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Looking for the stainless steel / titanium adjustable razor to replace all the razors that I have

Why does anyone need an adjustable razor? One day do you just change your mind about how you want to shave?
 
I can think of some reasons...
  • Want different settings for different shave areas (say, neck vs. face vs. head)
  • Want bigger gap for more days of growth
  • Like variety
  • Like adjustables because they are cool
I would also add that you can sometimes make a seemingly crappy blade a great blade. Oftentimes by experimenting with the settings, you can find a particular blade's "sweet spot."
 
The osprey is phenomenal. Almost as good as my slants and decidedly gentler. You could easily stop there
I'm salivating at the chance to try the ti osprey and ti blackbird. The osprey however seems like the one I'd Lean towards as it's just calling to me for a one and done jack of all trades razor.
 

Tirvine

ancient grey sweatophile
This is something like the quandary presented in (I think) Toy Story 2:

. . . Is it better for a toy to be played with (as it was intended to be played with), or to be kept "mint in box" ?

This question (related to "does an inanimate object have karma?") is not going to answered conclusively, here.<g>

But I've learned something: I forget that a razor has a finite "use lifetime" -- it does, eventually, wear out. I've never actually worn out a DE, but I can imagine it happening.

Thanks --

. Charles
There was a wonderful old toy store in the Rice Village in Houston, and it was run by three women who were holocaust survivors. Their selection of Steiff bears and other stuffed animals was amazing. I grew up with a Steiff bear, Edward, and we went to the store to get one for our child. We were queried by the women to make sure we were not collectors and the bear was truly for a child to play. We passed the test and got the bear. I loved those women and their principles.
 
I would vote for the Rockwell 6S. As stated, it's built like a tank and gives very smooth yet efficient shaves.

If I had to winnow down my collection, The 6S, the Parker Variant SB, and the Colonial General would be the top three.
 
HLS TAIGA Titanium is my recommendation! Close second recommendation is the Polished Osprey Ss. My Tatara Muramsa Ti and Rocnel Sailor 2022L are also good for me. For my Face Taiga Ti. I have the Osprey in Ss and won’t upgrade to Ti, since the Ss works so well and feels good in hand. I’m sure you can’t go wrong with the Ti Osprey.
 
I'm salivating at the chance to try the ti osprey and ti blackbird. The osprey however seems like the one I'd Lean towards as it's just calling to me for a one and done jack of all trades razor.
I've tried basically every razor under the sun. None of them equalled my slant razors. The blutt razor was close but the osprey edges it out slightly. Plus I have areas on my beard that really benefit from mildness and areas that benefit from slightly more efficiency. The osprey does this beautifully and with a blade that is clamped better than basically any other razor on the market. Currently saving my pennies for a ti version
 

ERS4

My exploding razor knows secrets
Tatrar Muramasa
It does fall on the mild side of the adjustable spectrum.
But this thing is magic, because it allows you to intuitively understand whether the current razor belongs to negative exposure/0 exposure/positive exposure, instead of guessing the skin feel of the blade based on the gap size.

And Muramasa can be easily disassembled and cleaned, there are no springs or tiny parts that can easily fly away, and each part has enough volume.
Yes it has an O ring, but its main purpose is to make sure the number is centered. I have tested that the razor works perfectly even with the O ring removed, and the O ring is not hard to find.
Yes, this thing is magic and probably one of the easiest to thoroughly maintain continuously adjustable razors of the modern era.

I say it again,this thing is magic.
274299036_4965111516861045_6885781861288753654_n.jpg
 
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Tatrar Muramasa
It does fall on the mild side of the adjustable spectrum.
But this thing is magic, because it allows you to intuitively understand whether the current razor belongs to negative exposure/0 exposure/positive exposure, instead of guessing the skin feel of the blade based on the gap size.

And Muramasa can be easily disassembled and cleaned, there are no springs or tiny parts that can easily fly away, and each part has enough volume.
Yes it has an O ring, but its main purpose is to make sure the number is centered. I have tested that the razor works perfectly even with the O ring removed, and the O ring is not hard to find.
Yes, this thing is magic and probably one of the easiest to thoroughly maintain continuously adjustable razors of the modern era.

