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Japanese razors in real life

Yesterday I visited a well-known Japanese shopping center in Edgewater, NJ. (There are large Korean or Korean-American populations in nearby Englewood and Leonia, and I imagine some Japanese-Americans too.) Nowhere near as large or impressive as one I once visited in suburban Toronto, but still nice enough. It includes a supermarket with cosmetics and toiletries, but alas, the men's shaving section only had cheap plastic disposables and multi-blade cartridges, a couple made by Feather, but mostly from a brand called Gatsby. The housewares aisle had knives made by Kai, but no Kai razor blades.
It looks like the average guy in Japan is no more a shaving enthusiast than the average guy in the US of A.
 
In talking with a member from Japan, about 80-90% use electrics. Some collect Kamisori, but few use them. About the only de generally available is the Feather Popular.
Kind of surprising, but understandable to.
 
In talking with a member from Japan, about 80-90% use electrics. Some collect Kamisori, but few use them. About the only de generally available is the Feather Popular.
Kind of surprising, but understandable to.

Much safer to use an electric when Godzilla is chasing you. :chinese:
 
Yesterday I visited a well-known Japanese shopping center in Edgewater, NJ. (There are large Korean or Korean-American populations in nearby Englewood and Leonia, and I imagine some Japanese-Americans too.) Nowhere near as large or impressive as one I once visited in suburban Toronto, but still nice enough. It includes a supermarket with cosmetics and toiletries, but alas, the men's shaving section only had cheap plastic disposables and multi-blade cartridges, a couple made by Feather, but mostly from a brand called Gatsby. The housewares aisle had knives made by Kai, but no Kai razor blades.
It looks like the average guy in Japan is no more a shaving enthusiast than the average guy in the US of A.

I would not put to much stock in this observation. The Japanese stores here in America compared to the stores in Japan would be like comparing Taco Bell to the homemade food you would get in Mexico.
 
I would not put to much stock in this observation. The Japanese stores here in America compared to the stores in Japan would be like comparing Taco Bell to the homemade food you would get in Mexico.
I see your point and don't disagree, but this isn't quite like Taco Bell. These were Japanese products and mainly Japanese (and probably Korean) customers. A minimum of signage in English, and in some places no English at all. Certainly many if not most products had no English on the labels, and many of them I'm told are ordinarily only available in Japan. That doesn't mean it was just like being in Tokyo, but if Japan is one of those places where multiblade cartridges have not completely taken over for DE blades, you certainly couldn't tell from the stores in that shopping center.
 
I know this market well, and it's as mozartman says, though you can get Lúcido aftershave for roughly twice what it costs in Japan (roughly $12).

I remember scouting out shave goods in Japan itself -- and you have to look pretty hard. Feather DE blades are around but not plentiful. Injector blades can be had. I didn't see much by way of razors except for carts (and I did not see the Feather Neo system). Soaps and creams are not really part of the scene. Aftershaves are the most plentiful (and for me, enjoyable) Japanese shave goods.
 
When I was in Okinawa I looked in both CVS type stores as well as grocery stores. Was able to find several aftershaves, but saw nothing but cartridges and no DE blades.

@mozartman, the Gatsby aftershave is great stuff!
Thanks, Mark, but judging from the experience of @Rory1262, they may charge a hefty premium for that in the US. I'll keep it in mind if and when I visit Japan.:001_smile
 
From what I understand, the shaving culture in Japan is much like it is in the USA. Its all about whats quicker and easier. There arent any real brushes or soaps, its all brushless creams. Lathering up with a brush is much more of a European thing.
 
Ive seen 2 de's for sale in the netherlands, one was an ok at best 3 piece, the other a rather expensive 2 piece (i think, i didnt want to open the box) . In germany ive seen 1, a modern plastic/metal inners gillette which can also be bought on amazon for €3,95. Its just a bit too specialist to be on the shelves of regular shops.
 
From what I understand, the shaving culture in Japan is much like it is in the USA. Its all about whats quicker and easier. There arent any real brushes or soaps, its all brushless creams. Lathering up with a brush is much more of a European thing.
No surprise. In other countries they often have profound respect for their own cultural traditions but are only interested in the latest superficial fads when it comes to the US of A. I remember when McDonald's was all the rage in Paris in the 70s. Their food was no better than American McDonald's, if anything worse, and imitators sprung up everywhere where the food was even worse yet. The superb cafes, patisseries, brasseries, etc. remained unaffected.
 
From what I understand, the shaving culture in Japan is much like it is in the USA. Its all about whats quicker and easier. There arent any real brushes or soaps, its all brushless creams. Lathering up with a brush is much more of a European thing.

I went to Japan an number of times, but never saw much shaving stuff in their stores. So this would fit my observations.
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
He's talking about the great shopping center named Mitsuwa. My daughter's summer internship is about five minutes away, so we're there about once a week. She is apparently addicted to beef udon.

It sells a variety of items, but it is primarily food based.
 
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