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Glue bumps are hard!

I think this will be both first and last time that I try and change the knot in a handle that is epoxied in. I have a nice jungle acrylic handle that I stopped using because I did not like the knot. I got a different knot and proceeded to try drill the old knot out. I was able to drill out the center of the glue bump with a spade bit, but trying to get the remaining glue bump out with a rotary tool has been impossible and I've already damaged the rim of the handle quite a bit. I'd still use it if I could figure out how to cut the rest of that glue out. Anyone use a dremel for this and can tell me what kind of bit to get? Any help is appreciated. Resizer_16009133060970.jpg
 
I recently removed my first knots from a few handles. I found the steaming process to work fairly well. I was able to pull 3 knots out with my bare hand and a oven mitt holding the handle. There was one that had an epoxy or plaster like mix that was hard to remove and I found dipping this in boiling water for 30 seconds was good to soften the material enough to pry/scrape out the remaining residue.

my be a bit of a lost cause on the current brush but might be a worthwhile approach in future attempts.
 
Hadn't thought of using steam. Thanks that's helpful. Always glad to learn even if it's for next time. With steaming, do you leave the knot whole and try pull the glue bump out by pulling on the bulb of the knot?
 
I placed the brush in the bottom of mid sized mason jar and set in 2-3 inches of boiling water with a lid on it. After 30 minutes of simmering, I found it best to just turn the heat off and let sit for another 30. This helped make sure the heat was even in the existing glue. This allowed knots to be pulled out as whole, where the first knot I removed the brush had situated against the wall of the jar and the heat was not even, resulting in the knot coming out in two halves. I had some minor hopes or being able to repurpose the knots, but the only survivors in my case are ones I don’t care to transplant.
 
My concerns with steam are that (a) some glues won’t release in steam, and (b) some handle materials can start to melt. Have experienced both issues with various brushes. If you have the rotary tool already, get some grinding stones and grind the knot out. There are both AlO and SiC stones available. They’ll take care of business.

Once you have the center of the knot cored out, you can use a sanding drum to clean up the inside of the hole and enlarge it if needed. Use masking tape around the rim to prevent damage.
 
My concerns with steam are that (a) some glues won’t release in steam, and (b) some handle materials can start to melt. Have experienced both issues with various brushes. If you have the rotary tool already, get some grinding stones and grind the knot out. There are both AlO and SiC stones available. They’ll take care of business.

Once you have the center of the knot cored out, you can use a sanding drum to clean up the inside of the hole and enlarge it if needed. Use masking tape around the rim to prevent damage.
Thanks for the response. Very helpful. I see that Amazon sells small router bits for rotary tools. That should cut it! It's good to accumulate a variety of tools as sometimes you need them unexpectedly.
 
On the hand tool front, I have had good success with a sharp, U shaped hand carving gouge. With the center of the knot gone, you just cut your way out to the sides, nibble by nibble. It is slower and more controlled than power tools, far less likely to mar the handle.

A good one will cost some change, but a cheap set (Harbor Freight for example) is what you want for this kind of work. Plus you get a variety of sizes and shapes.
 
A round burr will take care of your problems...If you booger up the bottom of the hole you can level it up with some epoxy.
 
Finally got this glue bump out. Ordered some router bits for my rotary tool. The bit I was using had no blade, more of a sander (foreground in pic). The glue definitely requires a bit with a sharp cutting edge. Still did some damage to my acrylic handle, but I did reknot it anyways. Resizer_16010743896641.jpg
 
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