What's new

Lack of progress after 6 months SR shaving

So look to the simple things first and assume there's a combination of them afoot.

For six months, it sounds like you have made a lot of progress and are pointed in the right direction. I suspect that @Gamma is right about it being a combination of things.

Considering that you have a handful of razors, I would be hesitant to go down the reset bevel path unless there is a noticeable difference between how your different razors are performing. If and when you are ready to go down the reset bevel path, use a sub 50 USD used razor or Gold Dollar to learn. Don't make your first mistakes on a valuable Le Grelot!

Not sure how you shave, but (speaking of ideas) you might want to explore the use of two hands and develop a good backhand stroke. Watch this legendary video. At 3:10, Chimensch uses a backhand stroke to shave across the grain (I assume) and then at 3:30 a forehand stroke to shave with the grain.


I usually do the opposite. For my left* cheek, I first use a forehand stroke with my left hand to shave downward with the grain and then a backhand stroke with my right hand to shave toward my mouth across the grain. The idea came from this video. Just pay attention and go slowly the first few times.

The backhand stroke is also good for shaving around your nose - again, just go slowly.

*From my, not the mirror's, perspective.
 
After a week break from SRs, got stuck back in. Tried dropping the spine closer than usual. To barely half a spine distance. Result a huge jump in cutting efficiency.

Sometimes it's good to take a break.

One of what I think of as the sages of B&B says something along the lines of 'anything steeper than this is scraping, not shaving' and I would agree. Us beginners tend to scrape away for some time before learning to trust that the blade won't deglove our faces / scalps. Ironically it's a lot safer. That said, I find a couple of areas benefit from a steeper angle: for me this is the top of the head where there's little subcutaneous fat and the fine hairs there are very stubborn.

I would still recommend occasional use of a Feather shavette, or a similar model that uses AC blades. Possibly with the exception of an AC SS, as technique is slightly different for this type. It will teach you a lot about angle, correct pressure etc. while eliminating the variables of a hand-honed, self-stropped edge.
 
A total eureka moment! I was so not wowed by a SR that I used yesterday. I used bottled drinking water to make up the lather, it was far far slicker and much better.
Used the same razor, not even stropped - Best SR shave I've had yet!
I know the local tap water is salty and hard but this made a huge difference. I only needed less than a cupful in a bowl for the brush and lathering bit.
Never stop learning eh?
 
A total eureka moment! I was so not wowed by a SR that I used yesterday. I used bottled drinking water to make up the lather, it was far far slicker and much better.
Used the same razor, not even stropped - Best SR shave I've had yet!
I know the local tap water is salty and hard but this made a huge difference. I only needed less than a cupful in a bowl for the brush and lathering bit.
Never stop learning eh?
I found that little trick out a few years ago. At first I thought using bottled or filtered water would be a PITA. Nope, I just take my mug into the kitchen and fill it with hot water from the dispenser, and voila, great lather!

doug
 
For six months, it sounds like you have made a lot of progress and are pointed in the right direction. I suspect that @Gamma is right about it being a combination of things.

Considering that you have a handful of razors, I would be hesitant to go down the reset bevel path unless there is a noticeable difference between how your different razors are performing. If and when you are ready to go down the reset bevel path, use a sub 50 USD used razor or Gold Dollar to learn. Don't make your first mistakes on a valuable Le Grelot!

Not sure how you shave, but (speaking of ideas) you might want to explore the use of two hands and develop a good backhand stroke. Watch this legendary video. At 3:10, Chimensch uses a backhand stroke to shave across the grain (I assume) and then at 3:30 a forehand stroke to shave with the grain.


I usually do the opposite. For my left* cheek, I first use a forehand stroke with my left hand to shave downward with the grain and then a backhand stroke with my right hand to shave toward my mouth across the grain. The idea came from this video. Just pay attention and go slowly the first few times.

The backhand stroke is also good for shaving around your nose - again, just go slowly.

*From my, not the mirror's, perspective.

This video from and by Chimensch is as relaxing and compelling to watch today as it was years ago when I first watched it. I don't use his single hand method, but the Man is a master in my opinion. He was instrumental in teaching me how to shave with a SR. I follow his regimen to this day to include the use of the Alum block on my finger tips for additional support hand grip on the skin stretching as well as more tactile grip on the razor itself.
 
Top Bottom