What's new

Dollar Store surprise/PAA Doppler

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Just tried this Dollar Store ($1.25, thanks to inflation) Chinese-made shave soap, "b-pure" brand. Wasn't expecting much.

IMG_20220612_130447378.jpg


Have tried similar with poor luck- waxy, miserable soaps that washed hands but would not lather. This one works!

Simple, linear bergamot scent, but lathers quickly and easily. Used new PAA Doppler Synth 26mm. Bigger than I thought brush, but nice.

IMG_20220612_130324307.jpg

Soap was perfect in every way, working much easier than many- put Williams to shame for that same buck.

Post shave lather peaks. For the price, impressive. 🤔 Being a hoarder, I'll probably go buy five more..


AA
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20220612_125210331.jpg
    IMG_20220612_125210331.jpg
    660.3 KB · Views: 24
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate are very controversial ingredients. You can read volumes about it on the web. Supposed to be harmful, carcinogenic, etc, yadda yadda. It’s a major ingredient in many commercial bar soaps and shampoos. Take with a grain of salt. But be aware that those ingredients are in there.
 
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate are very controversial ingredients. You can read volumes about it on the web. Supposed to be harmful, carcinogenic, etc, yadda yadda. It’s a major ingredient in many commercial bar soaps and shampoos. Take with a grain of salt. But be aware that those ingredients are in there.
I don't believe I have seen those ingredients in any of my soaps before. :eek2:

~doug~
 

nemo

Cheaper than ink
In my opinion it shouldn't even be called soap. But here are the rules in this link.

From the FDA site Frequently Asked Questions on Soap - https://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/cosmetic-products/frequently-asked-questions-soap

How are traditional soaps and synthetic detergents different?

Ordinary soap is made by combining fats or oils and an alkali, such as lye. The fats and oils, which may be from animal, vegetable, or mineral sources, are degraded into free fatty acids, which then combine with the alkali to form crude soap. The lye reacts with the oils, turning what starts out as liquid into blocks of soap. When made properly, no lye remains in the finished product. In the past, people commonly made their own soap using animal fats and lye that had been extracted from wood ashes.

Today there are very few true soaps on the market. Most body cleansers, both liquid and solid, are actually synthetic detergent products. Detergent cleansers are popular because they make suds easily in water and don't form gummy deposits. Some of these detergent products are actually marketed as "soap" but are not true soap according to the regulatory definition of the word.
 

FarmerTan

"Self appointed king of Arkoland"
Looks like a synthetic detergent bar, not really soap ingredients. You know, like fat saponified in a lye solution creating salts of the fatty acids and glycerin.

Sorbitol and sucrose are sweeteners ... how's it taste?
Well...... It does SMELL nice, I think a little bit like LaToja.

Doesn't taste as SALTY though, to my tongue!

(My mom heard me say a bad werd a time or two, and she's so sweet! She lets ME choose the soap for my punishment. True story doggone.
 
Well...... It does SMELL nice, I think a little bit like LaToja.

Doesn't taste as SALTY though, to my tongue!

(My mom heard me say a bad werd a time or two, and she's so sweet! She lets ME choose the soap for my punishment. True story doggone.

did you taste it? lol
 

Ad Astra

The Instigator
Very interesting, all! I was hoping the house chemists/soapmakers would take a learned look and have share an opinion.

Used it again today and it really worked well. @FarmerTan Dave, does it smell like just bergamot to you? Being a fellow vintage Avon aficionado, you'd know.

The sketchy imported chemicals don't surprise me. Chemical-wise .... I use gasoline, get it on hands- pretty sure that's a carcinogen. Same for RoundUp and bacon (all types). I think the tradeoff in usefulness is worth brief exposure. I have a cousin - who's a doctor - and he smokes the occasional cigar. One should make intelligent choices and enjoy life, both. They're not exclusive.

When I had a big-city commute, one day there was a horrible accident involving a train and traffic. Explosions, fire, lives lost. I was nowhere near it, gracias a Dios. But I remember thinking ... "Eat right. Exercise. Climb the corporate ladder ... and get incinerated waiting at a red light." So I'm eating the bacon, and using the soap.


AA
 
Regarding the sugars, from a soap-making website (hey, it's on the Internet, so it must be true):

Using sugars or sorbitol in soap is a great way to enhance the texture of soap and boost lather. Sugars and sorbitol act as humectants, which draw moisture to the skin. Sorbitol is sugar alcohol with high water solubility.
 
Top Bottom