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Lupo stainless?

One last comparison to a standard Gillette 7oClock SS to a Kai SS extra wide blade(.009 inch or .23mm wider) the pictures explain the advantage if a fellow wants a little more blade exposure by just changing blades instead of shimming.
Some times a fellow wants a little more blade feel but not alarming amount.:a22:
View attachment 1284705 View attachment 1284706
Have some great shaves!
I want to buy lupo .72, but as i see many of the wet shavers on youtube prefer either GC .84 or lupo .95 over lupo .72, why is that?
 
I want to buy lupo .72, but as i see many of the wet shavers on youtube prefer either GC .84 or lupo .95 over lupo .72, why is that?


I have both the Lupo 72 (initial purchase) and a 95. The 72, for some reason, irritated my skin a little....something I don't get from my other razors. I read several posts where some were preferring the 95 to the 72 so I purchased the 95 base plate. Well, the 95 shaves smoother and more comfortable for me with no skin irritation. I really don't know why this is the case, but it is for me and a few others here. I can shave with the 95 daily as it's not aggressive...just smooth and efficient. A very nice razor for the money.

I have no experience with the GC .84.
 
I have both the Lupo 72 (initial purchase) and a 95. The 72, for some reason, irritated my skin a little....something I don't get from my other razors. I read several posts where some were preferring the 95 to the 72 so I purchased the 95 base plate. Well, the 95 shaves smoother and more comfortable for me with no skin irritation. I really don't know why this is the case, but it is for me and a few others here. I can shave with the 95 daily as it's not aggressive...just smooth and efficient. A very nice razor for the money.

I have no experience with the GC .84.
Maybe .95 shaves smooth and comfortable, but I'm afraid it has much blade feel for me, after one year with DE89 I need mild to aggressive razor.
 
I read that some liked the 95 more than the 72, so I got both plates to try - otherwise I would not have gotten the 95 plate. I find the 95 more comfortable than the 72, and the 95 is more efficient. I don't know why this is the case.

I find the GC 84 SB to be a bit more comfortable than the Lupo 95 while being a little less efficient. Everyone's face is different, but I can use either of these razors daily. The GC 84 is about the same efficiency as the Lupo 72 and the GC is more comfortable. At least this is my experience. So I prefer the Lupo 95 and the GC 84 over the Lupo 72.
 
I want to buy lupo .72, but as i see many of the wet shavers on youtube prefer either GC .84 or lupo .95 over lupo .72, why is that?
I personally like the 2nd Gen Lupo.72, I read the reviews on the 1st Gen Aluminum Lupo and the coated stainless steel Lupo and knew the Lupo.72 would be very close to those desired tolerances. Also I knew if there was not a enough blade feel I could slip in a Kai SS blade and have a very close shave & no need for the .95 base plate possibly. The Lupo.95 seems like a good razor for folks who want more a little more blade feel and with smoothness & efficentcy is what I have gathered. From the reviews on Italian barber the Lupo.72 is more talked about and is enjoyed by more than the Lupo.95. It's a personal preference, Lupo.72 is more a daily driver than the .95 IMO.
Have some great shaves!
 
I personally like the 2nd Gen Lupo.72, I read the reviews on the 1st Gen Aluminum Lupo and the coated stainless steel Lupo and knew the Lupo.72 would be very close to those desired tolerances. Also I knew if there was not a enough blade feel I could slip in a Kai SS blade and have a very close shave & no need for the .95 base plate possibly. The Lupo.95 seems like a good razor for folks who want more a little more blade feel and with smoothness & efficentcy is what I have gathered. From the reviews on Italian barber the Lupo.72 is more talked about and is enjoyed by more than the Lupo.95. It's a personal preference, Lupo.72 is more a daily driver than the .95 IMO.
Have some great shaves!
Thanks for your opinion, i will go for .72.
 
