What's new

Jonathan Crookes Wedge With 2 different grinds

Hello, I recently purchased a Jonathan Crookes Heart & Pistol straight wedge razor. It is a bit unusual in that it has two different grinds. On one face of the razor it has a very shallow hollow grind and on the other side it has a flat grind. Take a look at the attached photo's and you can see the difference in the shoulder of the razor from side to side. I have also included a picture of the end of the razor. The hollow grind on the one side is hard to see, but it is there. The razor also has horn scales. Overall I think the razor is in great shape.

The question I have for the group is - Why would they put a flat grind on one side and a very slight hollow on the other? Why not put a hollow on both sides?

If anyone has any history on this razor as well it would be appreciated. I did hone it up and it shavesnicely.

Thank, Jim


20211017_224745 (2).jpg
Jim20211017_224759 (2).jpg20211017_223845 (1).jpg
 
I forgot to mention that the box it came in says that it's corporate trade mark was granted in 1780. It would be nice if this razor was pre 1800's. There is probably no way to ever know.
 
Thank you, That makes sense. That's probably why it is in such good condition and hardly used. I honed and stropped it, then shaved a 4 day growth off. I always shave everyday so that when it pulled a little I thought it was just the length of the beard. Although the second pass was fine.

I haven't seen any wedge razors from the 1800's, but beside the flat side, is the geometry quiet different? or should I say, are wedge shaving razors more pointed?
 
Thank you, That makes sense. That's probably why it is in such good condition and hardly used. I honed and stropped it, then shaved a 4 day growth off. I always shave everyday so that when it pulled a little I thought it was just the length of the beard. Although the second pass was fine.

I haven't seen any wedge razors from the 1800's, but beside the flat side, is the geometry quiet different? or should I say, are wedge shaving razors more pointed?
Probably similar at the bevel. I’m guessing to get the sharpest edge on a microtome you would need to hone it asymmetrically, more like a kamisori or chisel.
 
Hello, I recently purchased a Jonathan Crookes Heart & Pistol straight wedge razor. It is a bit unusual in that it has two different grinds. On one face of the razor it has a very shallow hollow grind and on the other side it has a flat grind. Take a look at the attached photo's and you can see the difference in the shoulder of the razor from side to side. I have also included a picture of the end of the razor. The hollow grind on the one side is hard to see, but it is there. The razor also has horn scales. Overall I think the razor is in great shape.

The question I have for the group is - Why would they put a flat grind on one side and a very slight hollow on the other? Why not put a hollow on both sides?

If anyone has any history on this razor as well it would be appreciated. I did hone it up and it shavesnicely.

Thank, Jim


View attachment 1347644
JimView attachment 1347645View attachment 1347646
What you have here is in fact a shaving razor. It is not a microtome or any other such thing. What has happened is simply this: some uninformed person at some point in history ground the living bejeebers out of the one side, for some unknown reason. They ground the shoulder off, basically giving you a half wedge, half near wedge. It obviously shaves fine, and is a nice early razor, so I think it's a keeper! It probably dates to the 1850s-1870s.
 
What you have here is in fact a shaving razor. It is not a microtome or any other such thing. What has happened is simply this: some uninformed person at some point in history ground the living bejeebers out of the one side, for some unknown reason. They ground the shoulder off, basically giving you a half wedge, half near wedge. It obviously shaves fine, and is a nice early razor, so I think it's a keeper! It probably dates to the 1850s-1870s.
After your email I again looked closely at the razor, the side without the shoulder has not really been ground by someone trying to sharpen it. It is the flat side and has more "meat" to the steel than the hollow side. Therefore I don't think it was over ground. The razor has hardly had any use or sharpening. I did look up microtome's on the web and I have seen a number of examples of them where the grind is very much the same as mine. Shoulderless on one side and shouldered on the hollow side. Dating these old razors seems to be tough. The seller thought it could date back as old as 1780 but I doubt that. Thanks for the input.
 
If you hone a microtome like a kamisori it will shave very well. The only difference between it and a straight razor is the grind.
 
After your email I again looked closely at the razor, the side without the shoulder has not really been ground by someone trying to sharpen it. It is the flat side and has more "meat" to the steel than the hollow side. Therefore I don't think it was over ground. The razor has hardly had any use or sharpening. I did look up microtome's on the web and I have seen a number of examples of them where the grind is very much the same as mine. Shoulderless on one side and shouldered on the hollow side. Dating these old razors seems to be tough. The seller thought it could date back as old as 1780 but I doubt that. Thanks for the input.
It is Victorian era.

The brand was granted in 1780, but they were around for a long time. Generally you don't see cutlery marked with England pre 1890ish. They just say Sheffield, or no place name at all.

 
Last edited:
Top Bottom