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Feather Artist Club Shaving Angle

Hi all,

With DE shaving, the textbook (and Geo Fatboy) says you start with the razor handle parallel to the face (with the blade almost perpendicular to the skin) and then slightly tilt it up until it catches. The tilt angle plus the curvature of the razor's bottom plate make up the angle of the shave.
With a straight razor/shavette I understand you basically start the opposite way. The blade is virtually parallel to the skin and the razor is slightly tilted to make up the shave angle.
In the case of the Feather Artist Club blade in a single edge safety razor (like the Razorock Hawk) or in a Feather shavette, what is +- the difference in angle of the blade compared to the face? I would assume the angle is less with the shavette? What is the range of angles were a razor blade cuts and were you actually start scraping?

Thanks!
 
It depends on the shavette, a little. The Feather SS has a ridge that requires a more obtuse angle. Otherwise, just lay the thing flat against your face and rotate it out just enough for the blade to make contact. The way some shavettes are designed, this angle will have the holder close enough to the skin that it will want to stick a little when it's wet.

The blade will shave, of course, at many angles. The higher the angle the more it will want to exfoliate aggressively. I think the natural inclination for a beginner is to err towards more obtuse, because you can feel the blade more. Fight this urge. If you're too flat you can always do another stroke at a better angle. Also, generally, the sharper the blade, the lower the angle that you can and should use. As a blade dulls you have to use a higher angle to cut effectively.

As far as putting numbers to those angles, not sure. Try it and you'll figure it out quickly.
 
I use an Artist Club DX and I start with the blade holder flat against my skin and then just barely lift it away, no more than one spine width. The exact angle will depend in part to the particular blade you are using. e.g. the Feather Professional are 8mm and the Feather Super are 8.2mm and thus offer greater exposure.
 
Also, I admit to being only marginally aware of what a Geo Fatboy is, but I wouldn't emulate the shaving angles he uses with open blade razors.
I concur with all your comments Darth. Regarding Geo Fatboy, I enjoy following him pretty much on a daily basis and have ordered from him regularly. But he does indeed have a heavy beard that his often used >30% angles seem to mow down. I swear I see him using 45 degrees a lot!!
Love the guy however.😊👍
 
I concur with all your comments Darth. Regarding Geo Fatboy, I enjoy following him pretty much on a daily basis and have ordered from him regularly. But he does indeed have a heavy beard that his often used >30% angles seem to mow down. I swear I see him using 45 degrees a lot!!
Love the guy however.😊👍
I only watched a few videos. His shavette angles are a little high but not bad. I'd say he needs a better edge on his straights though.
 
I have watched Geo Fatboy shave a few times, I think they were recordings that would be 10 years old or more by now, so his technique may have evolved over time. That said for context for my comment, I thought he was shaving at a high angle, overly steep that risked skin irritation and shorter blade life. That an inexperienced shaver trying to learn should not copy him directly but try to shave at a much shallower angle. I think the higher angle he was using mostly showed off his skill, especially his control of pressure. When using very light touch the exact angle is not as critical, but it takes many shaves along with receiving nicks and cuts to learn.
 
Still like/respect him over any of the usual youtubers. He could just try to sell his products, but instead he seems genuinely interested in educating. Really enjoyed the video of his personal SR collection.
 
Also, I admit to being only marginally aware of what a Geo Fatboy is, but I wouldn't emulate the shaving angles he uses with open blade razors.

I for once don‘t pay much attention as to what Geo Fatboy says these days after he tried to convince the public that Dovos leave the factory shave-ready, based on his single pass shave demonstration and what a Dovo rep told him.
It might be shave-ready for his standards, but not necessarily shave-ready for mine…


Regarding Feather AC blades in general, new blades are quite (frustratingly) aggressive until the 2nd to 3rd shave. Palm stropping does, however, help.

As a rule of thumb, an angle where the spine is lifted is about 1 - 1½ spine thickness above the skin seems about right for a Feather AC. Deviating too much either way may have a new blade dig into your skin. Stretching the skin is imperative as well, you don’t want to give a new blade the chance to bite you.

Do bear with me though, I have different Feather AC models, shaving with them has become kind of intuitive to me and I don’t think about it much longer. But as I said, the first shaves are the worst, so perseverance is the key.

I only use Professional and Super Professional blades and the difference is not really that big.
The idea of stringing a wire in front of a blade Pro-Guard style never appealed to me, so these are the only AC blades I ever cared to try.

I own Feather AC SS and DX razors and, with the exception of the Scotchwood SS, I clearly prefer the DX versions. The standard Feather SS with the plastic scales is the one I like the least.


Hope this helps…


B.
 
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Hi all,

With DE shaving, the textbook (and Geo Fatboy) says you start with the razor handle parallel to the face (with the blade almost perpendicular to the skin) and then slightly tilt it up until it catches. The tilt angle plus the curvature of the razor's bottom plate make up the angle of the shave.
With a straight razor/shavette I understand you basically start the opposite way. The blade is virtually parallel to the skin and the razor is slightly tilted to make up the shave angle.
In the case of the Feather Artist Club blade in a single edge safety razor (like the Razorock Hawk) or in a Feather shavette, what is +- the difference in angle of the blade compared to the face? I would assume the angle is less with the shavette? What is the range of angles were a razor blade cuts and were you actually start scraping?

