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Lens Advice Needed

Hi All,

I had a strong photography background but that was more than 25 years ago. I went to school for photo journalism and did more than a few weddings, rock bands, etc. before I got married.

For SLRs, I always owned a 28mm wide angle, a fast 50mm (1.4 usually), a 115 portrait lens and a few zooms. I sold my Nikon FE and FM and my Hasselblad many years ago and haven’t owned a good camera setup since…. but will be buying a new camera soon.

Man, have things in the camera world have changed in 25 years! I am unsure what to buy.

I need some advice as it seems that in this new world of DSLRs, a 22mm is like an old 35mm SLR lens, a 50mm is more like 80mm, etc.

I am likely buying a Canon EOS M50 as it is inexpensive and does everything I need a camera to do. I am usure about which lenses I should add. The body I am considering comes with a Canon 15-45mm zoom, so I will get that as the package isn’t much more than just the body. I am also looking at a 22mm, a cheap fisheye and likely a 50-200mm zoom.

I will be using this camera for vacations, family get together and maybe a bit of nature and sports.

Any advise or thoughts?

Thanks!
 
Sir SharpieB, Welcome back to the fold!

Do you have a smart phone? Which?

FWIW, my suggestion is to get up to speed with Adobe Photoshop (or equivalent) and digital processing!
The current crop of smart phones produce outstanding images, just perfect for vacations and family gatherings.
Not to mention video! And now macro!
For nature and sports, you can go the route of longer lenses, but you probably know that's a different world.
As I'm not in the Canon camp, I could not offer any specifics on the kit you described.
However, there are some amazing all-in-one digital cameras, from all the usual suppliers.
Enjoy your new endeavors!
 
Sir SharpieB, Welcome back to the fold!

Do you have a smart phone? Which?

FWIW, my suggestion is to get up to speed with Adobe Photoshop (or equivalent) and digital processing!
The current crop of smart phones produce outstanding images, just perfect for vacations and family gatherings.
Not to mention video! And now macro!
For nature and sports, you can go the route of longer lenses, but you probably know that's a different world.
As I'm not in the Canon camp, I could not offer any specifics on the kit you described.
However, there are some amazing all-in-one digital cameras, from all the usual suppliers.
Enjoy your new endeavors!
Thanks for the reply. I use iPhones and the picture quality IS getting pretty damned good. I do enjoy a camera in my hand though.

I will check out photoshop as it has been a while since I did any photo editing.
 
I don't have any experience with the Canon M system, but here are my thoughts on it.

First off I've been a micro four thirds shooter for around 3 years (Panasonic GX85). Since I started shooting it I've heard rumors that it is a dying or dead system and that everything will eventually go to full frame for better lowlight performance and shallower depth of field. I've been perfectly happy with my camera for my needs and price is much more in my budget than full frame (at least for now). Canon M is a larger sensor than mine and has more megapixles so it should be better tan what I'm already happy with. So I would have no worries about image quality of the Canon. Where I would have concerns is whether the system will still be around in a few years. Canon hasn't put too many lenses out for as long as the system has been around. There may already be enough and there are third party options too so it may still be a viable option for you, but I wouldn't expect to see very many more options coming out for canon as they will most likely be putting most of there efforts into their new R line. I would really look at what is available for the system and decide if it is enough for you and look at other options before buying into this one.

As far as how I feel about being in a a dying/dead system. I figure I will most likely eventually go to full frame if/when prices come down. But not ready to jump ship anytime soon I actually just went in a little deeper with a very lightly used Panasonic GX9 a week ago.
 
Hi All,

I had a strong photography background but that was more than 25 years ago. I went to school for photo journalism and did more than a few weddings, rock bands, etc. before I got married.

For SLRs, I always owned a 28mm wide angle, a fast 50mm (1.4 usually), a 115 portrait lens and a few zooms. I sold my Nikon FE and FM and my Hasselblad many years ago and haven’t owned a good camera setup since…. but will be buying a new camera soon.

