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How to get down in the jimps...

I've got a semi-crusty Moler that I'm attempting to restore. It's pretty much black all over, but I'm doing pretty well at cleaning the blade.

My question is: How do I get into the grooves to clean them? I'm using a Dremel right now, and I can't seem to get down into the jimps to get the gunk out.

Ideas?
 
I've got a semi-crusty Moler that I'm attempting to restore. It's pretty much black all over, but I'm doing pretty well at cleaning the blade.

My question is: How do I get into the grooves to clean them? I'm using a Dremel right now, and I can't seem to get down into the jimps to get the gunk out.

Ideas?
Floss. :biggrin:
I read it somewhere, but I think you just put the rubbing compound on it, and rub the floss back and forth in the jimps.
 
If you have the 3m bristle discs, those work the fastest and best. IME. But they're pricey. Set me back a pretty penny.
 
There's also a regular, non-powered wire brush. I have one about the size of a toothbrush.

No, I don't use it on my teeth, it makes my gums bleed.
 
Here is a short list of ways to clean down inside the grooves of the jimps (list in no particular order):

  • Wire brushes (either hand or rotary). These work well and pretty fast. Generally speaking the little rotary wire brushes are softer than the steel of the razor so you don't get scratches. If really in doubt, use brass brushes (hand or rotary), but be aware that this can sometimes leave a light coating of brass on the steel, although that will come off later with a little regular polish.

  • Glass fiber erasers (see article http://www.badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread.php?t=56742&highlight=wire+brush). These work pretty well, and you can even extend the glass fibers to get down between the scales at the tang end of the razor if you are not comfortable with unpinning and removing the blade.

  • I also like to use wooden coffee stirrers (thin popsicle sticks), toothpicks and bamboo food skewers. Any of these can be used as very soft and harmless scrapers (to get rid of hardened soap scum), but may also be charged with either polish or a mild abrasive (chromium oxide, for example) to really get the grooves properly clean. These are great to use when you have to scrub the gimps on that part of the blade down between the scales. It can be slow going this way, but it works and it is very kind to the steel. Best thing about this one is that the stuff is cheap. You break one, toss it and grab for another out of the box.

  • You can also just polish the grooves clean with a rotary polishing mop charged with a light abrasive compound. This also won't get down between the scales if the blade is still pinned.

  • The idea with the tooth floss and rubbing compound sounds pretty interesting.

  • Likewise, the 3M brand bristle disks sound interesting, although I haven't any experience with those. I have little rotary bristle brushes made with a heavy sort of natural hair bristle , but they don't really clean the grooves effectively.

  • A last option (if the gimps are heavily soiled or rusted) is to grab for a soft steel nail (or other bit of soft steel). Do note that I am stressing the word SOFT, as you want the nail to take any scratching and not the other way around. I have done this on occasion and it does work, but I leave this only as a last (desperate) option. The same goes for a hobby knife blade or what have you. DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK.
 
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