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Feeling the best a man could feel in one day from a good deed.

Chango

Contributor
That story should be a country music song.

really. Great story.
 
Thanks for posting this. We probably ask ourselves if we'd do the same in similar circumstances. I hope I would be as kind and compassionate as you were. God Bless you!
 

MrPeat

Contributor
Nice story...That man will never forget you. I would tell you my little story where a Professor saved my life after getting out after serving in a Recon Unit.

I have never forgot the man. Reason why I know that guy will never forget you. Kudos...👍👍👍
 
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
What a great and touching story. You brought tears to my eyes as I read. More of us should be kind and generous to those in need as you have. Definitely an example to follow.
 
I was moved to tears reading your story today. We do not get many stories of compassion these days. This is a wonderful example of careing for each other and disregarding outward appearances. Thank you, you have made my day!
 
Thank you so much for this story of caring and love. I read this to my family and everyone broke down crying. We are going to use this inspirational story to go out and do something good for someone, today.
God bless you,

Matt & Family
 

Bhugo

Contributor
Superb!
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
 
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
Thank you so much for sharing. It really touched my heart.

Are you a climber? The Needles and sleeping i
 
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
Thank you so much for sharing. It really touched my heart.

Are you a climber? The Needles and sleeping i
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
The only thing that would have made this better would be a couple photos. Great story.
 
Hello all,

Recently I was staying in my vehicle on a road trip from back home. My father has recently passed away and I drove out to be there for his wife and for the arrangements. While "truck camping" in Needles, CA I was shaving one evening and was approached by a homeless gentleman wearing a 1st Cavalry hat. At first he asked if I could help him with any change for food. I handed him a $20 bill and told him that I was going to be cooking soon and he was more than welcome to join me for a hot meal to which he happily accepted. I cooked this gentleman a New York strip steak on my hibachi and served him his steak with a side of sauteed mushrooms and green beans. This man broke down into tears in front of me which with all I had going on caused me to break down myself. We then spent the next five or so hours chatting near the fire pit I had made. He had made mention of his time in the Vietnam conflict and how it was hard for him to adjust after returning home. I shared with him my story of my time in the Army and we laughed, cussed and reminisced of time gone past. He then started inquiring about seeing me wet shaving while camping. He said how he figured it would have been easier to just use a modern razor or an electric one. I explained to him my fascination and obsession with practicing the old ways of shaving and he smiled and said how glad he was that people still remember things from his past era. The man had looked like he hadn't shaved in months and I asked him if he would like to try it out and he was so happy to give it a try he nearly could not stop smiling. Now, I have seen many people wet shave over the years but this man took my brush, soap and bowl and whipped up a lather that would make soap manufacturers gasp in awe. He then proceeded to stretch and pull his face and glide my Rockwell over his face. This man transformed in front of my eyes and I could see the old soldier come out within him as he gussied himself up. After he rinsed and pat his face dry he hugged me and said it had been many years since someone had even taken the time to have a conversation with him and even longer since someone had expressed even the slightest of a care towards him. We cracked a beer, said a toast and drank one under the stars. Afterwards he told me he had best be on his way as he was unsure where his feet would take him through the night but he wanted to get a good start. Before he left I emptied out my dopp kit and placed my Rockwell, Brush, bowl, Soap and aftershave in it along with several packs of blades and gave it to him as a parting gift. He proceeded to break down again and wrapped his arms around me in a thankful embrace before shaking my hand and saying "God bless you soldier!". I literally watched this man walk off through the brush with tears in my eyes of both happiness and sadness. Knowing now what this man had been through, how he came to be in the situation he is in and knowing I made a good memory for him even if it may be his last great one. However I hold in my heart that I am certain everytime he uses that razor he will likely remember the guy he met in the hell of California known as Needles.

I know this is long but after having been off the forum for a while with all that has happened I thought I should share this as he has been on my mind a lot lately. There is far too little good in this world anymore and I hope that this experience I had and have shared with you will hopefully touch someone else's heart and encourage them to do something great for someone no matter how big or small. Just know that it will be appreciated.

Robert Jordan
A Co. 2nd Batt. 81st Armor, 4th Platoon
You did a good thing! I'm proud of you.
 
We did something similar to this a while back that I forgot about until I read this post.

We were on Pacific Beach having a great time. It was my family, my friend Rick's family and another family we met there. We were hanging out and enjoying each other's company during a long weekend. We had watched football in the bar earlier in the day and decided to do a campfire on the beach that night with the kids and the wives. We got the marshmallows for the kids from a nearby grocery store, the gram crackers, chocolate, the works. It was dark out and we got the fire going. A really beautiful night, hearing the waves crash and surrounded by some old as well as some new friends. The wives had some wine and we were planning on having a beer or two. Not a lot or drinking as we were mostly there for the kids. Walking distance from our hotel. The kids were having a great time. Really, really nice evening so far.

I ordered some pizza that the wife and I walked over and picked it up to bring it back to the campfire. So we get there with the pizza and there's this homeless guy about twenty to thirty feet away. He's maybe in his late twenties. We call to him to come over and have some pizza with us, have a beer or soda if he'd like and enjoy the campfire. I thought it was a nice gesture and he seemed grateful. He sits down and enjoys some pizza and a soda. Seems nice enough and all and things are going well. He finished eating his pizza before sharing some inappropriate comments about what he'd like to do to my buddie's wife in front of him and the kids. My buddy tells him to watch it and he then stood up in a Karate Kid stance and told us he was a Ninja. Myself and my buddy had had some martial arts training so we asked him who he trained under and he said "Master Myagi". He got quite abrasive and tried to start a fight with us. This was a fight that he had zero chance of winning against my buddy alone and certainly not against three grown men. My buddy was mad enough to kick the hell out of him but he resisted as we held them both back. To say he was upset would have been a huge understatement. We told the guy to leave at that point or he was going to get the beating of his life. He stalled a bit, shared some more inappropriate comments about some of the wives, and then finally left.

