What's new

Fixable? And with what damages?

I tried searching for the answer to this but to no avail!

Basically, I was wondering if this blade was beyond repair or somehow hampered by the excessive grinding/sanding it has been through. I hope not!

Main points of note are that the front edge is pretty heavily pivoted in due to sanding (about 1-2 mm maybe?) and that I feel that maybe the blade itself is too thin now? I have no frame of reference on this besides google searches on different grinds (not sure what it started as, but it looks like an extra full hollow now, ha).

So...whats the damage, my friends?

Thanks!
 

Attachments

  • $photo 1.jpg
    $photo 1.jpg
    38.5 KB · Views: 171
  • $photo 2.jpg
    $photo 2.jpg
    25.8 KB · Views: 170
  • $photo 3.jpg
    $photo 3.jpg
    41.1 KB · Views: 170
  • $photo 4.jpg
    $photo 4.jpg
    51.4 KB · Views: 170

Mike H

Instagram Famous
That blade looks fine to me as long as:
1- the spine is straight (not warped)
2- the blade did not get over heated (like too hot to touch) in the sanding /buffing that could affect the temper.
That blade still has a 100 years of service left.
 
FROM WHAT I CAN SEE, from your pics, I would say you have a blade worth honing, yeah. Get it honed and if the edge doesnt disintegrate after a few shaves, it is probably worth restoring if you are really feeling the love for that razor.
 
Thanks for the input thus far, guys!

Unfortunately, the blade isn't in any scales at the moment so I need to figure out the best way to move forward with this. As for earlier questions; the spine seems to be straight and there doesn't seem to be any issues with tempering that can be seen with the eye.

But yes, I really -do- feel the love for this razor, hence why I'm so concerned and looking to you all to help ease my stresses. Haha.
 
Can you highlight? Use ms paint or something .ike that to identify you concern areas. Most pitting seems far from the actual shaving edge.
 
Sorry for the delay, just managed to get all my razors back from my kit.

As discussed: $Pic 2.jpg$Pic1.jpg

In the first photo my main concern is the fact that, due to excessive hand sanding, there has been a little "divot" created. I'm hoping this can simply be ground down to be in line with the lower part with only a minimal loss of length. Am I correct on this?

The second photo outlines my fear about the razor blade itself being too thin. I've tried to do a search on this to see if it's possible, but not too much as come up. Is it possible that the blade was so sanded that it is too thin to hone/use? Every picture I've seen of extra full hollows looks like it has more "meat" than this, but again - looking to see if you all had an opinion on it.

Lastly, I was wondering how it actually works now that it has been sanded down and the visible hone wear has been rounded out. Is it just honed as per usual? Or will it require a special treatment?

As for the scales - I actually have it in mind to create a set of scales for this (and another razor I'm currently searching for) out of wood that came from one of our Regiment's broken chairs from WW1. I have someone who can do some engraving as well, so I'm hoping to have a good gift to give to one of our guys who is releasing this year after 35 years (!) of service. Until then, I suppose I'll have to pop them into some placeholder scales in order to see if it can be honed at all.

Oy. So complicated.

Thanks for the help, gentlemen!
 
That blade is fine, it is in no way too thin, here is a fili 14

the divot in the forn can be made straight rather easily or you can create a spanish point on it.
 
What he said.

Measure and calculate the bevel angle, and if it looks like it would come out under about 16.5 degrees, you could hone it with the spine taped at least while setting the preliminary bevel.
 
I have an idea of how to do this, I think. However, is there a specific walkthrough of how -exactly- to calculate the angle so I don't come back with an out-to-lunch answer? :001_smile

EDIT: Based on my handy ruler, I come back with Spine Thickness: 0.193 Inches and Blade Width: 0.85 Inches = Approximate Bevel Angle of 13.1 degrees. Or am I totally off base here?
 
Last edited:
I have an idea of how to do this, I think. However, is there a specific walkthrough of how -exactly- to calculate the angle so I don't come back with an out-to-lunch answer? :001_smile

EDIT: Based on my handy ruler, I come back with Spine Thickness: 0.193 Inches and Blade Width: 0.85 Inches = Approximate Bevel Angle of 13.1 degrees. Or am I totally off base here?
Your numbers are correct if measured correctly.
I would hone her with one layer of super 88, it is 8.8 mil thick, that should give you an angle of about 14.1 (similar to filarmonicas)
 
I have an idea of how to do this, I think. However, is there a specific walkthrough of how -exactly- to calculate the angle so I don't come back with an out-to-lunch answer? :001_smile

EDIT: Based on my handy ruler, I come back with Spine Thickness: 0.193 Inches and Blade Width: 0.85 Inches = Approximate Bevel Angle of 13.1 degrees. Or am I totally off base here?

Dont use actual blade width. Measure from the top edge of the spine's bevel to the razor's edge. That is your hypotenuse. Measure spine thickness and divide by 2. That is the opposite. Sine = oppposite / hypotenuse. Find the angle for the sine. Double it and that is your bevel angle. 13 degrees is a very acute bevel and it would not surprise me if it did not hold an edge or if it was a very harsh shave but of coursr YMMV. But if you used blade width as either the adjacent side or as the hypotenuse, the calculated angle would be considerably more acute than the actual angle.
 
With the amount of sanding that has been done, it's a bit difficult to determine exact spine bevel as it seems to go nearly to the same level (am I wrong?), but with changes - and until I get a caliper to get better measurements - it comes out to approximately between .193 and .200 thickness and .846 and .822 width for an angle of between 13.1 and 14.0 degrees.

With that said, is there a way that to permanently reset the bevel that would allow for a smoother 15-17 angle? What would you all do in this case?

Also, I must say, this thread has been extremely helpful for me and I really appreciate all of the responses from everyone so far!
 
Last edited:
Over several years tape can have a permanent effect, by allowing edge wear without allowing spine wear. Or when honing out a chip or a small frown.

For immediate permanent embiggenning of the bevel, hone away at the edge by either breadknifing or simply honing a lot, on a fast stone, with tape. You will have to refresh the tape often.

For making the bevel angle more acute, naturally you would hone the spine only, which you could do by taping the edge or making a shield for the edge from thin steel cut from a coffee can lid and folded. After, you would need to set the bevel again, of course.

Dont get medieval on it until you have proper measurements and determine that the shave suffers due to improper bevel angle. Some razors shave okay outside the normally accepted range.
 
Top Bottom