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Moka pot

I have never drunk espresso...until today.

After seeing a thread or two about moka pots, I went to Amazon out of curiosity and found this for just over 6 bucks, shipped to my door (the next day). Are you kidding me?...6 dollars?!?!

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Anyway...I washed it, ground up some beans on the fine side with my Timemore manual grinder, filled it with water, assembled it and put it on a small burner, medium flame...and it worked quite well.

The result was quite palatable...though I cannot say for certain how close it is to the "real deal" as I have never had espresso before...but it tasted pretty darn good and it was a gas to see this little pot work...and only 6 bucks...I'm amazed.
 
I have never drunk espresso...until today.

After seeing a thread or two about moka pots, I went to Amazon out of curiosity and found this for just over 6 bucks, shipped to my door (the next day). Are you kidding me?...6 dollars?!?!

View attachment 1854185

Anyway...I washed it, ground up some beans on the fine side with my Timemore manual grinder, filled it with water, assembled it and put it on a small burner, medium flame...and it worked quite well.

The result was quite palatable...though I cannot say for certain how close it is to the "real deal" as I have never had espresso before...but it tasted pretty darn good and it was a gas to see this little pot work...and only 6 bucks...I'm amazed.
I grind my beans less fine for the Bialetti than for the La Pavoni Lever.

Slightly overfilling the insert and then a little bit of leveling - no hard pressing or tamping.

Put on the stove over medium heat with the lid open. Once the foam/crema comes up I turn off the heat and pour. Don’t let it sputter as it will overheat and might turn the brew bitter.

I prefer a Neapolitan/darker roast and blends with a good portion of Robusta.
 
I grind my beans less fine for the Bialetti than for the La Pavoni Lever.

Slightly overfilling the insert and then a little bit of leveling - no hard pressing or tamping.

Put on the stove over medium heat with the lid open. Once the foam/crema comes up I turn off the heat and pour. Don’t let it sputter as it will overheat and might turn the brew bitter.

I prefer a Neapolitan/darker roast and blends with a good portion of Robusta.

Yeah...I know my hand grinder isn't really capable of a true espresso grind and still I backed it off a few clicks from its finest setting.

I poured the grinds into the basket and leveled it by scraping off the excess with the back of a butter knife, to make sure it wasn't packed in.

Really, it worked great...and the result was a concentrated version of the coffee from my Aeropress or a pour over, strong but not bitter at all.

I'm calling it a success, and $6 well spent. 😁👍
 
Very nice...it looks well loved.
Once in a while I contemplate getting their stainless model but this one works and the only part that has to be changed regularly is the sealing.

I try to pack the basket with a light finger but don’t do away with a slight < 0.5“ overfilling. Just play around with a couple brews to see what works best for you.
 
I had a close friend who swore by their Moka pot and was their method of choice for making coffee. I don't drink coffee regularly enough to buy one but it would be high on my list if I did. We have an induction stovetop so if we got one we'd have to get a steel one.

My friend always described it to others as a kind of "diluted espresso" which seemed fair to me. They meant it in a good way.
 
My friend always described it to others as a kind of "diluted espresso" which seemed fair to me. They meant it in a good way.

I'd say that's fair. Of course I have no benchmark regarding what espresso should taste like, but your description seems to fit what I'm getting from the pot.
 
Gents, rather interesting to see this thread pop up today. My mom bought a moka pot, tried it a couple of times and it's not for her so I'm getting it.

That said, my understanding is this in not a true espresso, given the pressure that an espresso machine is capable of and the very fine grind required.

I no longer consume caffeine for a variety of reason and have moved to decaf when I'm in the mood for the flavor. I've found some good organic decaf beans, though occasionally I really miss the single estate organic Mexican beans I was getting: damn good flavor. I'd access to a decent espresso machine at the time and made it from these beans: with some good heavy cream and a shot of Tequilla...need I say more.

James Hoffman is a coffee expert. I've watched many of his videos and rather enjoy his delivery and impressive experience and knowledge base. Perhaps this series (3 or 4 parts) will be of use:

 
The Moka pot is not espresso just to clarify GPJoe. If you ever want to dip your toe in espresso, let me know I am admittedly more of a coffee nerd than I am a shaving enthusiast.

So, I'm guessing the moka cup falls somewhere between espresso and "regular" coffee?...or completely different? I suppose the only way to find out for myself is to get an espresso at a coffee shop.

Either way, the moka pot coffee is definitely higher octane than my normal cuppa.
 

EclipseRedRing

I smell like a Christmas pudding
I have an old Bialetti Kitty, made in Italy before manufacturing was moved to China. I find it best to use a slightly coarse grind, do not tamp at all, and start with very hot water and then use a very low heat. Coffee made this way is so strong compared to my DeLonghi Dedica that I have to add water to it Americano style else my hands are shaking for an hour after drinking it.

1717056793854.png
 
Gents, rather interesting to see this thread pop up today. My mom bought a moka pot, tried it a couple of times and it's not for her so I'm getting it.

That said, my understanding is this in not a true espresso, given the pressure that an espresso machine is capable of and the very fine grind required.

I no longer consume caffeine for a variety of reason and have moved to decaf when I'm in the mood for the flavor. I've found some good organic decaf beans, though occasionally I really miss the single estate organic Mexican beans I was getting: damn good flavor. I'd access to a decent espresso machine at the time and made it from these beans: with some good heavy cream and a shot of Tequilla...need I say more.

James Hoffman is a coffee expert. I've watched many of his videos and rather enjoy his delivery and impressive experience and knowledge base. Perhaps this series (3 or 4 parts) will be of use:

I was about the link JH's method for moka pot, it's been my favorite way to make it. You're right on the nose @gpjoe, a moka pot is someplace between coffee and espresso. It's a great, and inexpensive, way to mix things up. This is more of a weekend thing for me.
 
I was about the link JH's method for moka pot, it's been my favorite way to make it. You're right on the nose @gpjoe, a moka pot is someplace between coffee and espresso. It's a great, and inexpensive, way to mix things up. This is more of a weekend thing for me.

Same here. I don't see myself drinking it every day, more of a "once in a while" change of pace.
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Love seeing the moka pots! wife uses one when she doesn't want to use "the big machine."

If new users want "espumita," the sugary foam atop that is so delicious, look for the "Cuban aunt method." It works. (BELOW)


AA
 
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Ad Astra

The Instigator

can't get the bold off, sorry, not intentional

_______________


What matters is the "espumita" ...

Cuban Aunt Method: Fill moka pot with cold tap water. Spoon grounds in until level; maybe tamp, maybe not.

On stove, burner on high.

Wait, wait wait. First tiny bit of coffee that bubbles up MUST be poured over the two spoonfuls of sugar in your little tin espresso pot. Mix into a THICK brown paste. Vigorously! Everyone in the house should hear that spoon whipping around the pot. Too much will make it mushy/not work. Thick paste. Takes practice.

Pour the rest of the coffee in over that delicious sugary brown paste. A fine cream or espumita forms ... pour to lucky family members and friends.

If you miss that first tiny bit of bubbling coffee - no cream or espumita. Just ordinary sweet espresso.
 
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