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I must be part of an elite group of the toughest, most courageous men on the planet.....

¨Probably????" more concerned about a table saw? There is no probably to it. There are times I scare myself, get too nervous, and abort the cut I´m trying to make with a table saw. I guess to be fair, I do occasionally re-saw lumber (example, turning a 2x6 into 2 1x6s) and make other rather unorthodox and dangerous cuts. The worst times are when I´m making a kind of scary cut on a figured piece of walnut or maple, and I get nervous and want to abort the cut but I don´t want to risk losing nice (and quite valuable) lumber.

At any rate, yeah I am kinda into the ¨manly¨ fashion of how using straights feel, but it´s more than that for me. I´m into vintage straights, and for me it´s almost a connection with the past. Nothing like taking an implement made nearly 200 years ago, bringing it back to life, and getting far better results than you would get with the modern shaving solution. I was never really scared of shaving with a straight. Maybe a little nervous the first few times, but not scared. I would have started 10 or more years before I did, but the outlay on a straight, strop, and hones (and skill) required for straight shaving held me back. You really can get into to it for not as much money as most people make out, but I didn´t realize that years ago. I can say that B&B is much more open-minded to less expensive gear today than it was in 2008-2010. I wish I would´ve started 12 years ago, and not 2 years ago.

I don't miss my table saw. I have a basement woodshop and the noise and dust, let alone potential for injury, was enough for me to look into other options. I much more enjoy cutting with a handsaw than sticking my fingers inches from a carbide tipped 5000rpm blade.

I still have table saw for home projects or long rip cuts, but for most projects my handsaws are faster and more enjoyable for me. Obviously if you have a permanent mounted cabinet saw handsaws are not faster, but for me to wheel out the saw, hook up dust collection and set up the saw I can just grab a saw and start cutting
 
I always found that kind of funny. The whole thing of how "hardcore" and "Manly" and "Badass" you have to be to use a straight razor. I agree, it's way too overblown and hyped up and whatever. What's more, I don't find it to be true.

I mean, does using a straight razor require the mastering of skill? Yes. And courage? Yes. And learning a whole new skillset to keep it going? Yes.

But it's hardly as elitist as one might think. People seem to forget that for centuries before safety-razors came out, this is how all men shaved. It's hardly a revelation. Somehow, I feel that putting it up on a pedestal kind of makes a mockery of the effort required to actually master its use.

I mean, it is a manly way to shave, but it's not as life threatening as some make it out to be. But I agree that it's not elitist.
 
Number 8 is probably the best way to go.
Went out with someone like that once. It was fun at the time but if she got on top you'd need a snorkel just to breath.
 
I will buck the tread and say that there is one dangerous aspect of using a SR. It is when that razor
slips from your grasp. I have dropped my SR twice and a DE once. I do not consider myself a klutz or
someone who is inattentive. However, being around shaving soap, shaving cream, sponges and wet brushes,
you can lose your grip. In the case of the DE, I was so nonplussed that I considered trying to catch it. But with
the SR's, I jumped back at least a foot and gave that falling blade a clear berth. A falling SR can cause some real
physical damage to yourself and the razor. I was lucky the first time and the razor bounced off the floor with zero damage.
The second time, the razor caught the edge of the sink. The blade was majorly chipped and one of the scales broke.
Actually, I was lucky both times, since I did not get sliced. I haven't dropped a SR in the past 18 months (knock on wood)
and I am extremely vigilant now, especially when it comes to drying my hands after reapplying soap/cream in between passes.

Long story short, proper shaving with a SR is not a especially dangerous proposition. However, dropping one is...
 
I will buck the tread and say that there is one dangerous aspect of using a SR. It is when that razor
slips from your grasp. I have dropped my SR twice and a DE once. I do not consider myself a klutz or
someone who is inattentive. However, being around shaving soap, shaving cream, sponges and wet brushes,
you can lose your grip. In the case of the DE, I was so nonplussed that I considered trying to catch it. But with
the SR's, I jumped back at least a foot and gave that falling blade a clear berth. A falling SR can cause some real
physical damage to yourself and the razor. I was lucky the first time and the razor bounced off the floor with zero damage.
The second time, the razor caught the edge of the sink. The blade was majorly chipped and one of the scales broke.
Actually, I was lucky both times, since I did not get sliced. I haven't dropped a SR in the past 18 months (knock on wood)
and I am extremely vigilant now, especially when it comes to drying my hands after reapplying soap/cream in between passes.

Long story short, proper shaving with a SR is not a especially dangerous proposition. However, dropping one is...
I will buck the tread and say that there is one dangerous aspect of using a SR. It is when that razor
slips from your grasp. I have dropped my SR twice and a DE once. I do not consider myself a klutz or
someone who is inattentive. However, being around shaving soap, shaving cream, sponges and wet brushes,
you can lose your grip. In the case of the DE, I was so nonplussed that I considered trying to catch it. But with
the SR's, I jumped back at least a foot and gave that falling blade a clear berth. A falling SR can cause some real
physical damage to yourself and the razor. I was lucky the first time and the razor bounced off the floor with zero damage.
The second time, the razor caught the edge of the sink. The blade was majorly chipped and one of the scales broke.
Actually, I was lucky both times, since I did not get sliced. I haven't dropped a SR in the past 18 months (knock on wood)
and I am extremely vigilant now, especially when it comes to drying my hands after reapplying soap/cream in between passes.

Long story short, proper shaving with a SR is not a especially dangerous proposition. However, dropping one is...
I am definitely vigilant about keeping my hands and the razor dry.
 

Steve56

Ask me about shaving naked!
I will buck the tread and say that there is one dangerous aspect of using a SR. It is when that razor
slips from your grasp. I have dropped my SR twice and a DE once. I do not consider myself a klutz or
someone who is inattentive. However, being around shaving soap, shaving cream, sponges and wet brushes,
you can lose your grip. In the case of the DE, I was so nonplussed that I considered trying to catch it. But with
the SR's, I jumped back at least a foot and gave that falling blade a clear berth. A falling SR can cause some real
physical damage to yourself and the razor. I was lucky the first time and the razor bounced off the floor with zero damage.
The second time, the razor caught the edge of the sink. The blade was majorly chipped and one of the scales broke.
Actually, I was lucky both times, since I did not get sliced. I haven't dropped a SR in the past 18 months (knock on wood)
and I am extremely vigilant now, especially when it comes to drying my hands after reapplying soap/cream in between passes.

Long story short, proper shaving with a SR is not a especially dangerous proposition. However, dropping one is...

See my avatar ….
 
I don't know if They can be called straights or not but I shave around 50% half DE shavettes and 50% DE safety razors. I love shaving with both. When people ask how I shave I jut tell them but when I show them a photo of a shavette they lose their minds trying to explain that DEs are just as dangerous they look at you like your heads cut. Pun intended 😉
 
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