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Franken-Trafalgar, now my perfect brush!

I love the whole aesthetic of the Trafalgar brushes, they just look like the epitome of what a shave brush should be to me. But I couldn't get on with the knot on my T3. Just a little too short, no splay and stiff backbone. I face lather, so this caused me to not use it much. I ordered an APShaveCo 30mm SynBad, my favorite knot, and decided to try my hand at switching knots.

I steamed out the original knot, then used my Dremel to bore out the handle just a bit more to fit the larger knot. It was still a snug fit, so I was able to play with the loft a bit until it was just right, then used clear silicone to set it. I let it sit for a full 24 hours, and then used it this morning. I learned a few things for my next try, but overall I am extremely happy with it! Now I have one of my favorite handle designs, set with my favorite knot.
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t33.jpg
 
Great job! I’ve been wanting to do a transplant just like you. How did you “steam” out the old knot?
Thanks! I used a large pot that was tall enough for the brush to stand up in. I also used a silicone steamer basket turned upside down for the brush to stand on above the water, I learned this on a youtube video. Brought a small amount of water to boil, and let the brush steam for about 25 minutes with a lid on.

An important lesson was, use a neutral colored or white towel or pot holder to grip the brush when you take it out. The one I used was red, and it put a bit of pink stain on the handle as can be seen here:
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The steaming method will leave the handle discoloured, uniformly discoloured that is. I used it once, then placed the brush side by side with an original handle and the discoloration was evident.
I would never use this method of removing a knot.
 
Probably a good point. Since this handle is just sort of cream colored, I don't notice any change, but I might not try this on a more expensive brush.
 
Probably a good point. Since this handle is just sort of cream colored, I don't notice any change, but I might not try this on a more expensive brush.
Do you have another Trafalgar brush that you can put side by side with the steamed one?
Then you will see the change. I could be wrong since I have been wrong before. In my experience (of one victim, but still...) steaming is for other things and not for shaving brushes.
 
Anyway, enjoy your brush. It now has character, something, I for one, like very much.
It almost looks like Simpson's blush. Not being able to deliver a good knot.
 
Yeah I also have a T2, and the color still looks exactly the same. It could be because the handle is just sort of that natural cream color, but the T3 handle color was not affected, other than where I touched it with the red pot holder.
I think the knots that come in these are better than other more expensive Simpson synthetic knots. I just could not get a good face lather out of it, though the original knot was really good for a bowl lather.
 
Anyway, enjoy your brush. It now has character, something, I for one, like very much.
It almost looks like Simpson's blush. Not being able to deliver a good knot.
The steaming method will leave the handle discoloured, uniformly discoloured that is. I used it once, then placed the brush side by side with an original handle and the discoloration was evident.
I would never use this method of removing a knot.

What other method would you recommend for removing the knot on a Simpson Trafalgar. I am interested in trying tne same thing with my T2.
 
What other method would you recommend for removing the knot on a Simpson Trafalgar. I am interested in trying tne same thing with my T2.
Before I respond to your question let me say that I have very little experience with this. I have replaced 6 or 7 knots, once through the thermal method, and never again. The rest were done through the tried and tested elbow grease. Cut the hairs with scissors or snips, then use a combination of powered tools (variable speed drill with various attachments) to slowly remove the rest of the knot. I also used various hand tools to remove or loosen bits and pieces. It is a tedious process so if you don't have the patience don't start. This allowed me to satisfy my other hobby (I confess, I am a tool junkie as well...).
The final adjustment for the hole depth was done with a spade bit.

I enjoy the process.
 
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