I say it again,this thing is magic.
View attachment 1859185
The muramasa is a solid razor. But the clamping for whatever reason feels inferior to the osprey for me. The clamping looks perfect, but it just feels rougher to my beard. It does seem easier to maintain however
 
I've tried basically every razor under the sun. None of them equalled my slant razors. The blutt razor was close but the osprey edges it out slightly. Plus I have areas on my beard that really benefit from mildness and areas that benefit from slightly more efficiency. The osprey does this beautifully and with a blade that is clamped better than basically any other razor on the market. Currently saving my pennies for a ti version
Thank you so much , for the reply Seth. Can the osprey on level 1 actually shave on 3 passes? I'm wanting the ti osprey badly but also want to try the ti bird as I said. However the osprey with it's wide range of performance, mild to wild range of choices and the fact that I can use one side of each blade due to the number dial and blackland label, really really makes me just want to punt and say screw it, osprey over everything else haha
 

ERS4

My exploding razor knows secrets
The muramasa is a solid razor. But the clamping for whatever reason feels inferior to the osprey for me. The clamping looks perfect, but it just feels rougher to my beard. It does seem easier to maintain however
From an engineering perspective, Muramasa has no issues with blade clamping.
Its clamping surface is very accurate and close to the edge of the blade.
The Nodachi that Tatara piled up earlier has proven to be very effective against thick/lush beards, and the aggressiveness set by Muramasa is even slightly higher than that of Nodachi.

Therefore, I guess that the reason why this razor is often described as a mild trend is that it provides some negative exposure options.
On the other hand, in order to accommodate the innovative adjustment system, it lacks the central area of the lather channel, thus increasing the chance of clogging and requiring more frequent flushing or the use of smoother lather.
This may be a relatively direct impact.

In addition, because Muramasa's adjustment method is not to directly increase the gap, users who are accustomed to large gap razors will also want to season it a little more heavily.

------
The Osprey is great, especially as Shane mentioned that the controller concept came from the Taipei 101; I live in Taipei and was very attracted to it.

However, it uses custom-made springs with special specifications, and is temporarily not open to users for disassembly and cleaning, which is a worry for me. After all, I once encountered an internal blockage in a second-hand Gillette Slim. (It would be a plus for me if Blackland actually came out with the special disassembly tool Shane describes in the video)

At the same time, you need to loosen the handle when adjusting this razor, which does affect the smoothness of the operation; although Shane gave an example of Gillette Adjustable to explain, there are already too many adjustable razors that can be adjusted directly without loosening, and there is no need to worry about the looseness of the turntable. There is no reason for us to use the completely different adjustment mechanism (TTO) 70 years ago as a comparison.

I think the Osprey looks great and would love to own one, but I hope it has some minor design changes and maybe wait for the second version.
 
Thank you so much , for the reply Seth. Can the osprey on level 1 actually shave on 3 passes? I'm wanting the ti osprey badly but also want to try the ti bird as I said. However the osprey with it's wide range of performance, mild to wild range of choices and the fact that I can use one side of each blade due to the number dial and blackland label, really really makes me just want to punt and say screw it, osprey over everything else haha

I don't know what the Osprey is like on 1-2, I've only shaved using 3-6. I don't think I will need outside that range, but they are always there if I do. Because it is a continuous adjustable, like others, one can choose any point in its range.

The same thing for my Muramasa, I don't think I'll use the Nodachi-level options, that's too much for me. I do find it odd that some say the Muramasa is too mild, but few say the Nodachi is too mild. 🤷‍♂️
 
From an engineering perspective, Muramasa has no issues with blade clamping.
Its clamping surface is very accurate and close to the edge of the blade.
The Nodachi that Tatara piled up earlier has proven to be very effective against thick/lush beards, and the aggressiveness set by Muramasa is even slightly higher than that of Nodachi.

Therefore, I guess that the reason why this razor is often described as a mild trend is that it provides some negative exposure options.
On the other hand, in order to accommodate the innovative adjustment system, it lacks the central area of the lather channel, thus increasing the chance of clogging and requiring more frequent flushing or the use of smoother lather.
This may be a relatively direct impact.

In addition, because Muramasa's adjustment method is not to directly increase the gap, users who are accustomed to large gap razors will also want to season it a little more heavily.

------
The Osprey is great, especially as Shane mentioned that the controller concept came from the Taipei 101; I live in Taipei and was very attracted to it.

However, it uses custom-made springs with special specifications, and is temporarily not open to users for disassembly and cleaning, which is a worry for me. After all, I once encountered an internal blockage in a second-hand Gillette Slim. (It would be a plus for me if Blackland actually came out with the special disassembly tool Shane describes in the video)

At the same time, you need to loosen the handle when adjusting this razor, which does affect the smoothness of the operation; although Shane gave an example of Gillette Adjustable to explain, there are already too many adjustable razors that can be adjusted directly without loosening, and there is no need to worry about the looseness of the turntable. There is no reason for us to use the completely different adjustment mechanism (TTO) 70 years ago as a comparison.