Maybe .95 shaves smooth and comfortable, but I'm afraid it has much blade feel for me, after one year with DE89 I need mild to aggressive razor.
I've got the 2 gamechanger sb's and the 2 Lupo sb's.I find the gamechanger .84 a little smoother than .72 Lupo.I also haven't found a blade the gamechanger doesn't like where as i find the Lupo is best suited to sharper blades.As always YMMV.
 
Another blade tested with the 95 SB: Treet Platinum Super Stainless. Medium sharp, quite smooth, just a hint of pulling because of the reduced sharpness (not like carts, but compared to the sharpest blades). One thing I didn't get is irritation or weepers, so I suppose the tradeoff on sharpness is worth it, if this is what you are looking for. I didn't expect the closest shave, and didn't even go for it, but the result were quite good after the cleanup pass. I got 3 shaves out of it (my usual milage), by the end of the 3rd shave it was ready to be retired.
This is how I imagined other blades like the (in)famous Voshkod: not really sharp but smooth. Except the Treet delivered and the Voshkod did not.
 
I don't notice any difference in blade feel between the 72 and 95. They feel identical to my skin on that front, with the 95 feeling a little smoother.
The blade exposure on the 72 is close to identical to the 95. This might explain why you experience the same amount of blade feel. What is different is the effective shaving angle and the gap. I think the difference in shaving angle is the most important factor between the two. the 72 requires a slightly steeper angle than the 95 (based on microscope photos). This is especially noticeable going against the grain, which in my opinion needs the blade to have a more shallow angle. For the first pass going with the grain the difference is less, because the beard tend to grow more parallel to the skin. A steeper cutting angle can therefore be more effective.
I have the dual comb version, which i tend to use the 72 side for the first pass, and follow up with the 0.95 side.
The photo on the right is from a member posted in a different thread. The right photo is the lupo 95.
It is quite clear that the angle of attack is quite different
1624347492377.png
 
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JCarr

More Deep Thoughts than Jack Handy
The blade exposure on the 72 is close to identical to the 95. This might explain why you experience the same amount of blade feel. What is different is the effective shaving angle and the gap. I think the difference in shaving angle is the most important factor between the two. the 72 requires a slightly steeper angle than the 95 (based on microscope photos). This is especially noticeable going against the grain, which in my opinion needs the blade to have a more shallow angle. For the first pass going with the grain the difference is less, because the beard tend to grow more parallel to the skin. A steeper cutting angle can therefore be more effective.
I have the dual comb version, which i tend to use the 72 side for the first pass, and follow up with the 0.95 side.
The photo on the right is from a member posted in a different thread. The right photo is the lupo 95.
It is quite clear that the angle of attack is quite different
View attachment 1285382

Wow! Thanks for your post. Very interesting. Lately, I've been preferring the .72 Lupo to the .95, but I find both to be excellent shavers.
 
Wow! Thanks for your post. Very interesting. Lately, I've been preferring the .72 Lupo to the .95, but I find both to be excellent shavers.
The photos might be a bit misleading. It seems like the saving angle is also quite close. That leaves only a small difference in the blade exposure caused by some gap difference.
I think if you compared the lupo 72 using a kai blade, which is 22.18 mm you would probably be quite close to the 95 with a smaller blade.
1624361384524.png
1624361343695.png
 
The photos might be a bit misleading. It seems like the saving angle is also quite close. That leaves only a small difference in the blade exposure caused by some gap difference.
I think if you compared the lupo 72 using a kai blade, which is 22.18 mm you would probably be quite close to the 95 with a smaller blade.

I think they might be identical razors except for the area shaded in light grey below. I believe the shave angle, shave plane, and blade exposure are identical for both razors. Only the guard muzzle area, guard span and gap are different. That's just a guess though. I already have a Lupo .72, and if the Canadian Post ever delivers my Lupo .95, I'll be able to test that theory (it's been 3 weeks for it travel 200 miles, and I just got a email notification that it's now 1,500 miles away). 🤣

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It's a work in progress. I haven't thought of a better name for it, but I think it's an important parameter influencing razor aggressiveness. It determines how much force is necessary to press the razor into your skin, therefore changing the effective shave plane, and therefore increasing the effective blade exposure. Strictly speaking, it's the area of the razor profile between the shave plane, and a parallel line drawn 0.10mm back towards the center of the razor (muzzle plane).

