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First time roasting beans.

Just got in a few pounds of green coffee today. This is the very first time I’ve tried roasting my own beans. Didn’t buy a coffee roaster per say but an air popper. Went to the first crack and a bit beyond.

This bean is Papua New Guinea Nebilyer Valley Kuta from Burman’s.

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You made a smart choice with the popper, if you decide to spend a little more in the future Sweet Marias has one designed for roasting coffee with a lot of useful features. It's a good idea to find a colander or something similar to shake the chaff loose. I am sorry to say, but I was really excited about your first try! Maybe next time don't put them back in, but make two different roasts and taste them. You might decide to mix them or roast somewhere in between the following time. Keep track of, at least, your total time. Preferably the time after you hear the first pops, that is critical for repeatability. Total time will tell you if your batch size is too large and slowing things down, which will taste baked or even wooden.
 
You made a smart choice with the popper, if you decide to spend a little more in the future Sweet Marias has one designed for roasting coffee with a lot of useful features. It's a good idea to find a colander or something similar to shake the chaff loose. I am sorry to say, but I was really excited about your first try! Maybe next time don't put them back in, but make two different roasts and taste them. You might decide to mix them or roast somewhere in between the following time. Keep track of, at least, your total time. Preferably the time after you hear the first pops, that is critical for repeatability. Total time will tell you if your batch size is too large and slowing things down, which will taste baked or even wooden.

Thank you , that will be really helpful next time.
 
I know you didn't actually ask any questions, but if you do there are a hand full of people here that have been roasting longer than I have. There is a whole "library" section on Sweet Marias website and they have a lot of info on using air poppers. They also have green blends that are specifically designed for darker roasting.
 
I know you didn't actually ask any questions, but if you do there are a hand full of people here that have been roasting longer than I have. There is a whole "library" section on Sweet Marias website and they have a lot of info on using air poppers. They also have green blends that are specifically designed for darker roasting.
I saw they had some beans from Yemen. I just might try those next. Signed up for their newsletter too
 
Congrats on your new journey. I will recommend trying different roast levels. The first picture looked just fine to me, though I often roast to a medium / full city level, depending on the bean. I suggest trying the same beans at a light, medium (never have gotten the hang of city, ciyy +, full city, etc.), and dark roast. Then make a cup with each level roast to see what you prefer. Just like shaving, one's taste in coffee is very personal.
 
How important is the rest? And how long is recommended
More important for espresso, you can try brewing with it right away. The darker it is the less it matters, will go stale faster. Generally, 24-48 hrs. If you have something other than a automatic coffee machine to test, that would be better. I have had some volcanic incidents due to impatience.
 
Did a bit more today. This time it was Zambia Isanya Estate. Stopped at first crack this time which was around the 4:30 mark. Also used a colander to separate the chaff. This bean is recommended for a light to medium roast. I also tried the first batch this morning, couldn’t wait, and the taste was very pleasing
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The pandemic put a hole in my roasting activity, as my local supplier dried up and I really don't like ordering things through the post. Especially food items -- I'm picky and like to look them over first.

I've used a popper for years. I've also tended to stick pretty close to Sumatra, which I like very much, and to have a pretty repeatable roast. I take it through the first crack and let the second crack get rolling before quenching the coffee with a fan.

That gives me just enough Maillard reaction to colour the cup well and give a toasty taste, but preserves the clean tanginess of Sumatra which is the reason I like it.

O.H.
 
The pandemic put a hole in my roasting activity, as my local supplier dried up and I really don't like ordering things through the post. Especially food items -- I'm picky and like to look them over first.

I've used a popper for years. I've also tended to stick pretty close to Sumatra, which I like very much, and to have a pretty repeatable roast. I take it through the first crack and let the second crack get rolling before quenching the coffee with a fan.

That gives me just enough Maillard reaction to colour the cup well and give a toasty taste, but preserves the clean tanginess of Sumatra which is the reason I like it.

O.H.
If you like Sumatra, you will likely enjoy Bali Blue Moon. It is one of my favorites from the Indonesia region. I hope you find a new local supplier so you can once again enjoy roasting.
 
Dang, you have that figured out quick! That looks genuinely delicious. Have you figured out the time from first sound of pops to when you are pulling it? It should be around 1-1.25 minutes based on your previously posted time. If it tastes sweet, you probably nailed it. I am a little jealous as my machine is a bit of a hand full to manage.
 
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