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JNAT Problem - revoming glue from Hone

Good evening everybody,

I have a beatiful and powerful Ozooku Asagi which once was glued on to a wooden base.
Unfortunately now the wooden base is gone but the glue-marks stayed.

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Question: How can i dissolve/remove the lacquer and glue (brown spots) left on the bottom of the JNAT without the danger of damaging the stone?
Can anyone help me?

Thank you very much indeed
 
Do you know what kind of glue?

Shellac-denatured alcohol
Everything else-mineral spirits/acetone


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Almost anything will work. I regularly soak them in isopropyl alcohol to remove the stinky honing solution from used hones, and I’ve used regular methylene chloride paint stripper on them with no problems. Alcohol will not remove or lighten the ink they use for the stamps. Paint stripper should do it, lacquer thinner would also probably work. Use only non-abrasive scrubbers like a pot scrubber To remove the goo. A wire brush works well but if you’re not careful it will take off enough stone to be noticeable.

Jnats are about 86% quartz, 6% iron, with a few other mid weight elements. just don’t use anything acidic.
 
Do you know what kind of glue?

Shellac-denatured alcohol
Everything else-mineral spirits/acetone


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Unfortunately I don't know what glue it is.
I will try with acetone.
Thanks for the help.
 
Almost anything will work. I regularly soak them in isopropyl alcohol to remove the stinky honing solution from used hones, and I’ve used regular methylene chloride paint stripper on them with no problems. Alcohol will not remove or lighten the ink they use for the stamps. Paint stripper should do it, lacquer thinner would also probably work. Use only non-abrasive scrubbers like a pot scrubber To remove the goo. A wire brush works well but if you’re not careful it will take off enough stone to be noticeable.

Jnats are about 86% quartz, 6% iron, with a few other mid weight elements. just don’t use anything acidic.
Thank you very much indeed.
 
I wouild block it on a bench and carefully use a chisel to remove it. I've actually done this, and it worked well. Warming the glue can work with you, or against you, depending on the glue. Using an ice cube to chill spots of glue can help, but cold can make the stone brittle, be careful. Never pound, always try to be very smooth and deliberate, always go as close to parallel with the stone's surface as possible, never directly 'into' the stone. Best to use 400 light taps than 1 good whack.
Use sandpaper to remove chisel marks.
I might entertain using a solvent but I would be very conservative about doing so, I would not want to have a solvent take off glue but then soak it into the stone.
 
I wouild block it on a bench and carefully use a chisel to remove it. I've actually done this, and it worked well. Warming the glue can work with you, or against you, depending on the glue. Using an ice cube to chill spots of glue can help, but cold can make the stone brittle, be careful. Never pound, always try to be very smooth and deliberate, always go as close to parallel with the stone's surface as possible, never directly 'into' the stone. Best to use 400 light taps than 1 good whack.
Use sandpaper to remove chisel marks.
I might entertain using a solvent but I would be very conservative about doing so, I would not want to have a solvent take off glue but then soak it into the stone.
This sounds scary, but I might give it a go. Thank you very much for the advice.
 
I’ve got one that I have to do, but ai can’t get to it until later today or tomorrow - it’s supposed to rain until sunday. But if you want I’ll do mine first and tell you how it went.

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First image, 1 coat of methylene chloride paint stripper applied with a foam brush. Be sure to follow all product precautions, it can burn you, pretty quickly sometimes, and always use eye protection with this stuff. Properly used, it’s as safe as many household products like drain cleaner, bowl cleaner, etc.

Second image, glue b gone, I removed the stripper with 000 steel wool and washed it in soap and water. There’s some residual glue on the edges of the sides, but that will be short work.

So this works. I knew it would because I’ve done it before but not taken any pictures. No one would be interested until now, lol.

Paint stripper is methylene chloride in paraffin or something similar, do I’ll give it a soak in isopropyl alcohol in a zip lock baggie overnight to remove any residue. Zip Lock bags will hold alcohol, but make sure that it isn’t leaking and keep it away from ignition sources since alcohol is flammable. Next day you can pour it out outside or just put it down the drain with a good water flush.

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Jnat in Zip Lock with alcohol. I really don’t need to do this, but it will remove all traces of the paraffin. If later I want to la lacquer the sides/back, the paraffin could be a problem and I’d never remember if I ‘degreased’ the stone or not.

The bag is sitting on an absorbent bar towel inside a tray that can contain all the alcohol if it did leak.

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This sounds scary, but I might give it a go. Thank you very much for the advice.
A lot depends on the glue, and it's age. It seems scarier than it really is. Not only do I do this on stones, I do it on wood boxes and Dai also. Go slow and be gentle. Baby taps. Less is more. If the glue says 'no' - don't push it. I avoid using solvents because it will usually dissolve some of the glue and then run into the stone and when the solvent evaoporates it would leave the glue residue in the stone. Might not matter, or it could matter a lot. I haven't cared to try and find out. I will also say that the glue doesn't really look too bad and leaving it alone might be the best course of action. Or non-action. Less is, often, more.
 
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I’ve never seen glue residue left on or penetrated into a stone. YMMV. The only substance that I’ve seen that penetrates a jnat is that nasty yellow honing solution that they frequently use. I get most of that out with alcohol soaks.
 
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