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Do You Drink Your Coffee Black?

IMightBeWrong

Loves a smelly brush
I drink it black about 99% of the time. The other 1% is along the lines of cappuccino with dessert when dining out.

There's also a study I remember seeing that drinking black coffee was a sign of a more developed palate.
 
I will drink it black if it is good coffee. Good coffee doesnt taste all that bitter to me, especially if you brew it with a frenchpress or make it as an espresso shot.
 
There's also a study I remember seeing that drinking black coffee was a sign of a more developed palate.
Saying that someone who drinks black coffee has a "more developed palate" is like my mother once telling me that her preference for ultra modern (aka stark and cold) architecture reflects a more "sophisticated" taste, is offensive to me. We are simply talking about taste and personal preference here. To suggest that one's palate is more developed infers that they are superior to those who don't drink their coffee black. This should be a "to each his/her own" discussion. I have eaten in many of the top restaurants in NYC, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Paris and London. I also enjoy making gourmet meals on a regular basis and have been praised for my efforts. And we have raised our son to have a well developed palate at the age of 14. He loves sushi, has eaten Antilope, and pretty much every style of cooking there is. So I think I and my family have pretty developed palates and am justified in saying the above. And I like my french press coffee with frothed skim milk most of the time and I prefer my espresso black with a bit of sugar. I guess that also suggests I don't have a developed palate. I'm not trying to get combative here so I apologize if that is how I am coming across.
 
Love me black coffee, and black licorice!!

The jury is still out on whether or not I'm a psychopath.


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The coffee house near me had a latte called the black cat. It's an abuse latte! It's a fave.

Your friendly neighborhood BambulanceMan
 

IMightBeWrong

Loves a smelly brush
Saying that someone who drinks black coffee has a "more developed palate" is like my mother once telling me that her preference for ultra modern (aka stark and cold) architecture reflects a more "sophisticated" taste, is offensive to me. We are simply talking about taste and personal preference here. To suggest that one's palate is more developed infers that they are superior to those who don't drink their coffee black. This should be a "to each his/her own" discussion. I have eaten in many of the top restaurants in NYC, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Paris and London. I also enjoy making gourmet meals on a regular basis and have been praised for my efforts. And we have raised our son to have a well developed palate at the age of 14. He loves sushi, has eaten Antilope, and pretty much every style of cooking there is. So I think I and my family have pretty developed palates and am justified in saying the above. And I like my french press coffee with frothed skim milk most of the time and I prefer my espresso black with a bit of sugar. I guess that also suggests I don't have a developed palate. I'm not trying to get combative here so I apologize if that is how I am coming across.
Nah, I kind of agree with you. I am of the mind that the article I was remembering as well as the one in the OP are probably both just click bait silliness with no real research behind them. My dad brought me up eating everything. Organs like liver, heart, etc. we roast marrow and eat it from the femur with some toast and butter. My dad had always taken cream and sugar with his coffee. I used to until I started getting hooked on pour overs with lighter roasts and found that I could pick out the differences in flavor easier black. All the oils in a French Press will cover up more acidic light roasts that I like so I like to use more dark roasted coffees in the press and make Cafe Au Laits with them. I haven't done that in a while, though, simply because I don't have a frothed and heating up the milk takes more time. So 99% of the time I just brew some black coffee in my Kalita.
 
Saying that someone who drinks black coffee has a "more developed palate" is like my mother once telling me that her preference for ultra modern (aka stark and cold) architecture reflects a more "sophisticated" taste, is offensive to me. We are simply talking about taste and personal preference here. To suggest that one's palate is more developed infers that they are superior to those who don't drink their coffee black. This should be a "to each his/her own" discussion. I have eaten in many of the top restaurants in NYC, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Paris and London. I also enjoy making gourmet meals on a regular basis and have been praised for my efforts. And we have raised our son to have a well developed palate at the age of 14. He loves sushi, has eaten Antilope, and pretty much every style of cooking there is. So I think I and my family have pretty developed palates and am justified in saying the above. And I like my french press coffee with frothed skim milk most of the time and I prefer my espresso black with a bit of sugar. I guess that also suggests I don't have a developed palate. I'm not trying to get combative here so I apologize if that is how I am coming across.
I agree with your point and I am not going to dispute it. Except to say that when I hear "a more developed palate" when it comes to food, I often interpret that as shorthand for appreciating something that otherwise tasted bad the first time :) or that someone has increased their palette of flavors which can they can appreciate. When it comes to coffee that usually means the drinker can now tolerate bitter flavors or have started to favor it in some small measure rather than mask it with other more powerful flavors. Though philosophically if one adds more things to a cup of coffee wouldn't that provide more flavors for a truly developed palate to discern??

