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Green tea with roasted rice? Recommendations please

Wanting to explore the world of teas, I've been trying a few new things recently and came across a tea that seems to combine green tea with roasted rice. Now, I know absolutely nothing about tea except what I like, but I enjoy the mix of flavours in this variety. I'd be grateful if anyone could tell me what it's called and point me in the direction of any particularly good versions of it.
 
Yamamotoyama, Mountain Book Mountain?? Makes a good everyday Genmaicha(the type of tea). I drink it almost daily.
 
Wanting to explore the world of teas, I've been trying a few new things recently and came across a tea that seems to combine green tea with roasted rice. Now, I know absolutely nothing about tea except what I like, but I enjoy the mix of flavours in this variety. I'd be grateful if anyone could tell me what it's called and point me in the direction of any particularly good versions of it.
As has already been mentioned, it's called genmaicha. I suggest you just go to a tea (tea and coffee, etc.) shop and see what they have. In my experience, they usually have at least one genmaicha (which I've always found weird because I hardly know anyone besides myself who likes it). I'd say just pick one.

If they have more than one, I think that considering that it's a tea that you might strongly dislike (like lapsang souchong) it might be a good idea to perhaps not pick one that is rediculously expensive, and take a more moderately priced one so you can find out if it's a type of tea you'll like.
 
Thanks guys. I'm somewhat surprised to learn that it's considered an acquired taste, since for me it was love at first sip. Now I have quite a few more to sample, thanks.
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
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My friend who first introduced me to this tea called it Popcorn Tea, due to the popped rice kernels. Her parents are Japanese, the tea package was Japanese, and I've only come across this tea in Japanese restaurants, so I'm thinking it's a Japanese thing. You can probably get a bag of it in a decent-sized supermarket ... :biggrin1:
 
I enjoy genmaicha from time to time. It is an aquired taste if you're used to plain versions. Yamamotoyama seems to be the easiest brand to come by, but I've seen others. As for the quality of the other brands, I can't comment. Judging by the quality of their sencha and bancha, I would say yamamotoyama is a hair above average, a good and afordable brand.
 
It's a Japanese tea. The finer green and oolong teas are Chinese/Taiwanese. The best Chinese green tea is Dragon Well or Longjing. In the higher grades it is a light, mildly sweet, grassy tea.

Oolong tea is also good. Most oolongs come from Taiwan now days. Tai Kuan Yin is one of my favorites, having a mild fruity flavor. They come rolled up in gunpowder balls, usually.

Gunpowder green is a strong tea, not really good Chinese per se but sold to the British and early Americans, brewed very strong (5 minutes or so, unlike most green teas where 1- 1.5 minutes is best). This is the style of tea common drank in the the Arab world. Mix with a little mint leaves and a little sweetener and you have North African mint tea.
 
I've been dealing with www.uptontea.com for a long time.

They have three types of Gen-mai Cha (their spelling) two of them organic.

They always have something new and are helpful both on-line and over the phone.

boz
 
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