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Is polka really dead?

I'm not even sure there are still bowling alleys let alone polka ..
There are still bowling alleys but you can’t smoke in them anymore and if you decide to have a “discussion” about whether someone’s foot was over the line you are asked to leave. And the ones around here don’t sell pitchers of beer anymore. Who wants to bowl if you can’t smoke and drink cheap pitchers of icehouse beer?
 

garyg

B&B membership has its percs
There are still bowling alleys but you can’t smoke in them anymore and if you decide to have a “discussion” about whether someone’s foot was over the line you are asked to leave. And the ones around here don’t sell pitchers of beer anymore. Who wants to bowl if you can’t smoke and drink cheap pitchers of icehouse beer?


Right - Guess having to quit fighting & drinking & smoking there's no reason to look too far afield for one .. probably due to me north coast heritage I confused polkas & bowling
 
Is Polka dead? I certainly hope so! (Just kidding). My grandfather immigranted from Switzerland, and he loved it. He claimed it was the world's happiest music, and you could tell because those dancing to it are always smiling. 😊
 
Hahaha….Good point Gary. Perhaps it has gone down the same trail as “put-put”, Drive-in movies, and the slinky.

My wife and I miss drive-in movies. While dating in college in the late 1960s, we spent many a (cheap) date in the back seat of my '66 LeMans at the drive-in. Even after we married and the kids were born, we took them to drive-ins. We'd get a bucket of KFC and everyone was happy. Good times for all.
 
My wife and I miss drive-in movies. While dating in college in the late 1960s, we spent many a (cheap) date in the back seat of my '66 LeMans at the drive-in. Even after we married and the kids were born, we took them to drive-ins. We'd get a bucket of KFC and everyone was happy. Good times for all.
You buried the lead in this comment.

You have pictures of the ‘66 LeMans?
 
You have pictures of the ‘66 LeMans?

Weirdly enough I don't think I do. We didn't think about those things back then. It cost me about $2,700 special order from a dealer, and I worked my butt off several summers in a factory to pay for it. I do remember the color was candlelight cream with a black vinyl top. It was a 326 with a 4 speed and I beat it like a rented mule. By the time I sold it in 1971, for $500, it was a beat-up bucket of bolts. Cars back then didn't last long and rusted out quick on the east coast.
 
My wife and I miss drive-in movies. While dating in college in the late 1960s, we spent many a (cheap) date in the back seat of my '66 LeMans at the drive-in. Even after we married and the kids were born, we took them to drive-ins. We'd get a bucket of KFC and everyone was happy. Good times for all.
Oh yes…The good old days!
 
Even after we married and the kids were born, we took them to drive-ins. We'd get a bucket of KFC and everyone was happy. Good times for all.
The Atlantic provinces are a bit more on the 'have-not' side of Canada. While I'm sure there were any number of cheap date nights, a large number of vehicles were families. Cheap entertainment, kids see movies that parents could never afford to take the whole family to. For people without air-conditioning, it was a godsend just to get out of the house. Bring your own snacks/drinks to save money, can take the youngest ones and just let them sleep while the rest are watching so no babysitter cost.... It was the Netflix equivalent of today. I'm not sure how many remained throughout Nova Scotia, but I know the one near where I lived made it until the mid-80s before shutting down. I don't remember half of what I saw, but I know that I saw Star Wars when it hit the drive in, not the theater. And as a young teen, Gone with the Wind was much more melodramatic up on the big screen. Because of how double and triple bills were done, I saw god's quantity of westerns and war movies that were not the main attraction.
 
I worked TV news in Scranton in the late 70s. After the 11pm news on Friday we used to stick around for the horror movie hosted by a magician where we would play along in some of his skits. After his show was over along came "Polka Varieties". It was always a weird culture shock for me. Scranton and Wilkes Barre had big Polish populations. Of course since I married a Polish gal I soon became well educated in the non-polka aspects of Polish culture.
 
I'm glad I found this thread. Now hopefully somebody makes one about yodeling. If you like polka watch this small clip. I will warn you if you watch it you will track down every single Rory hoffman clip and realize he is a stunning musician. He plays dozens of instruments and is blind.

 
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Growing up in the Indianhead part of Northern Wisconsin/Arrowhead part of Minnesota in the 60s-70s no weekend was complete without Lawrence Welk in the evening and the "The Chmielewski Funtime Show" in the afternoon featuring the Chmielewski Brothers (Florian and Jerry and their extended family). Polka music played on the jukebox at the local Tavern on a Friday or Saturday night always ended with eligible (and uneligible) dancers pairing up for the song or the evening and pushing the pool players to the edges of an impromptu dance floor. That, and every wedding reception with a band has to have one or two polka songs in their bag of tricks--even to this day. But I agree, polka music is unfortunately becoming more of a punchline than a genre.
 
Man, what memories! I spent years driving across South Dakota listening to WNAX 570. Every Sunday afternoon they had a one-hour polka program and I was always on the road for it. I would crank that thing up till the speakers rattled when the polka was on.

Absolute favourite polka rendition: Lenny Homolka and the Chicago Push doing Cyrcle's "Red Rubber Ball."

It's on YouTube.

That would have been up to about 2004. I had an old Chevy S10 Blazer that had a dead radio when I bought it. Stopped the tow driver from the junkyard who was hauling off the old Ford that died, took the AM-only radio out of the old Ford and put it in the Chevy. Between WNAX in Yankton and KOTA in Rapid City (where I worked at the time) I had my news, info, "Visit with the Neighbour Lady," and polka all covered.

Which reminds me that Ford used to make a pretty darn good AM-only radio.

O.H.
 

garyg

B&B membership has its percs
Polka isn't dead after all! O.H.'s observation reminds me that the first new car I ever had was a Ford Pinto on which the AM radio was the only option, aside from the dealer-installed orange & white pinstriping that made it a Cleve-town Browns Special Edition ..
 
Weirdly enough I don't think I do. We didn't think about those things back then. It cost me about $2,700 special order from a dealer, and I worked my butt off several summers in a factory to pay for it. I do remember the color was candlelight cream with a black vinyl top. It was a 326 with a 4 speed and I beat it like a rented mule. By the time I sold it in 1971, for $500, it was a beat-up bucket of bolts. Cars back then didn't last long and rusted out quick on the east coast.
Now I got why 'Grandpa' keep saying, "Cars nowadays are useless at our times our cars were horses". He meant to say mules:thumbup:
 
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