Thanks!
With my CJB Kamasori, it’s basically like a wedge so you can put it flat on your face…. Or lift it up very little . I don’t think I like the professional blades I’m going to try the supers next time maybe there won’t tugging with them
 
Have any of you, who are now using a Feather Shavette, ever used a single edge safety razor with a similar Feather blade? Besides the completely different experience and technique, was there a noticeable difference in shave quality?

I used a barely used Razorock Hawk V2 today with a Feather Professional Super blade. It performed poorly under the jawline and I had to do a third pass with my trusty Fatip OC to get the result I normally come to expect from a shave.
 
I for once don‘t pay much attention as to what Geo Fatboy says these days after he tried to convince the public that Dovos leave the factory shave-ready, based on his single pass shave demonstration and what a Dovo rep told him.
It might be shave-ready for his standards, but not necessarily shave-ready for mine…


Regarding Feather AC blades in general, new blades are quite (frustratingly) aggressive until the 2nd to 3rd shave. Palm stropping does, however, help.

As a rule of thumb, an angle where the spine is lifted is about 1 - 1½ spine thickness above the skin seems about right for a Feather AC. Deviating too much either way may have a new blade dig into your skin. Stretching the skin is imperative as well, you don’t want to give a new blade the chance to bite you.

Do bear with me though, I have different Feather AC models, shaving with them has become kind of intuitive to me and I don’t think about it much longer. But as I said, the first shaves are the worst, so perseverance is the key.

I only use Professional and Super Professional blades and the difference is not really that big.
The idea of stringing a wire in front of a blade Pro-Guard style never appealed to me, so these are the only AC blades I ever cared to try.

I own Feather AC SS and DX razors and, with the exception of the Scotchwood SS, I clearly prefer the DX versions. The standard Feather SS with the plastic scales is the one I like the least.


Hope this helps…


B.
Geo has a face for shaving no doubt….He can shave with everything from a pocket knife to a butter knife. I like him and support him as well. With that said, Yes, his shave ready may not be mine.
 
Have any of you, who are now using a Feather Shavette, ever used a single edge safety razor with a similar Feather blade? Besides the completely different experience and technique, was there a noticeable difference in shave quality?

I used a barely used Razorock Hawk V2 today with a Feather Professional Super blade. It performed poorly under the jawline and I had to do a third pass with my trusty Fatip OC to get the result I normally come to expect from a shave.
I started with a Hawk V2 and now have the Colonial General. I never got along with the Hawk and gave up trying to figure out why. The best results are with a Proline blade, but it is not the sharpest. It's just the limits of the razor itself. The thing to remember about most AC safety razors is they hold the blade at approximately 30, closer to a DE razor than anything else. This will result in a higher shaving angle than anybody sane uses with a shavette or straight razor, something above 35 degrees due to the curvature of the top cap. Now that I think about it, that may be why the Hawk is so inefficient, it might be holding the blade at a lower angle. I have heard that the stainless V3 is excellent, but I don't have any experience.

I have always had problems getting hairs under the jawline and repeatedly trying eventually leads to skin irritation. What works best is pull the skin from lower cheek level upward as far as can and maybe even tilting your head to the opposite side of the one you are shaving. This brings the jaw hairs up and creates a flat runway from just below your ear to the hairless part of your neck that can be shaved all at once. You may need to shave at anywhere from straight back just below ear level to about 45 degrees forward depending on hair growth patterns. You can also do something similar if you are comfortable shaving upwards toward your jaw by pulling your neck skin down and back. I usually have to do both methods described. The Fatip might be working because of the OC is allowing the blade to get closer to your skin which puts you in greater danger of getting bit.
 
With Feather shavette and Feather blades, I've learned to ignore all videos and simply shave.
Shallow angles, light touch; blades are so amazingly sharp and smooth.
My favs are Proguards and Softguards.
Overall, these are pinnacle of shave technology, IMHO!

Truefitt and Hill Grafton Feather Rudy vey march 28 2022.jpg
 
I started using a Feather SS a few years ago, and initially got great shaves from it, but it took me a while to figure out why I could only get about 8 shaves from a blade.

Turns out I used too much angle with it. The lip sort of encourages you to raise the spine.

Rightly or wrongly I now hold it almost flat on my face with a bit of pressure on the side of the razor. I think that was what the lip was designed to do, the sideways pressure makes the skin stretch around the lip. Works better for me and I can get around 15-20 shaves from a blade.

To be honest I get better shaves from my straights these days, but the Feather is handy for travelling, especially if you are traveling to countries that things go missing from checked in luggage, like South Africa.
 
I agree that newbies should not emulate GeoFatboy's shaving angles, whether with DE or with straights/shavettes.

I have four AC shavettes, and the angles are slightly different for all of them. Go with the shallowest possible angle that still cuts hairs. Like others have said, you can always go back over an area again if your angle was too shallow to give you a really close shave. Beats using a styptic on all the bleeders you got doing it the other way.

I prefer Kai Mild PINK blades and Schick Proline blades to any blade that Feather puts out in the AC format. For me, both the Kai and the Schick are smoother and feel better on the face than any of the Feather-branded blades.
 
I have used Feather shavettes for years now and I have recently increased my angle slightly to around 15 degrees. This seems to work a little better on my very tough beard.
 
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