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Filtering water with a pitcher

I have hard water, which I remedy through the use of a water softener. That makes our water great for showering, laundry, and drinking, though it doesn't remove dissolved minerals, and we get some lime deposits.

A good example:

In the winter, I supplement our heat with a wood stove. It's aesthetically pleasing and lowers our gas bill. I have a cast iron bowl that I fill with tap water and place atop our wood stove to add humidity. When the water evaporates it leaves a heavy white crust in the bottom of the bowl.

So, I want to use a pitcher to filter our drinking water, and the water I use to brew my coffee (and flush my fountain pens) rather than buying distilled or bottled water.

I know it has to do with the efficiency of the pitcher (filter) in removing Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) from the water, but can I get to the same level as distilled or bottled water using a regular Brita pitcher?
 
Distilled water has zero minerals and you will not get that with a water filter, but you will get clean tasting water with chlorine and other chemicals removed. Particulates will be removed.

What I'd suggest instead of a pitcher is a water dispenser. You fill the tank on top, water drips through a cartridge filter into the bottom section. Water can be drawn off from a small spigot. You can put the water dispenser on a shelf in the refrigerator and have a good source of water for drinking or other uses.

Most cartridges contain an activated carbon section and some sort of synthetic fiber filter section. Many filters have an ion exchange resin that can remove some heavy metals, but not calcium or magnesium ions that would be typical in hard water.
 
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Distilled water has zero minerals and you will not get that with a water filter, but you will get clean tasting water with chlorine and other chemicals removed. Particulates will be removed.

What I'd suggest instead of a pitcher is a water dispenser. You fill the tank on top, water drips through a cartridge filter into the bottom section. Water can be drawn off from a small spigot. You can put the water dispenser on a shelf in the refrigerator and have a good source of water for drinking or other uses.

Most cartridges contain an activated carbon section and some sort of synthetic fiber filter section. Many filters have an ion exchange resin that can remove some heavy metals, but not calcium or magnesium ions that would be typical in hard water.

Ok, I don't need the water refrigerated, just filtered, so what's the difference between the pitcher and water dispenser, which use the same filters?...and your saying that neither will remove calcium/lime scale?

Thanks. 🙂👍
 
Just for info, minerals may be bad for pots and fixtures, but people need them as part of our diet.
Humans don't do well living on distilled or reverse osmosis water.
Typical bottled water has minerals.

Thank you.

I don't mind drinking my well water, and do so all the time. I have always despised the thought of paying for water in a bottle.

My concern is merely mineral deposits inside my coffee pot/kettles/brewer's, especially the innards of our Keurig...and maybe I'm overreacting, but I don't want any mineral deposits left when flushing my fountain pens.

I'd rather just buy a filtered pitcher for those uses than pay for bottled water at the grocery...if indeed that is an effective means of removing some or most of the mineral content.
 
You might want to consider a filter that attaches to your faucet. I have had both a pitcher and the filter on the faucet. I preferred the filter on the faucet.
 
You might want to consider a filter that attaches to your faucet. I have had both a pitcher and the filter on the faucet. I preferred the filter on the faucet.

That won't work on our faucet. Ours has a pull-down sprayer that is part of the gooseneck.

I could get a filter under the sink, but my needs are very limited and a pitcher will suit me just fine.

I honestly appreciate all of the responses, but really, all I'm asking here is if the filtered pitcher is capable of reducing the mineral content of my water to a level comparable to bottled water.
 

Jay21

Collecting wife bonus parts
We have hard water and filter our drinking water in a Pur fridge pitcher with release lever for filling cups and bottles. It does not remove dissolved minerals. The water drops on the bottom shelf in the fridge from when I miss my bottle tell me all I need to know about that.
 
We have hard water and filter our drinking water in a Pur fridge pitcher with release lever for filling cups and bottles. It does not remove dissolved minerals. The water drops on the bottom shelf in the fridge from when I miss my bottle tell me all I need to know about that.