This is related to the debate over dark roasted vs lightly roasted coffee, where the bean changes flavor the longer it is roasted. Where the changes can be considered good/bad depending on what one likes.
 
In order to evaluate a food or beverage you MUST work with only that product without any additives.

Trying to evaluate a coffee after adding milk and sugar would be like evaluating the quality of water after it has been made into a soft drink.

The added ingredients will mask the taste of what you are evaluating.

Enjoy your coffee the way you like it but if you wish to compare different coffee you need to taste JUST the coffee.
 
For me there is nothing quite like hot, fresh coffee, black. Cooled down, or left to cook on a hotplate etc not for me. Yum.
 
All the oils in a French Press will cover up more acidic light roasts that I like so I like to use more dark roasted coffees in the press and make Cafe Au Laits with them. I haven't done that in a while, though, simply because I don't have a frothed and heating up the milk takes more time. So 99% of the time I just brew some black coffee in my Kalita.
A neighbor of mine who has a nice espresso machine suggested that I get an electric frother. Instead, I bought an inexpensive Bodum manual frother. It looks just like a french press only the plunger isn't as tight against the walls of the glass container. I only use skim milk, stick it in the microwave for 45 to 60 seconds and then plunge away. In less than two minutes I have a nice thick helping of froth for Cafe au Lait. And I guarantee my neighbor will still be waiting for his electric frother while I'm enjoying my coffee. This is the one I got. I had bought a different Bodum, more narrow and it didn't work at all. This one works like a charm. I'll never get an electric frother for $100 when I can have two of these for less than $20 each.

 

IMightBeWrong

Loves a smelly brush
A neighbor of mine who has a nice espresso machine suggested that I get an electric frother. Instead, I bought an inexpensive Bodum manual frother. It looks just like a french press only the plunger isn't as tight against the walls of the glass container. I only use skim milk, stick it in the microwave for 45 to 60 seconds and then plunge away. In less than two minutes I have a nice thick helping of froth for Cafe au Lait. And I guarantee my neighbor will still be waiting for his electric frother while I'm enjoying my coffee. This is the one I got. I had bought a different Bodum, more narrow and it didn't work at all. This one works like a charm. I'll never get an electric frother for $100 when I can have two of these for less than $20 each.

That's cool! Thanks for showing this to me, I didn't know about these. I just knew about those little spinning disk frothers.
 
A neighbor of mine who has a nice espresso machine suggested that I get an electric frother. Instead, I bought an inexpensive Bodum manual frother. It looks just like a french press only the plunger isn't as tight against the walls of the glass container. I only use skim milk, stick it in the microwave for 45 to 60 seconds and then plunge away. In less than two minutes I have a nice thick helping of froth for Cafe au Lait. And I guarantee my neighbor will still be waiting for his electric frother while I'm enjoying my coffee. This is the one I got. I had bought a different Bodum, more narrow and it didn't work at all. This one works like a charm. I'll never get an electric frother for $100 when I can have two of these for less than $20 each.

I need this

Your friendly neighborhood BambulanceMan
 
Yes. You do need this. I bought it on Amazon. And it works really well. Better than I expected even. So you have to work a little for your froth. A little work never hurt anyone. Keeps you young.
 
Jim:
I like mine with dry creamer (if they have any), and sugar. If they fresh/potted cream, I ask to have the cream 'warmed-up' but not scolding hot (which will cuddle when added to hot coffee).


But you know what really 'grinds my gears' is to get served hot coffee with cold cream (and when used becomes tepid coffee), and/or getting a cup of 'joe' filled to the brim (you can't add any creamer and/or sugar). :001_rolle

Coffee - 1.jpg "Coffee has its own subtle language". CBJ
 
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