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Good old Toilet Paper

Got my lip pretty good today, and no amount of styptic pencil or match was sealing the wound. It must have been a deep slice because that feeling styptic gives you with that nice burn-feedback once it's doing the job was absent. All items would just get soaked with blood and do nothing to stop the bloodletting. So as a last ditch effort, I decided to go old-school by sticking a small wad of TP on it. Fixed in 5 minutes flat. TP for the win!
 
Got my lip pretty good today, and no amount of styptic pencil or match was sealing the wound. It must have been a deep slice because that feeling styptic gives you with that nice burn-feedback once it's doing the job was absent. All items would just get soaked with blood and do nothing to stop the bloodletting. So as a last ditch effort, I decided to go old-school by sticking a small wad of TP on it. Fixed in 5 minutes flat. TP for the win!
The question has always been: to wet the tissue first, or to put it on dry? Pretty sure this question was even discussed in the movie "Oh God," in which God himself said, if I recall correctly, that you should put it on dry. But I always put it on there wet.

Haven't used it in years, though.
 
The question has always been: to wet the tissue first, or to put it on dry? Pretty sure this question was even discussed in the movie "Oh God," in which God himself said, if I recall correctly, that you should put it on dry. But I always put it on there wet.

Haven't used it in years, though.
I never wet the TP before applying it, never knew people did that!
 
Yes, TP works, but only if you apply pressure to the wound. In first aid classes, the first thing they teach you is to apply pressure to a wound to stem the flow of blood and facilitate clotting. I take low dose aspirin daily as a blood thinner, so I do bleed rather profusely if cut. Fortunately, I rarely cut myself shaving, but it has happened.

I also keep some Wound Seal powder in my first aid kit in case I get a serious cut. This is similar to the stuff the paramedics use to treat gunshot wounds. just in larger quantities.

 
Yes, TP works, but only if you apply pressure to the wound. In first aid classes, the first thing they teach you is to apply pressure to a wound to stem the flow of blood and facilitate clotting. I take low dose aspirin daily as a blood thinner, so I do bleed rather profusely if cut. Fortunately, I rarely cut myself shaving, but it has happened.

I also keep some Wound Seal powder in my first aid kit in case I get a serious cut. This is similar to the stuff the paramedics use to treat gunshot wounds. just in larger quantities.

So you keep the stuff in larger quantities than paramedics. :001_rolle
 
So you keep the stuff in larger quantities than paramedics. :001_rolle
The tubes I keep are the right size to treat a knife cut on your finger (something my wife does from time to time in the kitchen) or a small shaving cut. I would hope the paramedics carry something much larger in a trauma kit.
 
You know, BudgetShaverGuy, your text will stimulate a discussion of different brands of toilet paper, multi-ply v single, domestic or imported, wet v dry, vintage v new, then the experimenters will chime in, frankenpaper will follow, the thread will never end.......
 
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