What's new
  • Guest
    As per our long standing policy of not permitting medical advice on the forum - all threads concerning the Coronavirus will be locked.
    For more info on the coronavirus please see the link below:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html

Do you apply a Fragrance in addition to your Aftershave? If so, when?

Do you apply a Fragrance in addition to your Aftershave?

  • Yes

  • No

  • Occasionally

  • Right Away

  • One Hour

  • Later


Results are only viewable after voting.
Since Aftershave is usually short lasting I do it all the time. I usually start the day with a shower followed by a shave and then breakfast. By the time I am getting dressed the Aftershave scent has usually worn off.
 
I usually shave first thing and apply an aftershave. I’ll usually do a few shots of complimenting cologne on my way out he door to work, which is usually within 45 minutes after shaving.
If I don’t have a matching cologne then I’ll usually do another quick splash of aftershave on my way out the door.

I’m pretty picky as I tend to purchase the entire line of a product so I have matching scentS from shave cream to cologne and I never mix and match.
 

never-stop-learning

Contributor
Ambassador
20200919
Aftershave: Fine Italian Citrus
Fragrance: Shades Of Blue For Men EdT Spray (Belcam Version Of Light Blue Pour Homme)
20200919_203420~2.jpg
Nice combination. Layers well. :)
 

ajkel64

The Aussie Bulldog
Moderator
I used to use Emu Oil Lotion as an aftershave balm and then either use a spray cologne or dribble some aftershave on my chest for the smell. Now I mainly use proper aftershave balms and then do the same with the spray Cologne or the proper aftershave. Otherwise to me there is far too many smells going on especially when you add some deodorant. If in the event I am only using a proper aftershave then I will apply the aftershave and nothing else.
 
I mostly use cologne after shower, so the days when I shave before shower I do use cologne post taking my shower and the days when I shave after shower I use cologne first and then go for shaving. For me aftershave and cologne/EDT are unrelated stuff intended for different purposes.
 

Cal

Contributor
HELP! Scotty's beamed me up to a strange (i.e. unknown to me [till now]) sub-forum. :scared:

But I'll play. I voted "no." I usually always finish my shave with an aftershave splash... which I enjoy at the time but am glad that is dissipates within ~two hours. The thought of having a scent clinging to me for longer than that (i.e. from EdTs, EdPs, etc) just turns me off.

I'm happy just smelling like "me" for the rest of the day. :laugh: :001_tt2:
 
My aftershaves are either nonscented (i.e. Nivea) or fade very quickly (I.e. Lucky Tiger). So I often wear cologne applied before leaving the house as I don’t have aftershaves that serve in that way.

That said, I have Clubman and Stirling Executive Man aftershave balm on the way, so those products may be different.
 
I am with @Marco and @Sabre on this topic and although I voted "Occasionally", a proper answer would be - it depends.

A "Cologne" is a somewhat ambiguous term, as it has a different meaning to different people, covering everything from EDC, EDT to EDP. I doubt most men know the difference, hence they just say "Cologne", which is a "male equivalent" of Perfume. @never-stop-learning BTW, your post title further adds to the confusion, as "Fragrance" (oil) is an ingredient of a "Cologne" that makes it smell the way it does. It's not a product in its own right, that you apply on its own.

So, whether I follow up an A/S with another "Cologne" type product largely depends what A/S I apply and when.

If I shave in the evening, I do so before taking a shower. So when I'm done showering, I'd typically apply a light non-alcoholic A/S balm, like Nivea Sensitive.

If I'm meeting a client or have any sort of formal business or event to attend, then I'd shave in the morning and follow the A/S by an EDT/EDP of the same product line, say Dior Eau Sauvage post-shave balm + Eau Sauvage EDT original. That said, "Cologne" (EDC, EDT, EDP) should never be applied on a freshly shaved face, as the fragrance oils can cause a severe skin irritation.
 

never-stop-learning

Contributor
Ambassador
A "Cologne" is a somewhat ambiguous term, as it has a different meaning to different people, covering everything from EDC, EDT to EDP. I doubt most men know the difference, hence they just say "Cologne", which is a "male equivalent" of Perfume. @never-stop-learning BTW, your post title further adds to the confusion, as "Fragrance" (oil) is an ingredient of a "Cologne" that makes it smell the way it does. It's not a product in its own right, that you apply on its own.
Well, it was going to be confusing to some folks, whether I used 'cologne', 'fragrance', 'scent', 'EdT', 'EdP' or something else. ;)
 

Silky Glide

Contributor
Sometimes I will apply witch hazel and then a cologne or use a short lasting A/S (such as Trumper's West Indian Limes or Myrsol Metisol) followed by a cologne.
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
BTW, your post title further adds to the confusion, as "Fragrance" (oil) is an ingredient of a "Cologne" that makes it smell the way it does. It's not a product in its own right, that you apply on its own.
I disagree. You might note the name of this subforum.

Merriam-Webster 1(b) definition is "something (such as a perfume) compounded to give off a sweet or pleasant odor." I think "fragrance" is a useful term as an umbrella term for cologne, edts, edps, even ***, if worn for their scent properties rather than healing or medicinal properties. I would say that "scent" is a reasonable umbrella term, too.

"Fragrance" as an English word, does have a variety of potential meanings and nuances.

As for "fragrance" (oil)," I think the term is really "fragrance oil," although these days not every scent ingredient is going to be an oil. I do not think I have heard or read of a scentmaker compounding a particular commercial scent (edt, perfume, or whatever) of various fragrances, in the sense of ingredients that have scent properties.

Just my 2 cents, but I am pretty sure I am correct! :)
 

Avi

Contributor
At the risk of sounding a bit argumentative, I think this question generalizes to ones soaps. To pick an easy example Stirling seems to have triplicates of a thousand scents in soap, balm, and cologne form. And as such it leads to this self-inflicted complication on how these scents might interact.

To this point I do not get the obsession of scented soaps over the performance / quality and it seems to me to be far more preferable to stick with unscented after shave and/or mildly scented or unscented soaps.

I say this as someone who TH 1805 in triplicate because I am also self contradictory ;)
 
Top Bottom