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Late Thuringian Escher stones

[FONT=&amp]I already touched this issue several times in my previous post on Thuringians. But since there is quite an interest on that stones now, I want to give some further informations on the history of stones of the late period of the Escher company.[/FONT]

[FONT=&amp]The company J.G. Escher & Son was mainly a trading company located in Sonneberg. The waterwhetstones they sold in the 19[SUP]th[/SUP] and beginning 20[SUP]th[/SUP] century -equipped with their well known label- were mined by small mining companies in the area of Steinach. [/FONT]

[FONT=&amp]Over a long time mining and trading of these whetstones were two completely different businesses in Thuringia. For several years in the 19[SUP]th[/SUP] century there was even a law, which prohibits the mining companies to trade the stones by themselves. It was only allowed for the miners to sell the stones to trading companies. That might explain why the Escher company is well known until today, but the miners of that stones who did most of the work and who had the knowledge, were to find and how to quarry the good stones, remain mostly unknown.[/FONT]

[FONT=&amp]This situation in the Thuringian area changed after the ending of WW1, when the mining companies began to trade their own stones. This had the former consequence that the trading companies like Escher did not get any more waterwhetstones from the miners– after they had been delivered the last hundred years. Or they had to pay even a much higher price. So at the beginning 20[SUP]th[/SUP] century the trading companies had to look for new sources.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]From the 1920ths on the Escher&Son company was owned by Rudolf Schwarz who married a great-great-grandchild of the company founder J.G. Escher.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]Since the JGES company didn’t had own whetstone quarries, Rudolf Schwarz did a lot of research in the Thuringina mountains to find new sources. He was consulted and accompanied by a well known german geologic expert of this time and they finally found two new whetstone quarries that deliver the material from 1925 till the end of the company in 1953. The stones that came from these quarries were blue and mottled black in color.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]Of course at the beginning the Escher & son company also further sold some green stones from the old miners in Steinach, but more less in number and for a higher price. So the blue and black stones prevail more and more over the well known green hones. [/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]The late stones did not get much publicity in the States, because with beginning of the nazi regime in 1933 the export and trading with the States touched down.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]
$IMG_0239.jpg $IMG_0235.jpg
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[FONT=&amp]Whereas the late blue JGES that were mined until approximately 1937 are somehow comparable to the blue Thuringians of the early period from Steinach - both are Devonian age stones and the honing capability is comparable. The late blue ones seem to be a little bit finer and more dark blue in color (the typical early blue or dark blue labeled Escher stones all got a certain green hue, the late blue ones are going more into black) - are the mottled stones more comparable to hones know as “Schwedentein”. The hones are a bit harder and have the typical mottling that also most of the Schwedenstein hones do have (Schwedenstein hones do have a green color though). Also both types are most comparable in honing capabilities.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]
$IMG_8359.jpg $IMG_7484.jpg $IMG_8363.jpg
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SliceOfLife

Contributor
Nice info. Thanks. I've always wondered about the black eschers that aren't found on any price sheets we've seen. If they were the same mine or not.
 
Thanks Peter for the Information in Detail on History and on the Stones....

There was also and Trading Company Stone sold as "the Black Rock" i think its an Thuringian Stone and i am quite shure you might already have seen it....
 

SliceOfLife

Contributor
Stuff like this makes me want to learn German so I can find this info myself... but I'm already trying to learn Japanese so I can understand Jnats a bit better. Next I'll have to learn Dutch and French so I can learn more about coticules. God help me if I wanted to research Cnats or the Zulu grey. I don't even know where to start with those.
 
Stuff like this makes me want to learn German so I can find this info myself... but I'm already trying to learn Japanese so I can understand Jnats a bit better. Next I'll have to learn Dutch and French so I can learn more about coticules. God help me if I wanted to research Cnats or the Zulu grey. I don't even know where to start with those.
I know a fair amount of German and it's still hard for me to get through german posts.... Not common vocabulary learned in German language class
 

SliceOfLife

Contributor
True. Japanese seems a bit easier in that regard because of the structure of the language. Most of the terms involving stones seem to at least contain a few of the key Kanji (cut, blade, polish, etc), so with a bit of reasoning, you can piece together their meaning. With an alphabet like ours, I can see it being much more of a challenge to translate words you're unfamiliar with.
 
Peter, as always thanks for sharing your knowledge. The bout you sold me is still my favorite among finishers however I a recent Blue/YG combo that I fell into is slowing making headway. Hopefully one day I can pick up one these labeled Eschers for a price that isn't insane.
 
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