Here are two example razors that help to explain the concept. Imagine both razors have exactly the same gap, blade exposure, and shave angle. The blade exposure is negative -0.10mm. In order for either razor to shave at all, it's necessary to push them into the skin 0.10mm. This changes the effective blade exposure to perfectly neutral. The razor on the left has a massive surface area. It's going to be nearly impossible to push into your skin and probably won't shave at all. The razor on the right has a very small surface area, and will easily shave.

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The nominal blade exposure of a razor is equal to the effective blade exposure only on granite, because the shave plane remains constant, because the guard and cap can't be pushed into granite. Skin however is pliable and the razor can be pushed into it changing the effective shave plane, and therefore the effective blade exposure. This is why the first rule of shaving is "use zero pressure", because increasing pressure increases the effective blade exposure. How easily the effective blade exposure of a razor changes as a function of pressure is defined partly by the surface area of the guard area and cap area tangent to the shave plane. Pressure is just force/surface area. In practice however this is happening in a 3 dimensional space. The muzzle plane is the imaginary line 0.10mm back towards the center of the razor. The "muzzle area" is the area between the nominal shave plane and the muzzle plane. Take a look at these pictures to see what I mean when I say that the effective blade exposure changes as a function of pressure. The red line in the first pic (on granite) is the nominal shave plane. The red line in the second pic (on skin with pressure) is the effective shave plane that comes into play when pressure is involved.

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The muzzle area adds a 3rd dimension to surface area creating a volume measurement. Basically it's the volume of metal that it's necessary to push into your skin to change the effective blade exposure 0.10mm. It's relatively easy to measure the muzzle area using ImageJ software, by tracing the profile defined by muzzle plane. Like this:

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Here are three great example razors that show that the range of muzzle volume is very wide indeed. It's nearly impossible to change the effective blade exposure of the Henson (left), the razor on the right is moderately responsive to pressure, and the Timeless Slim in the picture below them requires a very light touch and expert control of pressure to avoid being bitten. All are great razors, but all respond differently to the same amount of pressure.

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It's a work in progress, and it needs a better name, but I think it has a great deal of influence on razor aggressiveness. Naming elements of razor geometry is much more in @ShavingByTheNumbers wheelhouse (I think he named half the terms we now commonly use!). I'm curious to hear your thoughts about what I'm attempting to describe above Grant, because you understand razor geometry and performance way better than I do.
 
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It's a work in progress. I haven't thought of a better name for it, but I think it's an important parameter influencing razor aggressiveness. It determines how much force is necessary to press the razor into your skin, therefore changing the effective shave plane, and therefore increasing the effective blade exposure. Strictly speaking, it's the area of the razor profile between the shave plane, and a line drawn 0.1mm back towards the center of the razor (muzzle plane).

Here are two example razors that help to explain the concept. Imagine both razors have exactly the same gap, blade exposure, and shave angle. The blade exposure is negative -0.10mm. In order for either razor to shave at all, it's necessary to push them into the skin 0.10mm. This changes the effective blade exposure to perfectly neutral. The razor on the left has a massive surface area. It's going to be nearly impossible to push into your skin and probably won't shave at all. The razor on the right has a very small surface area, and will easily shave.

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The nominal blade exposure of a razor is equal to the effective blade exposure only on granite, because the shave plane remains constant, because the guard and cap can't be pushed into it. Skin however is pliable and the razor can be pushed into it changing the effective shave plane, and therefore the effective blade exposure. This is why the first rule of shaving is "use zero pressure", because increasing pressure increases the effective blade exposure. How easily the effective blade exposure of a razor changes as a function of pressure is defined partly by the surface area of the guard area and cap area tangent to the shave plane. Pressure is just force/surface area. In practice however this is happening in a 3 dimensional space. The muzzle plane is the imaginary line 0.10mm back towards the center of the razor. The muzzle area is area between the nominal shave plane and the muzzle plane. Take a look at these pictures to see what I mean.

