also have an aluminium Pezzetti moka pot and it is easier to assemble when hot as it has corners.
 

EclipseRedRing

I smell like a Christmas pudding
Thanks!
I'm thinking an Aluminum Bialetti in a size between their tiny and gigantic would be best!
I have a 4 cup pot and it makes barely enough to fill two small espresso cups. In practice it makes about half a regular coffee cup, which I then top up with hot water to make an Americano. It is perfect for one but for two persons I would recommend a 6 cup pot. Be aware that a moka pot is designed to be used with a full measure of water and coffee; trying to make only 3 cups in a 6 cup pot by using half the coffee and half the water simply does not work, or at least it does not work well. If you buy a 6 cup pot then you should make 6 cups every time. Many people buy a small pot for one or two persons, and also a larger pot for when guests arrive.
 

luvmysuper

My elbows leak
Staff member
I have a 4 cup pot and it makes barely enough to fill two small espresso cups. In practice it makes about half a regular coffee cup, which I then top up with hot water to make an Americano. It is perfect for one but for two persons I would recommend a 6 cup pot. Be aware that a moka pot is designed to be used with a full measure of water and coffee; trying to make only 3 cups in a 6 cup pot by using half the coffee and half the water simply does not work, or at least it does not work well. If you buy a 6 cup pot then you should make 6 cups every time. Many people buy a small pot for one or two persons, and also a larger pot for when guests arrive.
I ordered a 9 cup. As much coffee as we drink, it makes sense. The 12 cup was way too big!!
Also a small bag of Bialetti Intenso and Classico coffee.
If it works out, I'll look at a grinder and a bean source.
 

Old Hippie

Somewhere between 61 and dead
I used one of the generic cast aluminum ones for probably 25 years. Then I got this burning hole in my head about having a vacuum pot and started up my McGyver gene. :) The result was a Bialetti like the one @Tomo shows above and then I got out the power tools and started cutting. Once I cut out the centre standpipe on the upper part and did some cleanup, I had a vacuum pot.

Might not be your thing, but I've noticed that the coffee coming out of it is not bitter, quite smooth, and very enjoyable. It's a bit messy, but then so's a moka pot. Different technique.

I'll be on the road for a week or so, and Old Hippie's Hack-A-Vac is going along for the ride to provide my morning cuppajoe.

The above offered in case you decide to go lateral on your new moka pot...:)

O.H.
 

luvmysuper

My elbows leak
Staff member
The Bialetti arrived today, so I had to give it a trial run.
I watched this video first, to be clear on the "gurgle" thing.


I used double filtrated water (house filter, and fridge water dispenser filter), and pre-boiled the water, and used the Bialetti branded Intenso grounds.
The 9 cup Bialetti provided about 3 1/2 ounces each for the wife and I to enjoy, and enjoy we did!
It was a marvelous treat. The wife can be very critical about new experiences and new devices, but she's solidly sold on this purchase.
Thanks for the help and the advice.
With a little experience, making a pot will be second nature, and it's certainly worth the slightly increased effort.
 

Legion

Staff member
If I wanted to try this - what would be the recommendation for a Moka Pot?

I was thinking along the lines of a Bialetti, I mean - Bialetti is the grand dad of Moka Pots, having bought the process from the original creator.
But two issues concerned me:
1. There was mention that they are made in China (though the current Amazon listing says they are made in Italy) so I am not sure what the country of origin really is.
2. It is aluminum, which I don't have a personal issue with, though some here have stated a preference for stainless steel.

I'm more interested in a high quality product than saving a few bucks and wanting something better later. Even if I don't take to it, a very nice unit would be easier for me to gift to someone rather than a cheap "try it, and you haven't lost anything if you don't like it" kind of thing.

What's the best unit for home use out there in your opinion?
My aluminum Bialetti is probably older than I am, and apart from needing to replace the rubber gasket, it is still working flawlessly.
 
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