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Honing advise

Hello everyone, One of my SR was beginning to tug and cause irritation so I decided I would try to rehone it. I recently purchased a Cnat for this purpose.
I lapped the stone and went to work doing what I have watched from others online (zero pressure with free flowing water) for about 100 or so passes... Went to test it and it's duller then before? Won't even cut the hairs on my arm

I'm not one to blame hardware because I'm sure I'm the one at fault, but I really could use advice on where to go from here.
I have a small dubl duck dry hone (maybe 2x4) and the Cnat mentioned previously. I was thinking to grab an 5k and 12k synthetic and maybe start back on the 5k to see if I can sharpen this edge...
What would be your next move?
TIA
 
You probabbly pooched the bevel. Is there and damage to the edge with the naked eye? You are most likely going to need to reset the bevel and a full hone. If you don't have the hardware you can send it out to be honed. I can help u out, feel free to send me a pm.

If you don't trust you hardware perhaps someone familiar with JNATs could put some work in on your stone. Then you would know if it is you or your stone.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
 
Try a little pressure on the Cnat, gripping the shank more from side to side with a slight turn of the wrist during the flip, rather than the top-to-bottom grip, pencil-roll flip as often recommended. 3 very short lateral X-strokes (1-2 inches in length of pass) to clear the edge, followed by a few more longitudinal X-strokes using most of the stone's length and backing off on the pressure. Running water isn't necessary, standing water on the surface of the stone should be enough. Ditto for the stropping, minus the water.
 
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Yes, if you’re serious about sharpening/honing your own edges, a 5 and 12k is a good start, but they are the beginning of polishing (5k) to finishing (12k). You can get a few razors honed for you for the money you’ll spend.
But then you’ll be misssing out on half the fun of the trip down the rabbit hole.
It’s nice to have a 8k to go in between the 5 & 12. Along with a 1k for bevel setting, but then all you need is a 3k to work up to the 5k, however it’s nice to have a 2k to smooth out the deep striations from the 1k, and we haven’t even started out on the endless possibilities of finishes. Jk, no I’m not, yes I am. :crying:
Oh yes, you might want to pick up a loupe if you don’t have one, and a sharpie, their probably the most inexpensive, and useful tools in the journey.
 
You probabbly pooched the bevel. Is there and damage to the edge with the naked eye? You are most likely going to need to reset the bevel and a full hone. If you don't have the hardware you can send it out to be honed. I can help u out, feel free to send me a pm.

If you don't trust you hardware perhaps someone familiar with JNATs could put some work in on your stone. Then you would know if it is you or your stone.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
I was afraid of this but excepted it was what happened. No visible damage to the blade and the bevel is flat. I was curious if the owner prior used tape or not... I didn't, but if he did could that have caused this kind of issue?

I appreciate the offer to hone and I will keep it in mind. If possible I would like to see if I can get this fixed myself for the understanding.

Try a little pressure on the Cnat, gripping the shank more from side to side with a slight turn of the wrist during the flip, rather than the top-to-bottom grip, pencil-roll flip as often recommended. 3 very short lateral X-strokes (1-2 inches in length of pass) to clear the edge, followed by a few more longitudinal X-strokes using most of the stone's length and backing off on the pressure. Running water isn't necessary, standing water on the surface of the stone should be enough. Ditto for the stropping, minus the water.
I will give it a try. I didn't get a slurry stone, can I use a piece of my WD to make some slurry? Or don't bother?

Yes, if you’re serious about sharpening/honing your own edges, a 5 and 12k is a good start, but they are the beginning of polishing (5k) to finishing (12k). You can get a few razors honed for you for the money you’ll spend.
But then you’ll be misssing out on half the fun of the trip down the rabbit hole.
It’s nice to have a 8k to go in between the 5 & 12. Along with a 1k for bevel setting, but then all you need is a 3k to work up to the 5k, however it’s nice to have a 2k to smooth out the deep striations from the 1k, and we haven’t even started out on the endless possibilities of finishes. Jk, no I’m not, yes I am. :crying:
Oh yes, you might want to pick up a loupe if you don’t have one, and a sharpie, their probably the most inexpensive, and useful tools in the journey.
To each there own on the stones in their arsenal 😆 I was thinking to start off with the essential components hone the blade. 1k, 5k, 8k, 12k, finisher (optional)
@SliceOfLife said they just just DMT EF and EE for 1-8k... Might do that but I'm not sure
 
I was curious if the owner prior used tape or not... I didn't, but if he did could that have caused this kind of issue?
Possibly, but it’s not difficult to find out if it is the issue.
I’ll reiterate my original post. Are you familiar with using a sharpie on the edge?
It will let you know if you’re working at the Apex of the bevel.
 
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If the previous bevel set used tape, and you didnt, you would have not affected the edge. Since the cnat is slower, perhaps use the marker trick and try a piece of tape or 2. With the cnat you arent cutting metal like a bevel setter, so not much to lose right now for you.
 
Possibly, but it’s not difficult to find out if it is the issue.
I’ll reiterate my original post. Are you familiar with using a sharpie on the edge?
It will let you know if you’re working at the Apex of the bevel.
I saw a YouTube of a shaver discussing it but I'll look over it again to make sure I understand completely
 
All it is in your case is to color the entire bevel with sharpie and as you you look to see if the marker remains. If it does remain, you havent affected it on the hone.

look at it after one stroke to see if bevel is affected. It’s also a good tool to spot check areas that you feel arent getting there.
 

RenoRichard

Contributor
+1-razor pic please. Many possibilities. Also, your barber's hone may be okay to reset a bevel. Have you posting a pic of that yet?
 

steveclarkus

Goose Poop Connoisseur
Hello everyone, One of my SR was beginning to tug and cause irritation so I decided I would try to rehone it. I recently purchased a Cnat for this purpose.
I lapped the stone and went to work doing what I have watched from others online (zero pressure with free flowing water) for about 100 or so passes... Went to test it and it's duller then before? Won't even cut the hairs on my arm

I'm not one to blame hardware because I'm sure I'm the one at fault, but I really could use advice on where to go from here.
I have a small dubl duck dry hone (maybe 2x4) and the Cnat mentioned previously. I was thinking to grab an 5k and 12k synthetic and maybe start back on the 5k to see if I can sharpen this edge...
What would be your next move?
TIA
The cnat is a notoriously slow hone. If you don’t want to dump a ton of money 💰 on stones. Get lapping film. I prefer it to synthetic stones and have used it with excellent results for the past two years.
 
Don't use W&D to raise slurry. If one one or two SiC particles are released, it will ruin your edge.

The razor looks like it was honed with tape, but I could be wrong. Try to get the focus on the spine where it makes contact with the hone, and get the light to shine on it a bit better.

It's actually easier to judge by looking at the undercut - the way water runs up the edge as you hone it. You don't need to move the razor more than 1-2mm on the stone to see this. It's actually better to go slow and make short movements. A good undercut will show as soon as you move the blade. If it's not there, it means you're not affecting the apex, and hence need to apply 1 layer of tape, or reset the bevel without tape, for which you need something like a 1K or 2K stone.
 
^^^
That would be like waiting until tomorrow paper arrives to do today's crossword puzzle, and having the answers in front of you. What’s the fun in that?
Instead you can engage a dozen, or so people, with like interests, over a couple or few days, across the globe to speculate on a simple issue they can be fixed it 15 minutes with the right skill set, and a few of the proper stones or lapping film.
That’s entertainment.
jk
 
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