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Houseplants + ice?

Howdy,

One of the larger houseplants has a drinking problem. If it looks parched, I place it in the sink and slowly give it a drink. However, it will only absorb a wee bit of water. Then it drains out the bottom. Poor soil, I imagine. So, on to plan B.

Tried something new. Feeding it two or three ice cubes a day. It has never looked happier.

Mac
 
Cool, but thats because it is getting water the soil should hold. Try either putting in a larger pot with some mix to hold moisture, or remove it, shake out the bottom old soil and put new stuff in , dont remove all, just about an inch or so.


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What kind of plant is it? I owned an interior landscaping company many years ago. Watering needs varies depending on kind of plant, light and such. I had on employee who used the ice trick on orchids in low light. Some plants need to drain completely or they will get root rot.
 
Soil mix is likely peat based which will repel water when dry. It needs contact time with the water for the water to be absorbed. If you put the pot in a large tub, watered it until water ran through then left the pot sitting in the run-through it will get absorbed into the soil in the pot, then you water again until run-through let it absorb repeat until water is no longer absorbed. OR

Set the pot in the tub with a couple inches of water and allow capillary action to draw water into the pot until the surface of the soil feels wet to the touch, you may need to add more water to the tub as the water gets absorbed. When no more water is getting absorbed it's 'watered'. Take note of the pot's weight when fully watered, water again when the pot feels noticeably lighter.

dave
 
Has anyone tried this with African violets? It the one plant that I always seem to over water.

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African violets, try putting a wick into the bottom holes in the pot and raise the pot above the water with rocks or something.
 

Intrigued

Bigfoot & Bagel aficionado.
It would be hard to do that with African Violets because of the way they grow hanging over their pots.
I have pretty good luck with mine by keeping them potted in terra-cotta pots with matching saucers and watering them from the bottom by filling the saucer with water once a week. Plastic pots aren't as forgiving if you do overwater.
 
African violets, try putting a wick into the bottom holes in the pot and raise the pot above the water with rocks or something.
It would be hard to do that with African Violets because of the way they grow hanging over their pots.
I have pretty good luck with mine by keeping them potted in terra-cotta pots with matching saucers and watering them from the bottom by filling the saucer with water once a week. Plastic pots aren't as forgiving if you do overwater.
Thanks for the suggestions. I will have to try them again. I enjoy plants, something I inherited from my grandmother. It would be great to have plants in the house again.

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DoctorShavegood

"A Boy Named Sue"
Soil mix is likely peat based which will repel water when dry. It needs contact time with the water for the water to be absorbed. If you put the pot in a large tub, watered it until water ran through then left the pot sitting in the run-through it will get absorbed into the soil in the pot, then you water again until run-through let it absorb repeat until water is no longer absorbed. OR

Set the pot in the tub with a couple inches of water and allow capillary action to draw water into the pot until the surface of the soil feels wet to the touch, you may need to add more water to the tub as the water gets absorbed. When no more water is getting absorbed it's 'watered'. Take note of the pot's weight when fully watered, water again when the pot feels noticeably lighter.

dave


+1 Place your plant in a pot saucer fill the pot saucer up with water and let capillary action pull water up into the soil. Depending on how dry the soil is you may need to repeat adding water.
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
What type of plant is it?

I suspect you have one that is supposed to be in very stony soil, rather than the sort of vegetative-matter-rich soil common with potted plants.

In other words, this plant does well when it's on the rocks.
 
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