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Hot dogs anyone?

I used to love hot dogs from those Sabrett stands in manhattan when I was younger but now I only eat them if we've got a barbeque going on. There's a Nathan's on the way to my high school and I stopped by a bunch of times pre-pandemic. My uncle makes his own sausage for every fourth of July and I enjoy it quite a bit when he brings them over, nothing beats them for me. Unfortunately, his home lies on the west coast so I don't get to eat the rest of his cooking. In terms of toppings, I'm good with just about everything, but I particularly like sauerkraut, relish, and mustard. I used to just get ketchup back when I feared vegetables, hah.
 

TexLaw

Fussy Evil Genius
Contributor
Let's not forget a New Orleans Lucky Dog. I shudder to think hour many of those I've eaten in various stages and forms of consciousness, and I've loved each and every one.

Even the stand in the dadgum airport is good.
 
Rarely had what you guys call hot dogs, although I used to live near Mildenhall and would go to the annual airshow, where various stall were set up selling these and burgers, with others selling cold Budweisers from about 10am(!) Given my last visit was 20+ years ago I can't remember much about them...
 

ackvil

Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
My daughter-in-law is from the Philippines. A while back a Philippine-based fast-food operation opened in our town, Jollibees. They feature two ways to have hog dogs. One if for breakfast with an egg and garlic rice.

1618239377172.png
Another way is for lunch called a cheesy hot dot. It can come with some French fries.
1618239358341.png
She said there is a third dish called Kawaling Pinoy (I'm not sure of the spelling) that is spaghetti with ground beef, hot dogs, peppers, Philippine ketchup, onions and other ingredients.

1618239755445.png

She said they use Phillipino ketchup that is made with bananas and numerous spices and some dark rum. She adds some hot sauce to it - but then again she adds hot sauce to everything! I don't like it with hot dogs but it is very good with grilled chicken or pork chops.

So, the U.S. hot dog is an international dish.
 
I’m not a fan of boiled hot dogs either. Unless it’s a ballpark dog (usually accompanied by several beers)
Are you talking about the brand ballpark? I grew up on boiled ballpark brand dog's. They were my Dad's favorite.

Or are you talking about a boiled dog at the baseball game? I've seen them use ballpark brand dog's sold there too. But not lately. It's usually Canadian Jumbo brand.
 
My daughter-in-law is from the Philippines. A while back a Philippine-based fast-food operation opened in our town, Jollibees. They feature two ways to have hog dogs. One if for breakfast with an egg and garlic rice.

View attachment 1250343
Another way is for lunch called a cheesy hot dot. It can come with some French fries.
View attachment 1250342
She said there is a third dish called Kawaling Pinoy (I'm not sure of the spelling) that is spaghetti with ground beef, hot dogs, peppers, Philippine ketchup, onions and other ingredients.

View attachment 1250344

She said they use Phillipino ketchup that is made with bananas and numerous spices and some dark rum. She adds some hot sauce to it - but then again she adds hot sauce to everything! I don't like it with hot dogs but it is very good with grilled chicken or pork chops.

So, the U.S. hot dog is an international dish.
I'm not sure the US can claim the hot dog as its invention. The Germans and Austrians probably have that honor, given that they invented the wienerwurst and the frankfurter. These sausages then made their way across the Atlantic with the many German and Austrian immigrants to the US. Though, I do wonder whether the decision to put the sausage on a bun was an American innovation. Even then, I wouldn't be surprised if the innovator was a German/Austrian American.
 
I used to make the same dish back when I was an undergrad.

By boiling the hot dogs together with the spaghetti you improve the taste. You should not put it on a plate though, this culinary masterpiece is preferably eaten straight from the casserole.
In junior high and high school, my friends and I used to make spaghetti with Ragu/Prego spaghetti sauce (with meat), hot sauce, and chopped hot dog wieners. Add a little Parmesan cheese before serving and it made for a great snack (technically, it could've been a meal, but we were growing boys, so it served as a snack).
 

