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How to tell if a DE Razor is aggressive or mild ?

How does one tell if a double edge razor is aggressive, mild, or in between ? Do we base it off of our experience with having a DE razor, or is there a way to determine it based off the angle of the head or how it bends the blade ?

I dont recall ever seeing manufacturers posting their DE razors with such statistics. But someone will chime in if I am wrong.
 
How does one tell if a double edge razor is aggressive, mild, or in between ? Do we base it off of our experience with having a DE razor, or is there a way to determine it based off the angle of the head or how it bends the blade ?

I dont recall ever seeing manufacturers posting their DE razors with such statistics. But someone will chime in if I am wrong.
Some manufactures do have a # or dot system of identifying levels of aggression.
Another way is word of mouth by other folks who might have that razor and are willing to mention their experiences IMO.
 
Determining whether a razor is mild, neutral, or aggressive is a judgment call. Some shavers may disagree, but often there is a consensus. Only the individual shaver can decide.

Let's also remember the toughness of the whiskers, the prep, the blade, the soap, and the shaver's technique also contribute to the determination.
 
You can always ask or do your own research on the forums. Most vintage and modern razors are well documented and tested by lots of folks here and unless you find something extremely rare or you get your hands on a brand new modern razor that no one before has used, you will find everything you need to know.
 
Ask here at B&B. Research here at B&B. Also, I have found this Razorock chart to be helpful especially since they have competing brands listed at the bottom. But use it as a guide, not as cold hard fact.
 
If your asking about Razors, asking folks on the forum is good. But what is aggressive for some is not for others so ask many people or read lots of comments. You can also learn about the measurements on the blade angle, blade exposure, and blade gap. This can give you a good idea too.

If you are talking razor blades, that depends on each person's experience and skin type. Different story.
 
I've been on this site over a dozen years and I still have no concept of angle, exposure and gap. To me, how comfortable the razor feels in your hand is my #1. I'm a creature of habit. I happen to prefer handles at a certain length and thickness. Sometimes DE's, just a quarter inch longer, forcing me to change my grip, throw me off. My advice is to find a DE that feels natural in your hand to begin with. Once you get the technique down, you can always adjust aggressiveness with blades, or move to a more aggressive DE.
 
My criteria for how aggressive or mild a DE razor is by the Blade Feel. If I feel a ton of blade on the skin, I'll put it as aggressive. If I can barely feel the blade, I'll put it as mild. There are also a lot of razors in between the two.

There are some razors that are widely accepted as mild/aggressive razors. For example, DE89/34C are generally accepted as Mild while R41/Gilette Old Type are generally accepted as aggressive.
 
It may be an oversimplification but I always think of an aggressive razor as one that presents a range of shaving angles. A mild razor only works at one specific angle. A Blue Tip SuperSpeed, one of my favorites, gives a great shave if you get the angle right. Most people consider it mild.
 
Ask here at B&B. Research here at B&B. Also, I have found this Razorock chart to be helpful especially since they have competing brands listed at the bottom. But use it as a guide, not as cold hard fact.
This. The chart is very helpful.
 
Checking the forums is a good place to start.

In the end, however, you need to try things for yourself! Just my $0.02!
 
Blade exposure and gap are general measures, more of either/both = more aggressive shave. I finally located a spare baseplate for my Asylum Evolution. OEM was about the mildest, most unsatisfying shaves I've had since trying Superspeeds. I missed the Model T plates, but saw this on ebay a few days ago. I couldn't tell if it was the T, and the seller couldn't remember, so I bough it on a gamble.

Nope, same as my original plate. I spent about an hour and a half last night with the new plate, my 400 & 600 diamond plates, and some 1000 grit wet/dry paper. I lowered the guard/comb on both sides the better part of a millimeter, and finished it with the 1000 all over. Definitely more blade feel, but the tightly clamped blade and top cap angle, along with maintaining the guard's width, made for a very pleasant, yet notably more efficient shave. That was last night, and I've only got light stubble now. Easily equal to my Karve and RRs, slightly behind the Asylum. Interestingly, I've had a nick or two from my newly acquired Darwin, not a trace with my home-made Model T, both with Nacets.
 
I would echo the idea of starting with comments on the forums and then evaluate the razor based on your style of shaving. Gap in of itself is not a fair indicator. Although I have not used one, the Wolfman WR-2 gaps range form large to very large but they are regarded as smooth. Blade exposure is also not a complete indicator as many positive exposure razors can also be very smooth. The combination of a large gap and a very positive blade exposure would probably make for an aggressive razor, but also be mindful of the confusion between efficient and aggressive.

I have settled in with a Blackland Blackbird SB which many (especially those that have never used it) would call aggressive. I find it very efficient and also smooth but by no means aggressive.

When looking for a new razor, most of the better companies including Blackland and Timeless offer a 30 day trial period with virtually no risk if the razor is not right. That would be my suggestion, try it and keep it if you like it and return it if you don't. Also there is no need to feel guilty about returning a razor. I spoke to Shane at Blackland and he encourages it and says that he has built returns into his business model.
 
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