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Hydrogen Peroxide to clean a razor?

Anyone ever tried hydrogen peroxide to clean up an old razor? I have boiled hydrogen peroxide in a microwave and then soaked old green copper indian head pennies in it until it stops bubbling. It cleans them very nicely without harming them. It doesn't get rid of all the patina but cleans very good.
 

nemo

Cheaper than ink
No, just use soap, warm water, and a toothbrush. Don't use harsh chemicals and/or oxidizing agents, especially on silver.

Well, unless you don't want the plating.
 
It takes awhile for the reaction to take place, but eventually hydrogen peroxide (H202) breaks down into water and oxygen. When you heat it, the reaction happens faster. But it's not instantaneous.

I don't know how good a cleanser hydrogen peroxide is for razors. Never tried it. Give it a shot and report the results!
 
Anyone ever tried hydrogen peroxide to clean up an old razor? I have boiled hydrogen peroxide in a microwave and then soaked old green copper indian head pennies in it until it stops bubbling. It cleans them very nicely without harming them. It doesn't get rid of all the patina but cleans very good.
I prefer to use tomato ketchup. I think it is the vinegar in it that does most of the work. Try it sometime; no heat involved.
 
Personally I would not recommend it. H202 is an oxidizing agent, and hot it's even stronger. It will cause corrosion, i.e. oxidation as it gives up the extra oxygen molecule. If there is a bit of dried blood present the action will be stronger and more pronounced due to peroxiszce enzymes present in blood. If the razor contains any steel parts, rust is a given. Use soap & water or something like scrubbing bubbles, and rinse well.







i
 
Not recommended with nickel and brass in stronger concentrations. Any any organics or alkalis (like soap) left will really react.
I'd suggest the old standbys, Dawn and water followed by scrubbing bubbles without bleach.
 
My other hobby is searching for old coins and relics with a metal detector. I have used this method to clean old indian head pennies that have been in the ground for 100 years or more. All of those pennies have a green patina which has formed along with years of caked crud. The hydrogen peroxide takes care of the crud without affecting the patina or causing any further damage as long as you don't leave it in too long. I really don't know how it might affect the finish on a brass razor.
 

nemo

Cheaper than ink
I have used this method to clean old indian head pennies that have been in the ground for 100 years or more ... I really don't know how it might affect the finish on a brass razor.

Gillette didn't make any bare brass razors. The peroxide will damage, tarnish, and spot the plating -- whether it be nickel, silver, rhodium, or gold. How long you soak it will of course have a bearing on this, if you want to chance it go ahead, but you've been warned. These aren't copper pennies.
 
Hydrogen peroxide is cheap & there are a lot of worthless old razors around, so I nominate robertj to do the dirty dunk & report back.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
My process is to boil water. Put a bunch of razors in a bowl. Squirt dish soap all over them. Pour boiling water on the razors. Let them soak until the water cools. Take one at a time out and scrub it with a toothbrush. Let them dry, and start using them.

If they are really crummy looking I may use toothpaste and scrub a bit more. Maybe a toothpick to pick away the crud. I know they will never look NOS so I don't spend a lot of time trying to make them look perfect.
 
My methods:

Nickel: cook in water+dishwashing liquid for 10-15 minutes.
Gold: soak in warm water+dishwashing liquid apply barbicide before use.
Silver: soak in warm water + dishwashing liquid. Then boiling water+baking soda+aluminium foil to remove patina. Apply barbicide before use.
Brass: as nickel, then polishing.

Adam
 
Very informative thread!

I've never done more than hot water, dish soap + toothbrush. I guess in a case of severe corrosion more extreme measures may be required.
 
Not recommended with nickel and brass in stronger concentrations. Any any organics or alkalis (like soap) left will really react.
I'd suggest the old standbys, Dawn and water followed by scrubbing bubbles without bleach.

Yup. Tried and true, works every time....
 
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