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Home Security/Deterrent Measures So That You Don't HAVE To Shoot Someone.

I wonder about that. I live in a semi rural area large lots in our area 1-3 acre in size. A few years ago our car and truck were burgeralized. I had walk lights and some overhead led rope lights in the carport since often being called out at night I did not like to get out in the dark to get back to the house. I had a gun and a small bag with a bunch of chargers and cords for iphone, kindles, ect stolen. Sheriffs dept told me a lot of vehicles were being burgeralized. A neighbor had placed his wallet and credit card stolen from a work truck and went back into his house for something, came back and it was gone. Less than an hour later something had been charged at McDonalds, then apparently they were smart and discarded it after one use. I had the serial number and model of the gun recorded and sheriffs deputy said most people did not and that if it was recovered I would get it back, Thats been 4 years ago not and no word on it, not that I would want it back at this point. It was one of the big Para Ordnance LDA(light double action) semi autos, so I think if they tried to take it apart without proper instructions it would be rendered useless.
I see how in a semi rural area my advice would not fly. I live in a fairly low crime area where our homes are fairly close together. Someone messing around under the lights would be seen by one of the neighbors.
 
Friends laugh every time they come over and say it’s like the opening/unlocking of a prison cell.
Here are a few outside photos at night and a photo of one of our doors.
And after all that if they are still wanting inside they can have our possessions if we are not home.
If we are home well they had plenty of warning that they were not welcome.
Let 'em laugh! You'll almost definitely never have to deal with the psychological repercussions of blowing someone's face off in your entry foyer. I envy your security setup. Very nicely done.
 
And thanks for all of the great responses, guys. I'm working through them and implementing whatever I can. I didn't expect this to take off like it did.
 

martym

I Leave The Toilet Seat Up.
Contributor
Let 'em laugh! You'll almost definitely never have to deal with the psychological repercussions of blowing someone's face off in your entry foyer. I envy your security setup. Very nicely done.
Thank you!!
33+ years LEO
Kinda in the blood
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Man, believe me, I'd love nothing more. I daydream about a cabin in the middle of nowhere in Montana. On a daily basis.
I heard the folks in Alaska move to Hawaii in the worst part of winter. That's what I'd do if the War Department would let me!


Of course, if I keep on being such a thorn in her flesh she's liable to buy me a one way ticket!
 
Just my coupla cents:

Read somewhere about a couple who had double curtains at the windows: the ones you had to know how they worked to draw them closed, and the easy, obvious ones that a burglar would draw after breaking in, to cover him from prying eyes.

The easy ones had printed, facing outside, "DIAL 911", "BURGLAR INSIDE", and the likes.

Another layer.

Enviado desde mi SM-A520F mediante Tapatalk
 
Read years ago a compilation of interviews done of burglars who were incarcerated. The idea was to find out from these guys what they looked for in a house and how they did their job. Here are a few things that stuck in my mind:

1. One of the best deterrents is to have your drapes closed.

2. Leave the radio or TV turned on while gone. That signals someone is inside the house.

3. Some will have a clipboard, company hat, uniform. They go to a front door and leave a card stuck in the screen door. To the neighbors it looks like a sales call or the like. But they drive by in two days and if the card is still stuck in the door they know the house is empty.

4. Alarm signs in the front yard were not that effective as a deterrent.

5. Many were asked how they gained entry without leaving any sign. The consistent response was that the side door / back door was not locked. They just turned the handle and walked in.

6. They will never spend more than eight minutes in a house - they know where to go. Hit and run.

7. They will avoid a place where there is no escape if someone returns home. So they are not likely to go to a basement.

8. Dogs. It was not the size of the dog, it was the barking. They avoid any barking dog like the plague.

9. Leave a car in the driveway and have it moved every day.

10. They said you don't need to have a fortress, your place just needs to be less attractive to hit. Kind of like the two hikers who are startled by a bear. One sits right down and puts on his sneakers. The other said, "What good are those - you can't outrun the bear." The first said, "I don't have to, I just have to outrun you."
 

Brian C.

Contributor
Read years ago a compilation of interviews done of burglars who were incarcerated. The idea was to find out from these guys what they looked for in a house and how they did their job. Here are a few things that stuck in my mind:

1. One of the best deterrents is to have your drapes closed.

2. Leave the radio or TV turned on while gone. That signals someone is inside the house.

3. Some will have a clipboard, company hat, uniform. They go to a front door and leave a card stuck in the screen door. To the neighbors it looks like a sales call or the like. But they drive by in two days and if the card is still stuck in the door they know the house is empty.

4. Alarm signs in the front yard were not that effective as a deterrent.

5. Many were asked how they gained entry without leaving any sign. The consistent response was that the side door / back door was not locked. They just turned the handle and walked in.

6. They will never spend more than eight minutes in a house - they know where to go. Hit and run.

7. They will avoid a place where there is no escape if someone returns home. So they are not likely to go to a basement.

8. Dogs. It was not the size of the dog, it was the barking. They avoid any barking dog like the plague.

9. Leave a car in the driveway and have it moved every day.

10. They said you don't need to have a fortress, your place just needs to be less attractive to hit. Kind of like the two hikers who are startled by a bear. One sits right down and puts on his sneakers. The other said, "What good are those - you can't outrun the bear." The first said, "I don't have to, I just have to outrun you."
I remember watching that same show. Very informative.


BOSC;AoM; B.O.S.S.;Knight of the Veg Table;WISE;CoA;SASA;FOCS Lover
 
Dogs, big and little. Everything I have heard, it’s dogs that are one the biggest deterrents.
In my case, we have two. Any noise around my perimeter and my pit bull is on the scene in couple of seconds. I’ve been very impressed by this dog, being an absolute docile teddy bear 99% of the time, and if something is wrong, she is 100% tuned into the situation and responds accordingly. Very good about taking her queues from me and my wife without us having to give commands. 348BB85B-A80F-499D-BA43-80D942AC587F.jpeg
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Dogs, big and little. Everything I have heard, it’s dogs that are one the biggest deterrents.
In my case, we have two. Any noise around my perimeter and my pit bull is on the scene in couple of seconds. I’ve been very impressed by this dog, being an absolute docile teddy bear 99% of the time, and if something is wrong, she is 100% tuned into the situation and responds accordingly. Very good about taking her queues from me and my wife without us having to give commands. View attachment 1120035
The picture of contentment!
 

jar_

Contributor
Living in a 55 and older community where quite a few folk leave there garage door open most of the day and their garage walls are covered with the targets from the last range day also seems to help.

I know it helped me decide that this was the right neighborhood to move into.
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Living in a 55 and older community where quite a few folk leave there garage door open most of the day and their garage walls are covered with the targets from the last range day also seems to help.

I know it helped me decide that this was the right neighborhood to move into.
Can I sleep in your garage?

Sounds like the safest place in America right now...
 
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