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Loading from tub bad for a croap?

I’ve seen a couple of comments lately that it’s better to scrape a small amount of croap into a lather bowl than to take a wet brush to the original container. One of these comments was from the originator of the Ethos brand.

I believe the argument is that introducing water to the original container from the wet brush has some detrimental effect on the croap long term.

What say ye croap aficionados? I intentionally bloom some of my hard soaps to aid loading, and obviously that’s not necessary with soft soaps. And of course I don’t want my croap to turn to soup. But is a smaller change to the moisture level in a croap’s container harmful to the performance or longevity of the product?
 
I use only triple milled hard soaps and have never bloomed them as I have never needed or wanted to do so. When I used soft soaps and creams I loaded the damp brush straight from the tub and never had a problem. But, I always had a small rotation of soaps and creams and never went more than a few days between uses. I do not think soaps or creams are intended to he used once every few months as part of a huge rotation over many years but if you do then I would avoid introducing water into the tub.
 
I’ve seen a couple of comments lately that it’s better to scrape a small amount of croap into a lather bowl than to take a wet brush to the original container. One of these comments was from the originator of the Ethos brand.

I believe the argument is that introducing water to the original container from the wet brush has some detrimental effect on the croap long term.

What say ye croap aficionados? I intentionally bloom some of my hard soaps to aid loading, and obviously that’s not necessary with soft soaps. And of course I don’t want my croap to turn to soup. But is a smaller change to the moisture level in a croap’s container harmful to the performance or longevity of the product?
I’ve loaded both ways and prefer the scrape out method. It guarantees a consistent amount of soap is used each shave. I didn’t see any detrimental effect to introducing a little water from the brush. It evaporates pretty quickly. I don’t leave my croaps open to the air after shaving. I have discovered that they dry out easily and never seem to be the same thereafter.
 
I prefer the scrape method. Keeps everything clean and dosed.

I only loaded like that on stirling pre shave soap and hard soap which I could not grate due to the container. Which I let air dry.

But in general storing a soft soap wet and warm makes it deteriorate quicker especially if there is not much left. And it starts getting gooey and funky
 
As I only have one tub of stirling black ice (it was a limited or seasonal scent I believe) I have always transferred enough for a week or so to an open Wilkinson blue tub. I loaded direct from there. As I enjoy the scent I wanted to preserve it. Also stirling soap is hard to get/expensive outside the US, I picked this one up from Pasteur's when I visited NY.

Perhaps I inadvertently was doing it correctly?
 
I load the brush from the container and gently scoop out any ather over the surface of soap, then I leave the soap/ croap to dry out with lid partially covered till moisture dries (usually 2-3 hours), then lid is covered.

I'm inclined to agree that scooping out will be cleaner method, which in turn may preserve the original scent of the soap/ croap but, I worry about over scooping, so, I load from the bowl.

Ps : I've used RazoRock Puros, Tabac Original, Barrister and Mann Hallows, PaNee Bergamot Mystery, Hajamat Natural, Trigodon Soaps, Catie's Bubbles as yet.

Of these, B & M Hallows, RazoRock Puros, Catie's Bubbles and Trigodon are soft soaps, others are more firm soaps.
 
Just as with all things wet shaving, opinion is divided here! But I appreciate the responses.

For those of you who scrape, what is your scraping tool of choice? I've tried a little espresso spoon, and it works for consistently getting an appropriately small quantity. But some soap sticks to he spoon. I can scrape the residue off with my fingers and then rub it into my stubble as a preshave, but I prefer not to get my hands slick before grabbing my brush. I also find the little blob in my lather bowl can take quite some time to transform all the way into lather, even when using plenty of warm water. Sometimes I think I've gotten it all only to discover at the end of my shave that there was still a small unincorporated mass hiding under the lather.

I'm thinking a mini plastic flexible spatula might work better than the espresso spoon as I'd be able to smear the croap into a thin layer and maybe have an easier time of wiping the residue on the edge of my lather bowl or onto my brush. Any suggestions?
 
As I only have one tub of stirling black ice (it was a limited or seasonal scent I believe) I have always transferred enough for a week or so to an open Wilkinson blue tub. I loaded direct from there. As I enjoy the scent I wanted to preserve it. Also stirling soap is hard to get/expensive outside the US, I picked this one up from Pasteur's when I visited NY.

Perhaps I inadvertently was doing it correctly?
Tip: top of the chain Canada, shavingtime uk (tax free), gifts and care Spain, scheersalon/manandshaving Netherlands.
The first ones have the most.
 
From the tub for me. I might scoop on the initial shave with a new soap as it is easier to sell a soap that wasn’t lathered in the tub, but that’s it. I have never actually sold a soap yet in any case.
Same here. I have had the scent turn on a couple of soaps (Cella being one of them) but I think that was because I wasn't allowing them to fully dry before closing up the container. I've seen quite a few soap makers comment that it shouldn't matter as long as you aren't dousing it in a ton of water and you're letting it dry out for at least a few hours before closing it up. Most agree that it shouldn't significantly affect the scent, and it can actually make the soap last a bit longer as it will harden a bit as it dries out.
 
Same here. I have had the scent turn on a couple of soaps (Cella being one of them) but I think that was because I wasn't allowing them to fully dry before closing up the container. I've seen quite a few soap makers comment that it shouldn't matter as long as you aren't dousing it in a ton of water and you're letting it dry out for at least a few hours before closing it up. Most agree that it shouldn't significantly affect the scent, and it can actually make the soap last a bit longer as it will harden a bit as it dries out.
I leave all of my soap containers open for a few hours if not overnight after shaving. I have never had one go bad yet. 🤞
 

ajkel64

The Aussie Bulldog
Moderator
I am with @BigFoot on this. Either way works for me as well unless I am using my Captain’s Choice Copper Lather Bowl. Then it’s a scoop on the fingers.
 
I use a spoon, I get the exact right amount everytime. It keeps the product perfect and doesn't introduce crud, bacteria and other stuff like hair from brushes or stubble if you need a bit more because you were short in loading up.

Precise amount without residue left in the tub from the last time you loaded up.

Unless it is a hard soap and you need to load up from the container I say it's less hygienic, you don't know the amount as you might load up too little or too much and flush it down the drain so wastage is also an issue. On the point of wastage, I generally don't like to be overly wasteful, it was ingrained in me to be respectful and utilitarian. Luxury shaving product aren't cheap for many people and if you like it then why waste it down the drain?
 
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