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do bobbers weaken fishing lines?

I usually just jig or troll, don't have any real experience with bobbers.

While at the store, I took a look at the round clip-on balls, and the stick versions that use a spring to lock onto the line.

My first thought was that if a large aggressive fish were to strike, then the the wire clips or spring might weaken the line at that area.

Anyone experience this? Is it fine as-is or should I use a length of braided line at the place of attachment?





PS...I'm using 6 and 8 lbs mono filament. Casting into a river from shore or dock and letting current take line further out using float.
 
I have never had an issue using bobbers. I tend to prefer spinner baits or Memphis rooster tails, but bobbers and a shiner can be quite effective.

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Thanks guys; weariness now brought back a notch.

I was of the old mentality that bobbers were for kids, but doing a bit of online digging has really opened my eyes.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
I don’t think they would have been around for decades if they caused lines to snap. I’ve used bobbers my whole life and just like JJ_sharp said, my lines break at the knot when stressed.

Caught a 5lb bass with a worm and bobber once.

I’ve seen some folks drag the bobber up the line to get a deeper hook depth and that, IMO, does stress the line. Causes it to fray and twist. Best to take the bobber off completly to reposition it.
 
Thanks again guys.

....I’ve seen some folks drag the bobber up the line to get a deeper hook depth and that, IMO, does stress the line. Causes it to fray and twist. Best to take the bobber off completly to reposition it.

Let me guess, they were using borrowed equipment, right? A lot of folks just don't care when they themselves didn't pay for something.

Tie a rubber band around your line and hook the bobber to it.

Thanks, I'll keep that in mind.
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
The plastic red/white ones with the little metal hooks at either end might do a small amount of wear and tear, so I'd go with the cork and stick model instead.
 
The plastic red/white ones with the little metal hooks at either end might do a small amount of wear and tear, so I'd go with the cork and stick model instead.

Some of the "cork and stick" models now have metallic springs to clip onto the line; you pull the spring back, place the line in the notch and release the spring:
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Just read about the Lindy Foam Cigar Floats which are supposed to be pretty good for casting in rivers with strong current:
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Although my current need is for casting into a river, I realize (thanks to the interwebs) that I've really been missing out. Will probably have to try some still water stick floaters eventually as well.
 
The ones with the weights on the bottom can cast further, and that is good. The bad is that you give up knowing when a fish lifts you bait/hook/sinker UP (that is a key for the round un-weighted bobers).
I like bobbers, but I seldom have bait because I am not serious enough of a fisherman these days. I just chunk a jig out there and hope for the best (not much effort).
 

BigFoot

The Real Beast of Bray Road!
I’ve seen some folks drag the bobber up the line to get a deeper hook depth and that, IMO, does stress the line. Causes it to fray and twist. Best to take the bobber off completly to reposition it.

In this case use a slip bobber. You can cast farther and the bobber stop on your line is designed to be adjusted. That has always been my go to if adjusting depth a lot in deeper water.
 
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Never had an issue, but the biggest fish we caught was catfish. We used a fix bobber on cane fishing poles. For a rod and reel, we used a slip type bobber that was just an ellipsoid of Styrofoam painted red and white, with a plastic tube through the middle. The bobber would remain on the surface until a strike. Note that with a slip type the bait would go to the bottom, but catfish tend to be bottom feeders.
 
In this case you a slip bobber. You can cast farther and the bobber stop on your line is designed to be adjusted. That has always been my go to if adjusting depth a lot in deeper water.
These bobbers were great when salt water fishing when you need to go deep.
 
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