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Is replating more than cosmetic?

I just got a Gillette New with most of the plating worn off and am considering having it replated once razorplate.com starts accepting new work. Does replating improve the quality of your shave or is it just done for cosmetic reasons? Here's a couple pics of the razor.
$WP_20150708_11_56_02_Pro.jpg $WP_20150708_11_56_39_Pro.jpg
 
It doesn't affect the performance, but it's not merely cosmetic.

Most will probably say it's not an issue (for now), brass doesn't rust, etc, etc ... and that's all true.

But ... they were originally plated/gold washed for a reason. It protects the metal, simple as that. It won't be an issue now, but the pitting corrosion WILL eventually start degrading the razor. Just my opinion anyway.
 
It doesn't affect the performance, but it's not merely cosmetic.

Most will probably say it's not an issue (for now), brass doesn't rust, etc, etc ... and that's all true.

But ... they were originally plated/gold washed for a reason. It protects the metal, simple as that. It won't be an issue now, but the pitting corrosion WILL eventually start degrading the razor. Just my opinion anyway.
Edgar - Do you have any guesses as to how long it would take the pitting corrosion to eventually occur if the razor is kept dry and relatively clean? Are we talking about 5 years, 50 years, or 500 years? I know this is a difficult question to answer but I'm hoping that you or someone else has enough knowledge on the subject to at least make an educated guess. I am quite fond of my bare brass Gillettes and I'd like to be a good steward of these wonderful shavers while they're in my possession.
 
I didn't notice any difference in the shave quality when I had my New SC done. I think it does protect the base metal and it will definatly keep it around for another 50 or 75 years and then maybe someone will have it replated again. Nice to think like that anyway. :001_smile
 
Edgar - Do you have any guesses as to how long it would take the pitting corrosion to eventually occur if the razor is kept dry and relatively clean? Are we talking about 5 years, 50 years, or 500 years? I know this is a difficult question to answer but I'm hoping that you or someone else has enough knowledge on the subject to at least make an educated guess. I am quite fond of my bare brass Gillettes and I'd like to be a good steward of these wonderful shavers while they're in my possession.
I really don't know. As I said, just my opinion based on what I've read and seen. I suppose it won't take 500 years, otherwise we wouldn't see so many razors lightly (sometimes even severely) pitted. I suppose the process will take much longer if you do take care of the razor, but I still think it will eventually happen. Perhaps not in your lifetime, though ... :lol:

When you see a replate that is not perfectly smooth, probably it wasn't the replater's fault. If the pitting is severe there's really nothing they can do. That's why Onotoman (I'm sure you know who he is) once told me that if a razor needs to be replated, it's always better sooner than later. I asked him when I purchased my first Slim, the guards were brassed but the rest of the razor was quite nice. I believe Chris would say the same thing.

I also have bare brass razors, but those are the cheaper and easily replaceable ones. There's nothing wrong with having and shaving with bare brass razors. My point is that the plating is not merely cosmetic, serves a dual purpose - makes the razor look nicer, and protects the metal. It's also easier to clean, so I guess it serves a triple purpose. :lol:
 
Some like the worn look of the exposed brass. I happen to like the look of the razor, as it was intended to look. I have a couple of razors that have two tones of brass, and no original finish. I plan to lacquer them, for protection, an to keep the finish from getting too dull.
But, to each his/her own.
 
Also my opinion, based on what I've read and seen; I think the environment plays a role. Chlorinated water is probably one of the biggest factors.

I have well water, so no chlorination, live in a relatively cool and dry climate, pretty clean air, and no where near salt water; and I can't think of any problems I've had with any type of metal pitting, particularly not brass. So I expect my razors to last indefinitely, or at least way longer than me.

But then, I guess it could be luck too.
 
I really don't know. As I said, just my opinion based on what I've read and seen. I suppose it won't take 500 years, otherwise we wouldn't see so many razors lightly (sometimes even severely) pitted. I suppose the process will take much longer if you do take care of the razor, but I still think it will eventually happen. Perhaps not in your lifetime, though ... :lol:

When you see a replate that is not perfectly smooth, probably it wasn't the replater's fault. If the pitting is severe there's really nothing they can do. That's why Onotoman (I'm sure you know who he is) once told me that if a razor needs to be replated, it's always better sooner than later. I asked him when I purchased my first Slim, the guards were brassed but the rest of the razor was quite nice. I believe Chris would say the same thing.

I also have bare brass razors, but those are the cheaper and easily replaceable ones. There's nothing wrong with having and shaving with bare brass razors. My point is that the plating is not merely cosmetic, serves a dual purpose - makes the razor look nicer, and protects the metal. It's also easier to clean, so I guess it serves a triple purpose. :lol:
+1

Well stated, Edgar!
 
If the metal is not pitting or breaking down in any way then it shouldn't affect the shave quality, having said that, I personally like all my razors to be in the best possible condition at all times, but I tend to be a little over kill about it. If I have a favorite razor that I plan to keep for a long time and the original finish is coming off then I will replate, I do have some razors that are brass or polished brass in my case and they will likely stay that way, they will require more maintenance but it is worth it IMO.
 
I really don't know. As I said, just my opinion based on what I've read and seen. I suppose it won't take 500 years, otherwise we wouldn't see so many razors lightly (sometimes even severely) pitted. I suppose the process will take much longer if you do take care of the razor, but I still think it will eventually happen. Perhaps not in your lifetime, though ... :lol:

When you see a replate that is not perfectly smooth, probably it wasn't the replater's fault. If the pitting is severe there's really nothing they can do. That's why Onotoman (I'm sure you know who he is) once told me that if a razor needs to be replated, it's always better sooner than later. I asked him when I purchased my first Slim, the guards were brassed but the rest of the razor was quite nice. I believe Chris would say the same thing.

I also have bare brass razors, but those are the cheaper and easily replaceable ones. There's nothing wrong with having and shaving with bare brass razors. My point is that the plating is not merely cosmetic, serves a dual purpose - makes the razor look nicer, and protects the metal. It's also easier to clean, so I guess it serves a triple purpose. :lol:
That was my guess as well. Plating does protect the bare metal, so if you want your razor to last you another 500 years instead of only 100, then you should probably replate. Oh, and it also makes them nice and shiny. Who doesn't love shiny stuff?
 
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