I think the Osprey looks great and would love to own one, but I hope it has some minor design changes and maybe wait for the second version.

Some clarification. The Osprey does not use a custom spring. But more importantly, the spring isn’t critical to the function of the razor. It’s only there to add some tension to the knob so it feels better to adjust. If the spring somehow broke in 50 years, you could technically keep using the razor just fine.

It’s true that you have to loosen the handle to adjust the razor. We see that as a feature and not a bug.

Both of these features are crucial to the Osprey design and would not be changed even if a subsequent version were to be released in the coming years.

Hope that adds some clarity!
 
Some clarification. The Osprey does not use a custom spring. But more importantly, the spring isn’t critical to the function of the razor. It’s only there to add some tension to the knob so it feels better to adjust. If the spring somehow broke in 50 years, you could technically keep using the razor just fine.

It’s true that you have to loosen the handle to adjust the razor. We see that as a feature and not a bug.

Both of these features are crucial to the Osprey design and would not be changed even if a subsequent version were to be released in the coming years.

Hope that adds some clarity!
Is it true that it's not possible for the user to disassemble it though? Could cause issues if in 50 years or what have you blackland isn't around lol though I truly hope so :)
 
From an engineering perspective, Muramasa has no issues with blade clamping.
Its clamping surface is very accurate and close to the edge of the blade.
The Nodachi that Tatara piled up earlier has proven to be very effective against thick/lush beards, and the aggressiveness set by Muramasa is even slightly higher than that of Nodachi.

Therefore, I guess that the reason why this razor is often described as a mild trend is that it provides some negative exposure options.
On the other hand, in order to accommodate the innovative adjustment system, it lacks the central area of the lather channel, thus increasing the chance of clogging and requiring more frequent flushing or the use of smoother lather.
This may be a relatively direct impact.

In addition, because Muramasa's adjustment method is not to directly increase the gap, users who are accustomed to large gap razors will also want to season it a little more heavily.

------
The Osprey is great, especially as Shane mentioned that the controller concept came from the Taipei 101; I live in Taipei and was very attracted to it.

However, it uses custom-made springs with special specifications, and is temporarily not open to users for disassembly and cleaning, which is a worry for me. After all, I once encountered an internal blockage in a second-hand Gillette Slim. (It would be a plus for me if Blackland actually came out with the special disassembly tool Shane describes in the video)

At the same time, you need to loosen the handle when adjusting this razor, which does affect the smoothness of the operation; although Shane gave an example of Gillette Adjustable to explain, there are already too many adjustable razors that can be adjusted directly without loosening, and there is no need to worry about the looseness of the turntable. There is no reason for us to use the completely different adjustment mechanism (TTO) 70 years ago as a comparison.

I think the Osprey looks great and would love to own one, but I hope it has some minor design changes and maybe wait for the second version.
It's not about mildness. I used the osprey on setting 2. I like mild razors. But the muramasa just doesn't feel as well clamped as the osprey to my face. Why? I have no idea. It looks ergonomically like it's clamped just as well but in practice the osprey feels smoother. In fact the osprey is the only razor that's ever been smoother than my slant razors and far far gentler. I've tried basically every modern de
 

ERS4

My exploding razor knows secrets
Some clarification. The Osprey does not use a custom spring. But more importantly, the spring isn’t critical to the function of the razor. It’s only there to add some tension to the knob so it feels better to adjust. If the spring somehow broke in 50 years, you could technically keep using the razor just fine.

It’s true that you have to loosen the handle to adjust the razor. We see that as a feature and not a bug.

Both of these features are crucial to the Osprey design and would not be changed even if a subsequent version were to be released in the coming years.

Hope that adds some clarity!
It turns out that I was overthinking the spring thing. If the wave spring is not a special specification, that is really great news. Thank you very much for the clarification. 😍

As for the "locking function" of the handle, I never said it was a "bug", but it did add steps + affect the smoothness of the operation adjustment. I would say this even on the Gillette fatboy/slim, and:
1. There are also some contradictory discussions in the thread in B&B that the Gillette adjustable "needs to be loosened first and then adjusted VS does not need to be loosened". (I couldn't adjust the Gillette without loosening it, not sure how they did it)
2. Many adjustable razors will not loosen arbitrarily even if they do not have a "locking function", including vintage and modern razors.

But it doesn't matter, it's just my personal nitpicking, you guys have done a great, great job, designers don't have to perfect everyone's preferences.
 
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