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Grandmas advice on repainting numbers on Gillette adjustable razors

@stoof2010 and I were chatting about using a brass punch make a razor handle and our conversation shifted towards the refurbishing a Gillette Slim adjustable. Instead of giving him advice, that he may not necessarily want.. haha.
I figured I’d just share with everyone!

Grandma previously had a hand painting business, back before costume jewelry and handmade showpieces (ie jewelry boxes) were manufactured overseas.

Here is grandmas specific method for repainting inside engravings or recesses:

*Specifically her method uses a lacquer based paint (which is also the type of paint, I believe, Gillette originally used).

Dilute necessary amount of paint with paint thinner to get the “right” consistency for what you’re filling in. Too thin, it’ll run off the brush and too thick, you’ll have to use too much pressure to release the paint out of the brush into the recessed surface.

Paint inside the engraving as best as possible with a fine tip brush, NOT worrying too much about going outside the lines.

Then let it set for a minute or so, just until the paint starts to lose its sheen.

Moisten a soft cloth with paint thinner, not too wet to where when you push against the razor the thinner will run off the cloth. Just damp.

Lightly run the moist cloth over the surface, allowing the thinner to just pull the layer of paint off that may have gotten outside the lines.

*If you push too hard, it should be fine because the paint itself already has thinner in it. Just don’t push TOO hard to where you push the cloth inside the engraving and take some paint out with you.

Although, sometimes, if you did make the lacquer paint mixture too thick, some excess thinner may just thin it right out perfectly. Finding the right consistency isn’t crucial but the process of using the cloth, damp with thinner, gets paint filled in perfectly.

I believe that sums it up haha hope this advice helps some fellas and feel free to shout out any tips yourself!
 
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I need to touch up some of the painting in the engraving on some of my matching seven-day sets of SR's. Your grandmother's advice is most welcome.

I'm thinking of using a black epoxy paint (if I can get it) or black nail polish lacquer.
 
Today I bought some black nail polish and applied it to the spine engraving (not etching) on one of my M7DS SR's. I used the brush that came with the nail polish. After the first coat dried, I applied a second coat. Once all dried, I used some well-worn 30um lapping film to remove the excess nail polish from the spine, leaving the engraving painted. All worked beautifully.

I'll post a close-up photo tomorrow.
 
Today I bought some black nail polish and applied it to the spine engraving (not etching) on one of my M7DS SR's. I used the brush that came with the nail polish. After the first coat dried, I applied a second coat. Once all dried, I used some well-worn 30um lapping film to remove the excess nail polish from the spine, leaving the engraving painted. All worked beautifully.

I'll post a close-up photo tomorrow.
Cant wait time see!
 
The engraving on my Japanese "Wednesday" SR was missing some paint in a few places. First I cleaned the engraving with acetone and cotton wool. This is what I was left with.
Engraving 01.JPG
I then allowed all of the acetone to evaperate and applied two coats on black nail polish.
Engraving 02.JPG
I gave the nail polish a good 30 minutes to dry to its maximum hardness.Then using a strip of well worn 30um lapping film, I rubbed the excess nail polish off. This left me with the finished job.
Engraving 03.JPG
Eacg charater is about 2.5mm (about 0.1") high. Remember that this engraving was done by hand and my engraver is only fluent in English and Chinese fonts, so it is not perfect. I think that he did a pretty good job. I guess that it was worth it at about USD 7 per SR.
 
The engraving on my Japanese "Wednesday" SR was missing some paint in a few places. First I cleaned the engraving with acetone and cotton wool. This is what I was left with.
I then allowed all of the acetone to evaperate and applied two coats on black nail polish.
I gave the nail polish a good 30 minutes to dry to its maximum hardness.Then using a strip of well worn 30um lapping film, I rubbed the excess nail polish off. This left me with the finished job.
Eacg charater is about 2.5mm (about 0.1") high. Remember that this engraving was done by hand and my engraver is only fluent in English and Chinese fonts, so it is not perfect. I think that he did a pretty good job. I guess that it was worth it at about USD 7 per SR.
It’s beautiful, dare I say perfect
 
I use paint filler pens that I picked up some years back for golf irons. The ones I have are Markal Proline & work great on Gillette Adjustables using a technique very similar to the OP's grandma, save that I just wipe off the overage with a wet thumb .. the pens are easier to use for me than a paintbrush
 
I use paint filler pens that I picked up some years back for golf irons. The ones I have are Markal Proline & work great on Gillette Adjustables using a technique very similar to the OP's grandma, save that I just wipe off the overage with a wet thumb .. the pens are easier to use for me than a paintbrush
Thanks for the tip. I might pick one up from the pro shop when next near Mactan Golf Club.
 

Ice-Man

Moderator Emeritus
I use Humbrol enamel that you can get from any craft shop or model makers, with it being enamel it's pretty tough and hard-wearing once set.

To apply I use a very fine artist brush and let it run into the grove, as said above in the first post but I don't use a paper towel but a sheet of paper. That way it won't go into the grove and remove the paint only what is outside.
 
I use Humbrol enamel that you can get from any craft shop or model makers, with it being enamel it's pretty tough and hard-wearing once set.

To apply I use a very fine artist brush and let it run into the grove, as said above in the first post but I don't use a paper towel but a sheet of paper. That way it won't go into the grove and remove the paint only what is outside.
I also thought about that but the nearest craft/model shop for me is on another island. Our current quarantine restrictions won't allow me to travel there.
 
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