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Intermittent Fasting...can anyone explain it?

Bhugo

Contributor
Sorry, I felt the need to comment. This is absolutely untrue. If it were true, the last statement would be irrelevant.

In the end, total calories are what matter. Yes, it's not as easy to gain body fat on a lower carb diet, but that doesn't mean that you can't overeat.
I believe we agree...... I don’t understand what you think is untrue?
 
I think "dieting" is like razors. There are so many because what works for 1 does not work for another. It is not as simple as basic math...… but sort of. The very basics of it comes down to calories in vs calories out (burnt). There are multiple details and we could go into macro and micro nutrients, body types, nutrient timing.... and just confuse the heck out of most. Burn more calories than you eat and you will lose weight. Eat more than you burn and you will gain. Keep trying "fad" diets or just trying. Find what works for you. If you want it to last it has to be a lifestyle change. Not a 30 day diet and go back to your normal habits. Sustainable changes with consistency over time = success. YMMV as they say. Keep looking until you find what works for you. Just never give up!
 
Keep it flexible, run experiments and see what works for you. Just go slow and have a plan.

I lost 35 lbs and I've kept it off for about a year so far. I also dropped my blood pressure medication and went from Omeprazole to Prevacid for managing my hiatal hernia.

I mostly skip breakfast, eat lunch a bit later, eat only dinner 3 days per week, and I stay pretty flexible on weekends. I throw in a 40 hour fast every month or two.

Notice I said mostly. Sometimes, though rarely, I eat breakfast. I often eat a snack about an hour after dinner, and sometimes have a small snack for lunch during my OMAD days.

I also took about 4 months to build up to that schedule, I didn't just jump all the way in. For me, it has to be a little bit flexible, and it's been working for me for almost 2 years now.
 
Keep it flexible, run experiments and see what works for you. Just go slow and have a plan.

I lost 35 lbs and I've kept it off for about a year so far. I also dropped my blood pressure medication and went from Omeprazole to Prevacid for managing my hiatal hernia.

I mostly skip breakfast, eat lunch a bit later, eat only dinner 3 days per week, and I stay pretty flexible on weekends. I throw in a 40 hour fast every month or two.

Notice I said mostly. Sometimes, though rarely, I eat breakfast. I often eat a snack about an hour after dinner, and sometimes have a small snack for lunch during my OMAD days.

I also took about 4 months to build up to that schedule, I didn't just jump all the way in. For me, it has to be a little bit flexible, and it's been working for me for almost 2 years now.
+1 on go slow. It seems counter productive, but "they say" losing weight quickly, you are more likely to put it back. Losing at a slower rate you are more likely to keep it off and also retain more muscle in the process. My knowledge comes from a hobby of body building/weight training but I believe it is mostly parallel to general weight manipulation.
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
I am currently doing the 5/2 IF diet. 5 days a week, I eat normally. 2 days per week (Mon and Thur) I eat ~600 calories per day. I will lose 1-3 pounds per week doing this. Once I get to my ideal weight, I will cut back to 6/1 to maintain.

This has worked for me for the most part.
This will depend a lot on what "eat normally" means for you.
 
I believe we agree...... I don’t understand what you think is untrue?
I am very sorry, I took your words a different way, in the sense that "it's impossible to overeat during your window, you can eat anything!" I see that myth spouted all the time, got defensive, and read it the wrong way.
 

Bhugo

Contributor
I am very sorry, I took your words a different way, in the sense that "it's impossible to overeat during your window, you can eat anything!" I see that myth spouted all the time, got defensive, and read it the wrong way.
Understandable! There is a lot of disinformation about dieting out there. Best Wishes
 
I think "dieting" is like razors. There are so many because what works for 1 does not work for another. It is not as simple as basic math...… but sort of. The very basics of it comes down to calories in vs calories out (burnt). There are multiple details and we could go into macro and micro nutrients, body types, nutrient timing.... and just confuse the heck out of most. Burn more calories than you eat and you will lose weight. Eat more than you burn and you will gain. Keep trying "fad" diets or just trying. Find what works for you. If you want it to last it has to be a lifestyle change. Not a 30 day diet and go back to your normal habits. Sustainable changes with consistency over time = success. YMMV as they say. Keep looking until you find what works for you. Just never give up!
If ya eat three elephants and only work off two elephants, there's still an elephant in there somewhere. Simple math. :w00t: :w00t: :w00t:
 
I make sure I get a rowing session (on our Concept2 Model D) on the machine before I break a fast.

fasting and exercise, from Dr. Rhonda Patrick's ig:

A new study has shown that exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves insulin sensitivity, and increases glucose uptake into muscle tissue compared to exercising after eating breakfast. This new study is in-line with a meta-analysis of 46 clinical studies that found exercising while fasted induces adaptations to mitochondria in muscle and adipose tissue, including increased fatty acid metabolism that is blunted by pre-exercise feeding.

Exercising in a fasted state increased the release of fatty acids stored in adipose tissue and boosted their use for energy. Exercising while fasted also caused mitochondria in adipose tissue to increase gene activity in genes related to fatty acid metabolism, making them more efficient at burning fat for energy in the long-term even when you are not exercising. These adaptations were blunted by pre-exercise feeding, which means people that ate before working out did not have these benefits.

This meta-analysis also showed diverse effects on exercise performance, as well. Pre-exercise feeding did enhance performance in long-duration aerobic exercise (> 60 minutes) but had no effect on aerobic training shorter than 60 minutes. Pre-exercise feeding also slightly enhanced anaerobic exercise (i.e. run until exhaustion) but had no effect on high-intensity interval training.
 
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