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The muzzle area adds a 3rd dimension to surface area creating a volume measurement. Basically it's the volume of metal that it's necessary to push into your skin to change the effective blade exposure 0.10mm. It's relatively easy to measure the muzzle area using ImageJ software, by tracing the profile defined by muzzle plane. Like this:

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Here are two great example razors that show that the range of muzzle volume is very wide indeed. It's nearly impossible to change the effective blade exposure of the Henson (left), the razor on the right is moderately responsive to pressure, and the Timeless Slim in the picture below them requires a very light touch and expert control of pressure to avoid being bitten. All are great razors, but all respond differently to the same amount of pressure.

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It's a work in progress, and it needs a better name, but I think it has a great deal of influence on razor aggressiveness.
Bravo!
Very well explained and
actually makes perfect sense.

... in few cases I’ve used the
term “ bar / cap radius “ for what
so elaborate you have described .

I’m not sure about any possible
name that should be given to this aspect of the DE razor geometry .

For sure ,
I’m more than convinced that affects directly the efficiency,safety and “user-
friendliness” of a DE razor.
 
Bravo!
Very well explained and
actually makes perfect sense.

... in few cases I’ve used the
term “ bar / cap radius “ for what
so elaborate you have described .

I’m not sure about any possible
name that should be given to this aspect of the DE razor geometry .

For sure ,
I’m more than convinced that affects directly the efficiency,safety and “user-
friendliness” of a DE razor.

Lol. Yeah, it's a terrible name but I can't think of what else to call it either. I named it while thinking about "what makes a razor bite?" I called it "muzzle area" and "muzzle volume", because they determine the incremental pressure necessary to cause a razor to "bite". Hence the name "muzzle".

There are a few other associated concepts with even dumber names like "The Demilitarized Zone", which is the imaginary line drawn parallel to the shave plane defined by the apex of the blade in a negative exposure razor. It's used in calculating the volume of guard & cap necessary to bring a negative exposure razor to neutral so it can start shaving. I'm not good at naming things. 🤣
 
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The blade exposure on the 72 is close to identical to the 95. This might explain why you experience the same amount of blade feel. What is different is the effective shaving angle and the gap. I think the difference in shaving angle is the most important factor between the two. the 72 requires a slightly steeper angle than the 95 (based on microscope photos). This is especially noticeable going against the grain, which in my opinion needs the blade to have a more shallow angle. For the first pass going with the grain the difference is less, because the beard tend to grow more parallel to the skin. A steeper cutting angle can therefore be more effective.
I have the dual comb version, which i tend to use the 72 side for the first pass, and follow up with the 0.95 side.
The photo on the right is from a member posted in a different thread. The right photo is the lupo 95.
It is quite clear that the angle of attack is quite different
View attachment 1285382

Thank you for this information....very informative.
 
Lol. Yeah, it's a terrible name but I can't think of what else to call it either. I named it while thinking about "what makes a razor bite?" I called it "muzzle area" and "muzzle volume", because they determine the incremental pressure necessary to cause a razor to "bite". Hence the name "muzzle".

There are a few other associated concepts with even dumber names like "The Demilitarized Zone", which is the imaginary line drawn parallel to the shave plane defined by the apex of the blade in a negative exposure razor. It's used in calculating the volume of guard & cap necessary to bring a negative exposure razor to neutral so it can start shaving. I'm not good at naming things. 🤣
Yes your thoughts are accurate when actually shaving IMO. Razor weight indentation or Razor pressure indentation.......... Muzzle area had me scratching the noggin a little when I first seen that photo but know we are on the same page. :a22:
 
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