What's new

Feeling the best a man could feel in one day from a good deed.

Both Robert and Jim are decent people and what we should all be about. The people you each wrote about appreciated being treated like adult men. What you both did is what life is all about: respect leading to helping toward restoring self-respect in the other person!
 
People with a military background have a special connection. We get each other and respect each other. There’s a shared mindset and comradery that sticks with you. I took part in Germany’s national service program and it was a great asset to me. Sadly the program has now ended. It’s a big loss for the country. Doing something for the greater good of the country, getting out of your comfort zone and gelling with people from other walks of life creates a strong bond between fellow citizens and the country as a whole. It’s a great start to adult life. We need more of this in the world not less of it.
 
A great story! It reminds me of when George Orwell talks about being incredibly poor in Down and Out in Paris and London. He is always searching for a new, sharp razor blade and that same kind of searching comes up in 1984. Shaving has a way to reaffirm your humanity in desperate times. Kudos for seeing this man as a person. We could all learn a lesson from it.
I read "1984" in 1974 in the Eighth Grade. "Down and Out..." was a more obscure work, but it was on MY late Father's bookshelf, so I read it years ago. Makes you think TWICE about eating in a Paris Cafe-LOL-but, hopefully the sanitation has improved.
 
Robert, you've always been a generous man. I'm glad you were able to provide some temporary relief to that gentleman, and I'm glad he was grateful. Sounds like it was a very good day for everybody.

I wasn't there, but I thank you :)
 

FarmerTan

"Just Call Me Billy"
Robert,

Thank you so much for sharing this story.

My very own brother was homeless for several months. He was much like many of us - industrious, college educated, from a good family - but suddenly found how fickle the fates can be. When I finally prevailed upon him to journey here and let me help him I was confronted with a man who looked like a street bum. He wouldn't let me hug him out of embarrassment about how he smelled. I took him home where he got his first shower in five months, got him shaved and into clean clothes, and made him a part of my family.

He cleaned up nicely I must say.

A few months later he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He was a part of our lives until his death about eighteen months after diagnosis. It was rough on us, and much rougher on him. We miss him. I suspect we got more out of the situation than my brother did. I am so thankful that he didn't have to go through it alone and on the street.

Very little separates us from many of the homeless. Thank you so much for your kindness and generosity towards the man you met.

Happy shaves,

Jim
You were blessed AND a blessing my friend.

None of us are all that far from homeless.
 
I just read this first time today. It's a great story of an experience that I know one of you will remember. That poor Vietnam vet may or may not still have his Rockwell knowing how tough of a life they have to endure.
It just seems that there are more and more homeless these days. Most of them have a story to tell that would break our hearts but for now they are on the other side of the road I live on and most of us share. It's a sad situation we can be thankful to not have to live with.
 

Messygoon

Abandoned By Gypsies.
Every once in a while, I re
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
Every so often, like this morning, I reread your post to life my spirits. Thank you Robert for the ongoing gift of love and inspiration. Your evening in Needles, California (truly hell on earth) made a lasting impression, and gives just a glimpse of heaven.
 
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
Just when I thought this story couldn't get any better, turns out you share your name with the baller from 'For Whom the Bell Tolls.' What a stud
 
Top Bottom