Man, have things in the camera world have changed in 25 years! I am unsure what to buy.

I need some advice as it seems that in this new world of DSLRs, a 22mm is like an old 35mm SLR lens, a 50mm is more like 80mm, etc.

I am likely buying a Canon EOS M50 as it is inexpensive and does everything I need a camera to do. I am usure about which lenses I should add. The body I am considering comes with a Canon 15-45mm zoom, so I will get that as the package isn’t much more than just the body. I am also looking at a 22mm, a cheap fisheye and likely a 50-200mm zoom.

I will be using this camera for vacations, family get together and maybe a bit of nature and sports.

Any advise or thoughts?

Thanks!

All good advice from above but I have one question, what is your budget? For me this determines what type of equipment I use and recommend.

Nature and Sports you are going to need a FAST aperture, shutter speed with a raised ISO or you will get blur...
 
My advice would be look at what Fujifilm have to offer. Their image quality is great, it what really separates them is their range of seriously excellent lenses.

The lenses will, on average, be more expensive than Canon, but if you a planning to stick with the hobby, you will not be tempted to upgrade all your gear in a couple of years.
 
I don't have any experience with the Canon M system, but here are my thoughts on it.

First off I've been a micro four thirds shooter for around 3 years (Panasonic GX85). Since I started shooting it I've heard rumors that it is a dying or dead system and that everything will eventually go to full frame for better lowlight performance and shallower depth of field. I've been perfectly happy with my camera for my needs and price is much more in my budget than full frame (at least for now). Canon M is a larger sensor than mine and has more megapixles so it should be better tan what I'm already happy with. So I would have no worries about image quality of the Canon. Where I would have concerns is whether the system will still be around in a few years. Canon hasn't put too many lenses out for as long as the system has been around. There may already be enough and there are third party options too so it may still be a viable option for you, but I wouldn't expect to see very many more options coming out for canon as they will most likely be putting most of there efforts into their new R line. I would really look at what is available for the system and decide if it is enough for you and look at other options before buying into this one.

As far as how I feel about being in a a dying/dead system. I figure I will most likely eventually go to full frame if/when prices come down. But not ready to jump ship anytime soon I actually just went in a little deeper with a very lightly used Panasonic GX9 a week ago.

I would agree with you whole hardheartedly, your current camera is capable at 16 megapixels. More than enough for imaging macro or micro. Newer full frame would make me kick myself in the butt when the prices come down a year or two from now. I always stay a few years behind anyway, currently have a Canon T3i and it is more than sufficient being several years old. Unless you are doing photography for a living, having the latest and greatest isn't all that 'oooooooooo' and 'aaaahhhhhh'.

As a side note all OSC cameras should be divided by 4 anyway (RGGB bayer matrix) so the marketing gimmick of '16', '20' pixels actually correlates to only 4 or 5 megapixels anyway...

AS another side note and Warning: My other camera is a monochromatic 8 megapixel camera and the only limit to megapixels is the number of filters I image through, currently have 7 filters, Gen 'E' Astrodon L,R,G,B, and Ha, OIII, SII in the 3nm band for night time imaging. 16 gig 56 megapixel images take a little more than Lightshop to process... Use a program called PixInsight for those.

Just don't start imaging at night...

Once you go to the dark side forever will it consume your destiny.
 
Hi All,

I had a strong photography background but that was more than 25 years ago. I went to school for photo journalism and did more than a few weddings, rock bands, etc. before I got married.

For SLRs, I always owned a 28mm wide angle, a fast 50mm (1.4 usually), a 115 portrait lens and a few zooms. I sold my Nikon FE and FM and my Hasselblad many years ago and haven’t owned a good camera setup since…. but will be buying a new camera soon.

Man, have things in the camera world have changed in 25 years! I am unsure what to buy.

I need some advice as it seems that in this new world of DSLRs, a 22mm is like an old 35mm SLR lens, a 50mm is more like 80mm, etc.