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
Are you talking about the brand ballpark? I grew up on boiled ballpark brand dog's. They were my Dad's favorite.

Or are you talking about a boiled dog at the baseball game? I've seen them use ballpark brand dog's sold there too. But not lately. It's usually Canadian Jumbo brand.
Oh ya I was thinking about the general hot dog served at a baseball game. Good question as to the brand. One would hope it’s a major brand.
 
I'm not sure the US can claim the hot dog as its invention. The Germans and Austrians probably have that honor, given that they invented the wienerwurst and the frankfurter. These sausages then made their way across the Atlantic with the many German and Austrian immigrants to the US. Though, I do wonder whether the decision to put the sausage on a bun was an American innovation. Even then, I wouldn't be surprised if the innovator was a German/Austrian American.
The sausage on a bun, like the hamburger on a bun, came about because of the 1907 Worlds Fair in Chicago. Vendors needed to make it easier for people to eat and walk as opposed to sitting at a table to eat. Hamburgers, btw, originated as Frikadelle (chopped meat patties) from Hamburg. Hot Dogs are Frankfurters from frankfurter sausages from, where else, Frankfurt.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
The sausage on a bun, like the hamburger on a bun, came about because of the 1907 Worlds Fair in Chicago. Vendors needed to make it easier for people to eat and walk as opposed to sitting at a table to eat. Hamburgers, btw, originated as Frikadelle (chopped meat patties) from Hamburg. Hot Dogs are Frankfurters from frankfurter sausages from, where else, Frankfurt.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Yeah, I'm familiar with that story, though there are also stories that German(-speaking) immigrants in the US were eating sausages in a bun before that world's fair.

Also, it's not clear that the frankfurter, instead of the wienerwurst is the progenitor of the American hot dog. In fact, given that hot dogs are referred to as wieners (as well as franks) suggests that a link with wienerwurst sausages. This idea is made more probable when one considers that a major hot dog manufacturer in Chicago, Vienna Beef, was founded by Austrian immigrants well before the 1907 World's Fair. In fact, the company's founders initially sold their Vienna style sausages at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and were so successful that they decided to continue making and selling their sausages in Chicago, thus founding Vienna Beef. (Of course, whether they served their sausages on bread, at that time, is unclear.)

Of course, other German and Austrian immigrants had brought wienerwurst and frankfurters (along with other sausages) to the US for over 100 years by then. Whether any of them, their children, or colleagues ever thought to put a sausage between some bread is unknown.
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Had "hot dog bean bake" for lunch. Or my wife's take on it anyway. Delicious.
I should have added that she has streamlined the process over the years. We did have a window, and a pot to throw urine out of when we wed, but cheap meals were the norm.

She used to bake little individual dishes in ramekins. Now she just makes bisquick type biscuits and bakes them separately as the beans and franks cook stovetop, and we add the biscuits on the top of our individual bowls.

It is funny how when I was a young man I wished I could provide more budgetary expenditures on our pantry supplies, but now that we are in our golden years we so often revisit the foods that reminds us of our shared struggles to make ends meet.

Advice to young married folk: save money by eating at home, ALWAYS get a doggy bag, and ALWAYS compliment her cooking. We have found that building wealth for the tough times is most easily in the pantry. You can't control SO MANY of your monthly bills, but this is one. Never turn down the bounty of someone else's garden, learn to can and preserve food from your own garden... okay. End of sermon.
 

oc_in_fw

Fridays are Fishtastic!
Contributor
Well it has turned Hot Dog season here finally so this is timely. I'm partial to jumbo dogs from either Hebrew National or Dearborn Sausage Co. My favorite is a Cincinnati Chili "coney" with the chili, onions & shredded cheese (yellow mustard). I will also do a New York dog with onion sauce and kraut (coarse deli mustard). A good Chicago style dog is for when I am feeling the need for veggies, and lastly a plain one with Cleveland Stadium mustard when speed or nostalgia is of the essence ..
Me on all accounts, especially Stadium Mustard. Saw a lot of Indians games in the 80s.
 
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