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Does speed matter?

I mean, going way too slow can be a problem...I remember when I was learning to straight shave, I would take like 20+ minutes per pass and my lather would dry out on my face! Short of that, going as slow as you need to is probably the best approach...getting blade angle and pressure right is far more important than the speed of the stroke.
 
Fast, Slow, Quick, Deliberate. As Einstein said (almost): Everything is Relative.

Me running at full speed is just a leisurely jog for Usain Bolt.

As we learn the process, we find what's best for us.
 
I think it's possible to go ridiculously slow, but it's probably also unlikely. Going fast is just asking for trouble and has no advantage over a reasonable speed (unless the house is on fire and you need to finish up that pass).

Shorter strokes are easier to control because they don't require any wrist movement, thus making it waaaaaaay easier to keep the same blade/razor angle.
 
As I move to XTG the strokes are shorter and ATG even shorter again with buffing. As my stubble is 7/10 in coarseness I find ATG the most resistant and stubborn pass requiring the most attention to achieve that nice shave.
Hello, we haven't met each other, but it resonates with me.
I find razors that cut at a reclined angle(mild) have more tenderness erecting the follicles at the ATG pass.
In this regard, razors that can cut aggressively(more than 45°) in what is called guard riding can approach more steeply, almost perpendicular let's say, that the difference of shaving angle closes across the two opposite WTG-ATG directions.
 
Hello, we haven't met each other, but it resonates with me.
I find razors that cut at a reclined angle(mild) have more tenderness erecting the follicles at the ATG pass.
In this regard, razors that can cut aggressively(more than 45°) in what is called guard riding can approach more steeply, almost perpendicular let's say, that the difference of shaving angle closes across the two opposite WTG-ATG directions.
I've just read this... very accurate and impressively described.

Since posting I started a youtube channel and haven't really been on the forum much, I just post up all my shave there instead as I have less time to do both. So I went on to try the Feather SS with different kinds of Artist club blades and found this exact point magnified. I ended up using a perpendicular ATG swipe slicing action on the most stubborn dense coarse hair under my chin, with a feather artist club blade. I guess it's more apparent with the feather SS shavette razor because it is the blade that meets the hair first rather than a safety bar and exactly as you point out that ATG is best met around perpendicular...

There's a lot more to it than that and I've noticed that my hair grows in all different directions. And as if I let it grow for a longer period it literally is like "captain caveman" stuff... I have facial hair that grows up, down, sideways in both directions and even straight outward jutting out.
 
I think speed of stroke is a factor that deserves some consideration.

Going too fast and causing skin damage is the obvious one but in my experience going too slow can cause issues too.

In my early days I shaved very slowly, understandably perhaps, but I remember thinking back later that going so slow meant the blade was struggling to cut efficiently and I compensated by applying more pressure, with predictable results...
 
I would have thought that a speedy pass would facilitate a more efficient cut. Think medieval executioner, or cutting through a steak. But if im right there must be a point of maximum efficiency after which additional speed makes no real difference, and of course speed increases the likelihood of mistakes in technique etc etc.

Interestingly (at least to me) i normally take a good 30 minutes for prep, shave and tidy up. I really enjoy the quiet time and the ritual. But the other day I was in a rush and charged through a three pass shave ahead of a family takeaway meal being delivered, and I wound up with possibly the best BBS shave ive had.
 
Going too fast just makes it harder to re-attach:)

Be in control, whether its fast or slow.
If I go fast, I tend to apply pressure, so my respects to anybody who has such manual dexterity. You should have been a surgeon. :a16:

I need to go at a slow buffing speed, unfortunately.
 
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