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Going to try this again

I made a half hearted attempt at using a SR about a year ago. I want overly impressed, but I also don't think I started out right either. I was using a cheap synthetic "beginner's" strop. I recently bought an Illinois #127 striop (better than what I had, but cheap enough I won't be upset if I mess it up). Any pointer or tips (essentially for a newbee). What is the second white thing? I assume linen (though seems pretty stiff). How do I use that? Any tips, suggestions, rituals (I'll take care of sacrificing my self, hahaha) are appreciated.

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The white part, do about 20 strokes on it before going to the leather part. It helps align the blade and any micro chips get knocked off before you go to the leather so it doesn't embed in the leather. Then do about 40 to 50 strokes on the leather and you should be good to go. I tend to warm the leather up with rubbing my palm a few times up and down it before I use it. It helps condition the leather and softens it a bit before you use it. I started with an 827 Illinois strop....I now have 2 vintage Illinois strops and a Koken Scotch Shell strop. Just take your time and go slow until you get used to it to avoid ruining an edge or cutting your strop and keep light pressure. Stropping on leather and linen is the same process going back and forth so its pretty simple.

Larry
 
This may be an odd question, but is the rough backside of the leather ever used?
No, only the upside is used....back side is too rough and not finished on the leather portion....the linen you could use the back side for a CrOx paste, but I tend to keep pastes away from my strops to keep contamination to zero. I only use paddle strops for paste.
 

Tony Miller

Vendor
Actually, the Illinois 827 Russian strop is the backside of the leather and has a completely different feel than say the 127. Much more friction in use (heavy draw) and the grain side (the skin) has been embossed with deep ridges which compresses the leather making for a more dense temper (softness/hardness) but also seems to increase flexibility.
 
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Actually, the Illinois companion to this, the 827 Russian strop is the backside of the leather and has a completely different feel. Much more friction in use (heavy draw) and the grain side (the skin) has been embossed with deep ridges which compresses the leather making for a more dense temper (softness/hardness) but also seems to increase flexibility.
Trust Tony, he knows his strops. I have been battling with my Koken Scotch Shell. Had to do a clean with saddle soap, and perform several treatments of leather conditioner. After two weeks I believe I finally got it just right.

Larry

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Those are beauties Larry. Very nice finds
It was a right place, right time kind of find. It was never used, looked like it was a display piece when it arrived. It was dry and stiff, now it at least flexible and feels like it has some life back in it. I havent used the strop hone and dont know when i should use it. For now I keep my 827 Illinois or my vintage illinois strop nearby to use the linen before I use the leather side. Any tips on the hone strop (blue side) is appreciated.

Larry
 
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