I am likely buying a Canon EOS M50 as it is inexpensive and does everything I need a camera to do. I am usure about which lenses I should add. The body I am considering comes with a Canon 15-45mm zoom, so I will get that as the package isn’t much more than just the body. I am also looking at a 22mm, a cheap fisheye and likely a 50-200mm zoom.

I will be using this camera for vacations, family get together and maybe a bit of nature and sports.

Any advise or thoughts?

Thanks!
The 15-45mm kit lens is a nice general purpose piece of glass. If you appreciate a good prime, take a look at the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN. For nature and sports, the Canon 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM would be a solid choice.
 
I sold off all my old full-frame Olympus equipment some years ago (two OM-1s and an OM3 along with a full set of lenses) and bought two Olympus micro 4/3 camera bodies (both EM5s) and a bunch of lenses (mostly used, some new). From memory, I have a 17, a 25, a 45, a 60 macro, a 75, a 75-300, and a 40-150 kit lens. I love not having to lug around 30 pounds of equipment. Instead, I can easily carry two bodies and 3-4 lenses without breaking a sweat. The rumors are always around, but I don’t worry about them. One other point: although I kept my Gitzo steel Reporter tripod (8 pounds), I don’t need it very often. Image stabilization works like a charm.
 
The 15-45mm kit lens is a nice general purpose piece of glass. If you appreciate a good prime, take a look at the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN. For nature and sports, the Canon 55-200mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM would be a solid choice.
Thanks @Wogus . Funny, I read this post just after I went shopping, but great advice! You pretty much nailed my shopping list.

I played around with a few bodies and lenses and really liked the M50 Mark II. Bought it with the included 15-45, the Sigma 30mm 1.4, the 55-200 Canon zoom and the Canon 22mm f/2.0.

I ended up getting a good deal and for what I will be shooting (vacation, nature, family, and maybe a SOTD or three) the timing (price) on a mirrorless/full frame just doesn’t work.

Also, my son just bought a M200 (same EF-M lenses), so that sealed the deal as we can share lenses.

All input was greatly appreciated!
 
Thanks @Wogus . Funny, I read this post just after I went shopping, but great advice! You pretty much nailed my shopping list.

I played around with a few bodies and lenses and really liked the M50 Mark II. Bought it with the included 15-45, the Sigma 30mm 1.4, the 55-200 Canon zoom and the Canon 22mm f/2.0.

I ended up getting a good deal and for what I will be shooting (vacation, nature, family, and maybe a SOTD or three) the timing (price) on a mirrorless/full frame just doesn’t work.

Also, my son just bought a M200 (same EF-M lenses), so that sealed the deal as we can share lenses.

All input was greatly appreciated!

Awesome! Sounds like you already have a pretty complete kit, that should serve you well. Hope to see some shots soon.
 
As to lenses ... the body you name is a crop sensor with a 1.6x factor so a 22mm has the same field of view as a 35mm lens, but not the same magnification.

If you can swing it, and you are determined to stay with Cannon then get a Cannon 5D first version (these can be had for under 1700.00 for the body) so you have a full frame sensor (same size as a 35mm negative), but if you insist on getting a crop sensor know that the lenses you are used to will be very similar to your film days as what changes is the field of view.

My 24mm lens on my Pentax K1 (full frame) produces wonderful images that have a wide field of view, on my Pentax K3 (and APS-C sensor) it produces wonderful images in the field of view equivalent to a 35mm lens.

People use super telephoto lenses with crop sensor camera bodies just for that narrow field of view so a photo taken with my K3 and my Sigma 50-500mm lens needs less cropping to get the birds to fill the frame as the same lens on my full frame body takes.

However, both camera bodies with this lens produce excellent images, and with the full frame body I can crop down to make a hummingbird fill the frame without losing detail, and can print that photo much larger than 16 x 24 inches and get a fantastic print.

The image below will explain what I am speaking of regarding field of view.
 

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