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Jnats, how to get the most out of them?

When buying a new stone. What goes through your mind when trying them and testing them? I hope that isn’t a hard general question that is impossible to answer. Thanks JPO
That will be dependent on the type of stone and the intended use.
I have my preference with respect to how the stone feels in use.
I like really hard stones with what I call good traction and good honing sensation. You need to figure out what you like.
I also use magnification to get an idea of how they cut the steel.
I also rely on the testing done by the vendor. He is the expert.
 
That will be dependent on the type of stone and the intended use.
I have my preference with respect to how the stone feels in use.
I like really hard stones with what I call good traction and good honing sensation. You need to figure out what you like.
I also use magnification to get an idea of how they cut the steel.
I also rely on the testing done by the vendor. He is the expert.
Thank you JPO!
 
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As stated, hone a lot and document, always keep an open mind. How I approach each stone, initial testing, base line progression is all the same. After that process I usually veer off to what’s working for that particular stone.

Don’t try to get too cute with your diamond or Tomo Nagura when testing. Use a good Tomo you have experience with to draw a consistent base line. It does help to have a few you know well, but stick to what you know. Leave the Mikawa Nagura testing for later.

I do suggest testing with multiple slurry densities. From milky through water, you won’t actually know what hurts or benefits an edge until you experience it. You will also find you don’t need to dilute your slurries with a Jnat once you find the correct density. Nothing can replace hands on experience.

Establish consistent checks and verifications in your routine, loop or scope, pictures and notes are great. Some type of sharpness tests (hht or equivalent) is great but don’t get ultra wrapped up in that. It’s a good way to check refinement but the shave test is the determining factor.

Nothing is fast about the process but it’s enjoyable and rewarding. I will say it again, keep notes and make sure your time is not wasted.

Remember, there is more than one way to skin a cat, but all of those options require a sharp edge.
 
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