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French Press 101

There shouldn't be much harm in grinding a few days worth at a time should there? I am eagarly awaiting my new grinder so I don't have much experience. I wake up a half hour earlier than my lady and would hate to wake her up every morning.
Ground coffee begins oxidizing within 2 minutes. It's arguable "fresh" for 15 minutes (conventional wisdom, via "the rule of 15's" Fresh = 15 months for green, 15 days for roasted, 15 minutes for ground).

I lean toward 15 second for ground. Your goal should be to take your ground coffee straight from the grinder and into the brewing device and begin applying your bloom water immediately.
 
Ground coffee begins oxidizing within 2 minutes. It's arguable "fresh" for 15 minutes (conventional wisdom, via "the rule of 15's" Fresh = 15 months for green, 15 days for roasted, 15 minutes for ground).

I lean toward 15 second for ground. Your goal should be to take your ground coffee straight from the grinder and into the brewing device and begin applying your bloom water immediately.
I always tell people to buy whole beans, and grind just before using.
But I would stick with using fresh ground and brew a little extra amount each time to sacrifice to the bottom of the pot and bottom of your cup. To help keep a cleaner cup. You might have some extraction issues, hard for me to talk about that, but I would experiment with fresh ground beans to find something that works.
I am considering my question answered. Guess who is buying a grinder tonight? Thanks fellas!

There shouldn't be much harm in grinding a few days worth at a time should there? I am eagarly awaiting my new grinder so I don't have much experience. I wake up a half hour earlier than my lady and would hate to wake her up every morning.
Oh, and avsmusic1, I've been grinding a few days (actually weeks) at a time for a few months now and even in my ignorance was happy with the results. Its still way better than drip coffee. My wife had a roommate in college who woke her up with coffee grinding every morning and wanted to kill her, haha. As important as coffee is, you might want to find a middle road solution there, lol. But this is coming from a non-professional semi-aficionado so some guys here might disagree.:001_rolle
 
My wife had a roommate in college who woke her up with coffee grinding every morning and wanted to kill her, haha. As important as coffee is, you might want to find a middle road solution there, lol.
I've said it before, but will repeat myself: I'll pass out earplugs before I use pre-ground coffee.
Realistically, grinders aren't that loud from the next room. If noise is a paramount issue, manual grinders are rather quiet (no louder than brushing your teeth).
 
I've said it before, but will repeat myself: I'll pass out earplugs before I use pre-ground coffee.
Realistically, grinders aren't that loud from the next room. If noise is a paramount issue, manual grinders are rather quiet (no louder than brushing your teeth).
+1
 
Thank you guys for the insight. I will have to wait and see how loud the grinder is. She will be upstairs so it may not be an issue.
 
One more quick question, any thought on what coursness setting to start out with for a french press? I just bought a Baratza and I believe it has 40 different levels. I'm hoping it may come with a manual that may offer some advice but in case it doesn't I would like to make an educated guess...

Thanks again!
 
One more quick question, any thought on what coursness setting to start out with for a french press? I just bought a Baratza and I believe it has 40 different levels. I'm hoping it may come with a manual that may offer some advice but in case it doesn't I would like to make an educated guess...

Thanks again!
Every grinder is different. the number settings are relative to the grinder on your counter, and may not correlate very well with the same model from the same lot on someone else's counter.

That having been said, I like going for a drip grind (had any pre-ground coffee lately?) at 3:30 for FP, myself. The grind setting is based on personal preference more than anything else. Just make sure that the dwell time (how long you steep it) is adjusted to match. The finer the grind, the shorter the dwell time. The inverse is also true.
 
Been using French press exclusively for about 12 years or more. My only comment is that I would probably grind a bit coarser than you are showing on your grinder. Admittedly, grinding a bit finer does allow you to stretch your coffee farther, though you may end up with more sediment in your cup - which never bothers me. I also steap for 5 minutes before plunging, but that's personal preference.
 
One more quick question, any thought on what coursness setting to start out with for a french press? I just bought a Baratza and I believe it has 40 different levels. I'm hoping it may come with a manual that may offer some advice but in case it doesn't I would like to make an educated guess...

Thanks again!
I agree with the answers so far.. but then I roast my own coffee for freshness... its kinda like wet shaving.. there is always another razor, blade, cream/soap, etc to try and as my father would say 'the more you know, the more you know you don't know'..

I have a Baratza and I grind about 35 for French Press YMMV... I would start there and try a little courser and finer to see what you like (I really don't think any grinder will grind consistent enough to alleviate all the fines in the bottom of the pot).. also try more and less time (30 seconds either way) on your brew time.. water temp should be 195F to 205F, that's another variable some would say effects coffee flavor..

at some point you have to be a super taster to tell the difference but fresh roasted fresh ground coffee is like mamas cookies fresh from the oven verses store bought, IMHO..

the big thing I have found is water temp.. most retail coffee makers don't get the water hot enough your french press is getting water just off boil.. thats why I like my FP, pour overs, Clever Coffee Brewer, and vacpots over a normal coffee maker
 
My Baratza Virtuoso was set at close to 35 when I was brewing FP; I don't do that much anymore (because, whether or not it's totally true, I'm concerned about the LDL impact).
 
as in cholesterol? If so, I've never heard of a coffee and cholesterol corelation before... I will have to do a little research. Thanks again.
 
@Dinder1

I am Jerry and would like to try coffee for the first time instead of diet coke for my morning caffeine. I am looking for a simple, not too expensive way to drink good quality coffee instead of using pre ground coffee like Folgers my parents drink. It's too strong I think. What materials will I need and where is a good place to buy a French press? Coffee beans? Also if I buy a French press, can I use it for tea leaves as well?

Thank you so much!

Jerry
 
@Dinder1

I am Jerry and would like to try coffee for the first time instead of diet coke for my morning caffeine. I am looking for a simple, not too expensive way to drink good quality coffee instead of using pre ground coffee like Folgers my parents drink. It's too strong I think. What materials will I need and where is a good place to buy a French press? Coffee beans? Also if I buy a French press, can I use it for tea leaves as well?

Thank you so much!

Jerry
French press is available in a variety of stores, with some costing less than $20. They all produce similar results. Yes, you can use it for tea as well, and even for Yerbe Mate. Beans you might be able to source from a local roaster, or online, or even from a grocery store or coffee shop.
 
I have used this exact same method (minus the pre-soak) for the past 3-4 years with no need for adjustment. This will make boring everyday "run-of-the-mill" coffee taste great and make good coffee taste even better. The key is water temp and bean coarseness/ratio.
 
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