No cool war stories or shaving sessions with this one, just a bit of the mental illness that probably put him on the streets in the first place. Oh well, he did enjoy the pizza and we got a good story out of the deal. It won't stop us from doing other kind deeds going forward though we might be a little more cautious to avoid conflicts with ninjas.
 
We did something similar to this a while back that I forgot about until I read this post.

We were on Pacific Beach having a great time. It was my family, my friend Rick's family and another family we met there. We were hanging out and enjoying each other's company during a long weekend. We had watched football in the bar earlier in the day and decided to do a campfire on the beach that night with the kids and the wives. We got the marshmallows for the kids from a nearby grocery store, the gram crackers, chocolate, the works. It was dark out and we got the fire going. A really beautiful night, hearing the waves crash and surrounded by some old as well as some new friends. The wives had some wine and we were planning on having a beer or two. Not a lot or drinking as we were mostly there for the kids. Walking distance from our hotel. The kids were having a great time. Really, really nice evening so far.

I ordered some pizza that the wife and I walked over and picked it up to bring it back to the campfire. So we get there with the pizza and there's this homeless guy about twenty to thirty feet away. He's maybe in his late twenties. We call to him to come over and have some pizza with us, have a beer or soda if he'd like and enjoy the campfire. I thought it was a nice gesture and he seemed grateful. He sits down and enjoys some pizza and a soda. Seems nice enough and all and things are going well. He finished eating his pizza before sharing some inappropriate comments about what he'd like to do to my buddie's wife in front of him and the kids. My buddy tells him to watch it and he then stood up in a Karate Kid stance and told us he was a Ninja. Myself and my buddy had had some martial arts training so we asked him who he trained under and he said "Master Myagi". He got quite abrasive and tried to start a fight with us. This was a fight that he had zero chance of winning against my buddy alone and certainly not against three grown men. My buddy was mad enough to kick the hell out of him but he resisted as we held them both back. To say he was upset would have been a huge understatement. We told the guy to leave at that point or he was going to get the beating of his life. He stalled a bit, shared some more inappropriate comments about some of the wives, and then finally left.

No cool war stories or shaving sessions with this one, just a bit of the mental illness that probably put him on the streets in the first place. Oh well, he did enjoy the pizza and we got a good story out of the deal. It won't stop us from doing other kind deeds going forward though we might be a little more cautious to avoid conflicts with ninjas.
I do not have exactly the same story with homeless people as the one told here, but I did have some experiences of the sort - homeless being treated well and responding aggressively; homeless people have mental problems (they would not be homeless if they were mentally sound), so do not expect reactions to goodness as it would be the case of mentally stable individuals.

However, one can still be a good person to them. Asking for directions is one. Regardless of the quality of the indications, you usually get a big big smile from them, if they are, to some extent, responsive.

As to the thread, I am a high school teacher. So I would say dealing with difficult students and being an active part of their successes, regardless of how small they are.
 
I do not have exactly the same story with homeless people as the one told here, but I did have some experiences of the sort - homeless being treated well and responding aggressively; homeless people have mental problems (they would not be homeless if they were mentally sound), so do not expect reactions to goodness as it would be the case of mentally stable individuals.

However, one can still be a good person to them. Asking for directions is one. Regardless of the quality of the indications, you usually get a big big smile from them, if they are, to some extent, responsive.

As to the thread, I am a high school teacher. So I would say dealing with difficult students and being an active part of their successes, regardless of how small they are.
There were definitely some indications that maybe he was off whatever medication he was supposed to be on, either that or unsuccessfully self medicating, or both. I'm totally fine with crazy as, God knows, we all have a bit of that in our families. The aggressiveness and disrespectful behavior toward someone that is trying to help you, not so much. Kinda like dealing with drunk people, the happy drunk is tolerable while the mean drunk not so much.

I've had good and bad experiences with homeless people. Most are very kind and appreciative.
 
We had a local homeless guy who was so abrasive that people made up t-shirts that read "William Morva is an a**hole".
We were having a church men's breakfast and I spotted him fishing butts out of the ashcan so I invited him to breakfast. He was quiet but seemed to enjoy the company. He borrowed $5 off me to get some cigarettes.

He has since been executed by the state so I doubt I get my $5.
 
I retired from construction and I had a British soldier friend my fathers age. They were both WW II vets. The Brit was in north France, farther south than most and had the German army between his outfit and Dunkirk. So they hightailed it down to Marsailles.
He got back to Britain and he was put in a ranger unit. He killed a few Germans, one an arms length away. At the almost end he was a leutenant leading a small group in Germany. Ran into bunch of Hitler Youth, jut kids. Several of his troops were bitter killers who wanted to kill them all. He stopped that and through an interpreter was able to get them to surrender. They turned back into boys and wanted something to eat. Tommy said, "well... I hoped that God would forgive him for the men he killed by saving their lives." He passed about 10 years ago. Regards, Guillermo
 
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