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Used to be, getting a tat was a sign of independence, rebellion and free-thinking. Judging by those I see sporting ink these days, I'm inclined to think that I, by NOT having any ink, am in fact, the rebel. It doesn't say much more about someone than getting their ears pierced. It's pretty much normal.


Discuss.
 
Used to be, getting a tat was a sign of independence, rebellion and free-thinking. Judging by those I see sporting ink these days, I'm inclined to think that I, by NOT having any ink, am in fact, the rebel. It doesn't say much more about someone than getting their ears pierced. It's pretty much normal.


Discuss.

Yes. I knew that if I bided my time they'd move the edge far enough that I'd be standing on it without having to actually do anything. Kind of a passive aggressive rebellion. :punk:
 
I'd say until the time when you don't need to cover it up to go to a mainstream corporate type job interview they're still kind of marginal, but they are defiantly edging their way from the tributaries into the mainstream.

Many these days are gotten because "it's the thing to do" or other social reasons, makes me think that there will be very, very good money in tattoo removal in 10 years.

I've got two, I thought long and hard about it and carried around the pictures for months before I got them done in the flesh.
 
I'd say until the time when you don't need to cover it up to go to a mainstream corporate type job interview they're still kind of marginal, but they are defiantly edging their way from the tributaries into the mainstream.

Many these days are gotten because "it's the thing to do" or other social reasons, makes me think that there will be very, very good money in tattoo removal in 10 years.

I've got two, I thought long and hard about it and carried around the pictures for months before I got them done in the flesh.


that and in piercing removal/hole closure.
 
The only tat I've ever actually kind of wanted is the Black Flag "bars"

And that was before Howard Stern wanted them.

It's still kind of cryptic, and it means something to me and to those that recognize it.

maybe someday still..
 
makes me think that there will be very, very good money in tattoo removal in 10 years.

http://gprime.net/video.php/tattooremover

I think tattoos are more mainstream, but you can tell who just decided to get one or two for the hell of it ("Oh, a chinese symbol? How worldly of you") versus those who ink their bodies for a deeper purpose.

I'm just glad I passed on the bandwagon in college where all my male friends got their tongues pierced....
 
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I've always wanted a tattoo (mostly as a rebellious statement), but when everyone else started getting them I got pretty discouraged. I was really interested in tribal patterns, but they unfortunately became extremely popular and so I chose to not get one.

However, if I came across a design that was extremely unique, or even better - one of my own design (something that had strong personal meaning) , I think I'd still get one.
 
This reminds me of a funny "new rule" from Bill Maher's show:

"New Rule: Just because your tattoo has Chinese characters in it doesn't make you spiritual. It's right above the crack of your ***. And it translates to 'beef with broccoli.' The last time you did anything spiritual, you were praying to God you weren't pregnant. You're not spiritual. You're just high."
 
This reminds me of a funny "new rule" from Bill Maher's show:

"New Rule: Just because your tattoo has Chinese characters in it doesn't make you spiritual. It's right above the crack of your ***. And it translates to 'beef with broccoli.' The last time you did anything spiritual, you were praying to God you weren't pregnant. You're not spiritual. You're just high."

:lol::lol::lol:


actually, I do remember reading somewhere that many (most?) of the chinese characters found in tat books (and hence on people) are just plain wrong as compared to what they are supposed to mean.
 
:lol::lol::lol:


actually, I do remember reading somewhere that many (most?) of the chinese characters found in tat books (and hence on people) are just plain wrong as compared to what they are supposed to mean.

In the last few years they seem to have gotten better but in the past the calligraphic aesthetics of many Chinese tattoos I've seen was horrible. I always felt it was such a waste to go to the bother of having a Chinese character inked into your skin only to have it poorly executed.
 
A shipmate of mine got a tattoo at a Chinese shop in Hong Kong...he wanted "Born To Lose" on his arm. Next day when he took the bandage off, his new tattoo read "Born Too Loose". To me, that defines irony.
 
Ten years ago people said the same thing. I think more money is still being put into ink rather than ink removal.
 
A shipmate of mine got a tattoo at a Chinese shop in Hong Kong...he wanted "Born To Lose" on his arm. Next day when he took the bandage off, his new tattoo read "Born Too Loose". To me, that defines irony.

Thats funny!:lol:
I guess it could have been worse...
could have been Born to Roose...
:lol::lol::lol:
 
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