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Gifted a humidor

I was gifted this humidor from a buy nothing Facebook page. I’ve hit it with a couple coats of lemon oil, it’s starting to look good. Anyone have any info on it, or how I can replace the hygrometer on it if it’s bad? Which hygrometer would you recommend. I’ve got two boveda bags my uncle have me to see if it is bad. It’s gone from 40% to 50% overnight. Came with a bunch of cigars don’t think they are any good though

I’m an occasional cigar (2-4 a year) smoker this might turn it into a once a month thing, while I’m smoking meats. My wife isn’t the biggest fan of them.








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brandaves

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I leave it to those more knowledgeable on cigars and humidors to comment on best practices. I will say that it's a fine looking box and that Rocky Patel makes good sticks.
 
Toss the stogies, and get an accurate hydrometer inside the cabinet.

Before you put anything into it, you need to rehydrate the cabinet. If you don’t, your cigars become the humidifiers.

Put an open teacup of distilled water into it, and let it sit for at least several days, perhaps longer, until the internal RH is reading at least 72%. You want the lining and seals to take on that moisture. The cabinet may not hold a tight seal until that happens. Add water to the teacup should it evaporate off.

Once at 72% for a few days, you can remove the teacup, and begin stocking the cabinet, and installing a more permanent humidity source. I would start with a handful of cheaper sticks until the cabinet is stable. Keep the cabinet out of direct sunlight.

One other tip. On a smaller cabinet like this one, I would resist the urge to apply lemon and other powerful wood oils to the woodwork. You might accidentally wind up with a lemon scented cigar machine.
 
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Toss the stogies, and get an accurate hydrometer inside the cabinet.

Before you put anything into it, you need to rehydrate the cabinet. If you don’t, your cigars become the humidifiers.

Put an open teacup of distilled water into it, and let it sit for at least several days, perhaps longer, until the internal RH is reading at least 72%. You want the lining and seals to take on that moisture. The cabinet may not hold a tight seal until that happens. Add water to the teacup should it evaporate off.

Once at 72% for a few days, you can remove the teacup, and begin stocking the cabinet, and installing a more permanent humidity source. I would start with a handful of cheaper sticks until the cabinet is stable. Keep the cabinet out of direct sunlight.

One other tip. On a smaller cabinet like this one, I would resist the urge to apply lemon and other powerful wood oils to the woodwork. You might accidentally wind up with a lemon scented cigar machine.
Thanks! I’ll get some distilled water.

What would you recommend on the outside of the box? What hygrometer for inside would you recommend?


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Thanks! I’ll get some distilled water.

What would you recommend on the outside of the box? What hygrometer for inside would you recommend?


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Lately, I’ve been partial to the Govee units. They come in BT and Wi-fi versions, so you won’t even need to crack the lid open. They’re also as precise as the humidor specific models and use AAA batteries, not the overpriced button ones. Otherwise, the round ones from the cigar store will be fine.

You don’t have to be super precise; if it reads within 3 points of actual, that’s fine.

In a smaller cabinet that is bone dry, you want to get the humidor a little ‘wetter’ than your cigars. It’s easy enough to lower the RH later. The opposite situation is hard on the sticks.

I don’t recommend anything on the outside of a desktop sized humidor. They’re a fragile enough ecosystem as it is. Slathering chemicals on the outside of one is inviting trouble. Certainly nothing that can penetrate like an oil. Play it safe. Maybe a drop of hand soap and water if it’s really dirty. Perhaps a natural wax product if you’re into that sort of thing.

Good luck and welcome! It’s a good group here.
 
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