Ugh. Now, I'm wondering how a company like Zero (filters) can tout "zero TDS" if, infact, the filters do not remove dissolved mineral content. Buyer beware, I suppose...must be some fine print.

So, I guess my question now is:

Is there any inexpensive (not whole-house) filter that removes minerals present in well water?
 
Ok, I don't need the water refrigerated, just filtered, so what's the difference between the pitcher and water dispenser, which use the same filters?...and your saying that neither will remove calcium/lime scale?

Thanks. 🙂👍

The advantage to the dispenser is just that the pitchers are pretty small and it takes time to run water through the filter, so with the dispenser you have a larger reservoir filled in advance so less waiting around. The filters are usually the same.

Unfortunately, filters don't really remove the calcium and magnesium ions in hard water. Reverse osmosis filters will, but those are usually large, expensive systems that are made for the whole house.
 
You can get electric appliances that distill small amounts of water for household use. They are expensive, though, a few hundred dollars, IIRC.
 

Jay21

Collecting wife bonus parts
Ugh. Now, I'm wondering how a company like Zero (filters) can tout "zero TDS" if, infact, the filters do not remove dissolved mineral content. Buyer beware, I suppose...must be some fine print.

So, I guess my question now is:

Is there any inexpensive (not whole-house) filter that removes minerals present in well water?
The filters we use and the leftovers from a few years of drips.

IMG_0326.jpeg

IMG_0327.jpeg
 
Ugh. Now, I'm wondering how a company like Zero (filters) can tout "zero TDS" if, infact, the filters do not remove dissolved mineral content. Buyer beware, I suppose...must be some fine print.

So, I guess my question now is:

Is there any inexpensive (not whole-house) filter that removes minerals present in well water?
You don’t want zero. I used to have a salt water tank that used zero TDS water. It went through four filters. Great for fish, corrals, etc., but would upset my stomach if I were to drink it. You need some minerals in the water.

Seems like the pitcher is a good fit for you.
 
I pour a white vinegar and water solution through my drip machine about once or twice a year. Removes the mineral deposits left by my tap water.
 

luvmysuper

My elbows leak
Staff member
Distilled water tastes bad/flat because of the lack of minerals.
This can cause upset stomach in some.
Bottled water is typically filtered, then has calcium and magnesium added back in to improve taste.
Typical bottled water has the same calcium and magnesium levels as tap water.


I think your pitcher filter will serve just fine, though it likely won't remove much if any dissolved minerals.
 
Well, I'm certainly not going to fret over it. 🙂

I had assumed that a filtered pitcher would be a simple and inexpensive means to achieve what I wanted, but no big deal.

Thanks to all who responded.
 
I think it does make a difference - at least my Mavea system does (probably same thing as Britta).

My city water is already really good and fairly soft - but there is some hardness to it. I bought the aquarium test kit (drops that change color) and when I run my tap water thru the pitcher filter, it does reduce the hardness a little. So I always fill my mug with filtered pitcher water and warm it in the microwave and use the filtered water for my brush and lather - the difference is small but I think it's better using the filtered water.

I also use the filtered water for my espresso machine. I like to physically open the boiler when I'm cleaning/descaling - I'm a geek - I just prefer to open it and see for myself what salts/silt has collected in there. Anyway using the filtered water I hardly ever need to descale as there aren't many deposits when I check it.
 
Water out of a Zerowater pitcher measures exactly 0 TDS.

I used it in the past for my espresso machine (I just added potassium bicarbonate to avoid corrosion).
 
I pour a white vinegar and water solution through my drip machine about once or twice a year. Removes the mineral deposits left by my tap water.
This. Very hard city water where I live and it's just a fact of life. We bought Pur and other filters and nothing works. We clean our kettle every once in a while with white vinegar and rinse it with lots of water.

I bought a large bottle of distilled water for my fountain pens, my homemade pen wash, and spray bottle for shaving. I haven't had any issues.
 
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