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Electronic Sight for Pistols

Recently I received an email from Crimson Trace in which they indicated they would be introducing an optical sight for pistols.

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The cost is on the rather high side: $400.

Recently while at a shooting range I saw one individual shooting a Glock 17. He had the sight below attached to the G17.


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I spoke to the shooter and asked him about the sight he was using. He said it has helped him because normally he wears eyeglasses and the sight has enabled him to see the target better.

Wondering if any of you guys have put such sights on your pistols.
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Not yet, but heading that way ultimately. I can see front sight, rear and target - just not all at once. :001_unsur Choosing which to not see, stinks.

This week's Firearms News is all about dots and optics.


AA
 
My EDC, a S&W 9mm C.O.R.E. Sports a Trijicon RMR-07. I love it since I wear progressive lenses and can. I longer rapidly focus on the front sight.

I do need to get tritium irons for it, because columnating off hand in the dark is a challenge without seeing the irons.


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I have Burris Fast Fire III's on handguns. I can say nothing but good things about them. I have subjected them to heavy coil and high round count. I have not had on fail or not hold zero.
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
I have a Burris Fast Fire 3 on my Ruger 22/45. Works well on that gun, but sits a bit high. At this point, I'd opt for the RMR on a defensive handgun.
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
Unfortunately, my Ruger 22/45 does not have the rear sight dovetail, it has the picatinny rail, so my sight sits higher. I could get a rear dovetail cut, but didn't want to spend the money.
 
I can see front sight, rear and target - just not all at once. :001_unsur Choosing which to not see, stinks.
This.
Nobody can see all at the same time, but young eyes can quickly focus between them and it seems to be all in focus.
A dot just puts the sight and the target on the same plain i.e. look through lens at the target and put that bright spot where you want the bullet to go.
 
Recently I received an email from Crimson Trace in which they indicated they would be introducing an optical sight for pistols.

View attachment 919921

The cost is on the rather high side: $400.

Recently while at a shooting range I saw one individual shooting a Glock 17. He had the sight below attached to the G17.


proxy.php

I spoke to the shooter and asked him about the sight he was using. He said it has helped him because normally he wears eyeglasses and the sight has enabled him to see the target better.

Wondering if any of you guys have put such sights on your pistols.
Got Venom's on a few guns, including S&W 686 revolvers, was a great improvement on my shooting (I also wear bifocals that can be a pita for normal sights).
 
My EDC, a S&W 9mm C.O.R.E. Sports a Trijicon RMR-07. I love it since I wear progressive lenses and can. I longer rapidly focus on the front sight.

I do need to get tritium irons for it, because columnating off hand in the dark is a challenge without seeing the irons.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Glad you like it.

We do have a set for the C.O.R.E. The SA240-601011
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AIMPOINT, AIMPOINT, AIMPOINT
yes they are expensive, but as the old saying goes, Buy once, cry once....you know the rest.
My Smith 625 is the latest home for my Aimpoint that I bought in 1983. I just changed out the battery the second time in all those years.
Built like a tank, and I have had this on some hard recoiling hardware.
I have newer ones on on my competition guns ( 22 and 45), I couldn't even take a guess how many rounds I have fired thru the 45 ( the Aimpoint is slide mounted)., But I shoot about a thousand rounds a month in practice.
 
As mentioned above, the mounts can vary. For a 1911, you can buy "frame mounts" which bridge over the slide. Or just mount the sight right onto the slide via having a slide base mounted on the top of the slide.
Both work for their purpose.
Bullseye shooters tend to go with the slide mount, to have the sight as low as possible.
 
I'm really going to have to take a good look at this. I think a red dot would make target acquisition must faster than using irons.
You should buy a cheap one to start and see if you like RDS better than iron before springing for a nice one.

I have found that reacquiring the dot after a shot is not as easy as lining up the traditional sights. May be muscle and eye memory from decades of using iron sights though.

Rifle is another matter entirely (for me anyway) and the dot is much easier to acquire after a shot. Once shouldered the eye is already mostly aligned with the barrel.
 
You should buy a cheap one to start and see if you like RDS better than iron before springing for a nice one.

I have found that reacquiring the dot after a shot is not as easy as lining up the traditional sights. May be muscle and eye memory from decades of using iron sights though.

Rifle is another matter entirely (for me anyway) and the dot is much easier to acquire after a shot. Once shouldered the eye is already mostly aligned with the barrel.

Could be and probably is true. If I didn’t have progressive lenses, I doubt that I would bother.


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Could be and probably is true. If I didn’t have progressive lenses, I doubt that I would bother.


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Yes, progressive lenses make it a lot more difficult to use iron sights. I am waiting for the next gun show to compare them all.
 
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