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Ink "permanence"

While I know inks like Noodler's Black are listed as "eternal" or however they word it... basically, archival inks. And that's fine, except the inks that are listed as archival are limited... so my question is, for "normal inks", how long will the ink last once on paper? I'm not talking ink that gets wet, etc. Basically, I have a 6 month old neice whom I am planning to write a series of letters to for her to open at specific points in her life... so these letters will be written NOW, but not opened for perhaps 5-, 10-, 20-years... Assuming they are kept in their envelopes, how long can I expect ink to still be readable at that point?

Also, with the exception of the few Noodler's inks that list as archival, are there any other brands that offer FP "permanent" inks? Thanks!
 
There are certainly handwritten documents that have lasted since the introduction of fountain pens, but the ink formulas of, say, 1920, may be more durable than modern ones. Or less so. That's not to say that I'm particularly worried about whether my journals will be legible in 50 years; I just don't know from experience, since my oldest journals are in ballpoint, and I've only been using fountain pens for a few years. One thing that could cause ink to fade, besides dampness, would be constant exposure to strong light, but that's not an issue with something that will be sealed in an envelope as soon as it's written.

But about other brands. Besides Noodler's, some "permanent" inks are made by Rohrer & Klinger, look for the iron gall inks such as Salix or Scabiosa. Most Diamine inks are not even waterproof, but they make a "Registrar's Ink" which is intended for archival purposes. You can get it in any color you like as long as it's blue-black.

There are other likely choices I know of, but I'll let others fill those in, especially those who have experience with them.
 
Don't put iron gall ink in a fountain pen unless you are absolutely sure it has been formulated specifically for fountain pens. It is acidic and can eat sacks and tines as well as clog up.
 
I'm not even thinking of trying a permanent ink until I can change the ink in a pen without coloring my fingers. I'm getting closer.
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
Don't put iron gall ink in a fountain pen unless you are absolutely sure it has been formulated specifically for fountain pens. It is acidic and can eat sacks and tines as well as clog up.

... Rohrer & Klinger, look for the iron gall inks such as Salix or Scabiosa. ... Diamine ... make a "Registrar's Ink" which is intended for archival purposes. You can get it in any color you like as long as it's blue-black.

Those I-G inks mentioned will be fine.
 

nemo

Cheaper than ink
I've experienced some fading with modern Parker Quink blue. After seven or eight years it was pretty noticeable -- still quite readable though.
 
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