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Learner guitars - help

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
Gotta be some guitar folks here. I’m wanting to learn how to play. Probably will be acoustic at first since that’s typically what folks start on.

I’m looking for great learner guitars. I’ve done some research online and Fender and Yamaha are recommenced most. I’ll say I’m not looking for a cheap $40 guitar. I want a nice one that I can learn on and keep for years and continue to play. I figure it will cost $200 or so and that’s fine.

So what would you recommend?

Thanks!
 
i would recommend a yamaha.. they are best value for money and are a very well built guitar.. i have one myself, sound is incredible as is playability

dont worry about the trans-acoustic series.. they more of a gimmick

if you want to learn finger style go for a smaller body guitar

here's all the info you need on yamaha acoustic guitars
 
also just a heads up on the acoustic v electric guitar. Not sure why people start on an acoustic as it is actually easier to play on an electric guitar unless you refer to nylon strings. Takes a little while for your fingers to adjust to steel strings, and a electric guitar is easier to play due to a lower action, less tension on the strings and thinner string gauge

small edit on post above, that info on yamaha is in AU $$, expect to pay around half of that in the US
 
I got an Ibanez PC12MHCE to learn on, and have been very happy with it. I still can't play, but have had fun trying :D

I also got a Gretsch Jet Baritone electric. Electrics are great if you want to practice without disturbing others - just don't plug it in. As Stratman says, they're easier on the fingers too. Just don't get a baritone, as there's no tuition materials for the full fretboard (although I just have to drop a capo on to get it up to guitar tuning).
 

Billski

Here I am, 1st again.
also just a heads up on the acoustic v electric guitar. Not sure why people start on an acoustic as it is actually easier to play on an electric guitar unless you refer to nylon strings. Takes a little while for your fingers to adjust to steel strings, and a electric guitar is easier to play due to a lower action, less tension on the strings and thinner string gauge

Thanks for the info , @StratMan
 

CJB3

Contributor
i would recommend a yamaha.. they are best value for money and are a very well built guitar.. i have one myself, sound is incredible as is playability

dont worry about the trans-acoustic series.. they more of a gimmick

if you want to learn finger style go for a smaller body guitar

here's all the info you need on yamaha acoustic guitars
+1. It’s hard to do better than a Yamaha for a starter guitar. Get one with a solid spruce top.
 
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CJB3

Contributor
Although I agree with @StratMan on an electric being easier on the fingers, for most people, I would recommend an acoustic to start. They’re more portable and better, IMO, if you want to learn to accompany yourself while you sing.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
I guess I don’t want to purchase an amp as well. thanks for the info so far!
 
Just avoid the really cheap acoustic guitars. It's difficult to make a decent guitar for such little money. They tend to be difficult to play, don't stay in tune, sound quality is meh. Just no fun to play. The Yamaha FG800 is a decent guitar with a solid spruce top that is in your general price range. If you were spending more, I might suggest something else, but it is good for the money.
 
Yeah... I wouldn't start on an acoustic. I'd start with an electric guitar, and I'd look for a good deal on a used Squier Classic Vibe Stratocaster or Telecaster. They're incredible guitars that you'll never outgrow, and you can find them used around $250.

They can be played unplugged for a while if you don't want an amp right away. If you do buy an amp right off the bat, I'd look for a used 80s/90s USA-made Peavey solid state amp. They're indestructible, and their "Transtube" technology does a pretty damn good job of vacuum tube emulation.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
Just avoid the really cheap acoustic guitars. It's difficult to make a decent guitar for such little money. They tend to be difficult to play, don't stay in tune, sound quality is meh. Just no fun to play. The Yamaha FG800 is a decent guitar with a solid spruce top that is in your general price range. If you were spending more, I might suggest something else, but it is good for the money.
What else might you recommend for a bit more money?
 
also just a heads up on the acoustic v electric guitar. Not sure why people start on an acoustic as it is actually easier to play on an electric guitar unless you refer to nylon strings. Takes a little while for your fingers to adjust to steel strings, and a electric guitar is easier to play due to a lower action, less tension on the strings and thinner string gauge

Thanks for the info , @StratMan
If a song sounds good on an acoustic guitar, it will sound good on an electric (the same cannot be said in reverse). If you learn on an acoustic guitar, electric will be even easier. Learning music theory is a good thing, too.
 

CJB3

Contributor
What else might you recommend for a bit more money?
IME, there is a big jump in price between a good Yamaha (which are really good guitars) and better guitars for which it really makes sense to spend the money. If I were going to spend more money, and I wouldn’t necessarily recommend so in this case, I would recommend looking at American made, solid wood guitars, probably used.

You can probably get a used Larrivee for a little north of $1K. There are some decent Chinese made solid wood guitars (e.g., Recording King) that can be had for less, but I would recommend starting with a ~$200 Yamaha for now. It might be all you ever really need. If you really love the guitar, you can upgrade to a Martin, Gibson, Larrivee, etc.
 

CJB3

Contributor
I started my kids out all on Seagull S6 because it is a little wider at the nut, but back then you could pick them up for around 300$ not sure what they go for now
I forgot about Seagull. They’ve got some good entry-level guitars too. To me, they are comparable to Yamaha.
 
What else might you recommend for a bit more money?
That depends on what kind of music you like to play. You may not want to spend a lot until you have had a chance to explore a bit. For instance, if you are interested in fingerstyle you might want a smaller body guitar with a wider neck.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
Not looking to spend 1000 up front. I’d go a hundred or so more if I got a lot better guitar, but it sounds like the Yamaha is gonna do just fine.
 
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